Buscar
 
 

Resultados por:
 


Rechercher Búsqueda avanzada

Últimos temas
» The Michael Zager Band - Let's All Chant
Dom Oct 27, 2013 1:16 am por CristianFC

» Voz pasiva: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 11:01 am por The Boss

» Oraciones condicionales Tipo I + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:57 am por The Boss

» Comparativos y superlativos: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:52 am por The Boss

» Present Perfect: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:50 am por The Boss

» There is / There are - Some / Any - A / An- Much / Many: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:48 am por The Boss

» El futuro + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:45 am por The Boss

» Futuro con "going to": Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:32 am por The Boss

» Pasado simple y verbos irregulares: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:07 am por The Boss

Navegación
 Portal
 Índice
 Miembros
 Perfil
 FAQ
 Buscar
Foro

Estadisticas web
Diciembre 2016
LunMarMiérJueVieSábDom
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Calendario Calendario

Foro

Estadisticas web

1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Página 1 de 2. 1, 2  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 24, 2008 12:35 am

1001 films you must see before you die
Part I: Silent era


In 2002, editor Stephen Jay Schneider has brought together 1001 movies ranging from art house classics to westerns, written by leading film critics and journalists. A dozen genres are covered: musicals, thrillers, westerns, science-fiction, comedy, war, horror, epics, film noir, art-house, romance, and social drama, arranged in chronological order.



The reviews accompanying each title from this list have been taken from "www.amazon.com" and from the "Wikipedia".


Última edición por JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:46 pm, editado 3 veces

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 24, 2008 1:15 am

01
Le voyage dans la lune (A trip to the moon) (Georges Melies, 1902)




A Trip to the Moon (French: Le Voyage dans la lune) is a 1902 French black and white silent science fiction film. It is loosely based on two popular novels of the time: From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne and The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells.
The film was written and directed by Georges Méliès, assisted by his brother Gaston. The film runs 14 minutes if projected at 16 frames per second, which was the standard frame rate at the time the film was produced. It was extremely popular at the time of its release and is the best-known of the hundreds of fantasy films made by Méliès. A Trip to the Moon is the first science fiction film, and utilizes innovative animation and special effects, including the iconic shot of the rocketship landing in the moon's eye.



Última edición por JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:37 pm, editado 3 veces

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 24, 2008 2:08 am

02
The great train robbery (Edwin S. Porter, 1903)




The Great Train Robbery is a 1903 western film by Edwin S. Porter. Twelve minutes long, it is considered a milestone in film making, expanding on Porter's previous work Life of an American Fireman. The film used a number of innovative techniques including cross cutting, double exposure composite editing, camera movement and on location shooting. Cross-cuts were a new, sophisticated editing technique. Some prints were also hand colored in certain scenes. None of the techniques were original to The Great Train Robbery, and it is now considered that it was heavily influenced by Frank Mottershaw's earlier British film A Daring Daylight Burglary. The film uses simple editing techniques (each scene is a single shot) and the story is mostly linear (with only a few "meanwhile" moments), but it represents a significant step in movie making, being one of the first "narrative" movies of significant length. It was quite successful in theaters and was imitated many times.



Última edición por JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 12:20 pm, editado 1 vez

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 24, 2008 1:15 pm

03
The birth of a nation (David W. Griffith, 1915)




A pivotal moment in film history. After The Birth of a Nation, nothing was the same: not the way audiences watched movies, not the way filmmakers created them. D.W. Griffith's jumbo-size saga of the Civil War expanded the boundaries of storytelling on the screen, conveying a richer, more complicated (and certainly longer) tale than anyone had seen in a movie before. The delicate relationships, the sad passage of time, the spectacular battle scenes all look as fresh and innovative today as they did in 1915. So do Griffith's brilliant actors, most of them--including favorite leading lady Lillian Gish--drawn from his regular stock company. What has become increasingly problematic about The Birth of a Nation is Griffith's condescending attitude toward black slaves, and the ringing excitement surrounding the founding of the Ku Klux Klan. Griffith, whose political ideas were naive at best, seemed genuinely surprised by the criticism of his masterwork, and for his next project he turned to the humanist preaching of the massive Intolerance. Despite protests, Birth sold more tickets than any other movie, a record that stood for decades, and President Woodrow Wilson famously compared it to "history written in lightning." That judgment has lasted.



Última edición por JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:54 pm, editado 3 veces

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 24, 2008 1:16 pm

04
Les vampires (The vampires) (Louis Feuillade, 1915)




This legendary seven-hour silent French serial, one of the earliest and most original gangster films, combines realism and fantasy. Written and directed by Louis Feuillade, Les Vampires concerns an intrepid reporter's pursuit of a strange gang of jewel thieves terrorizing Paris. The gang ambitiously seeks political, psychological, and sexual domination of the city's social elite, with the seductive Irma Vep (an anagram of "vampire") as its brazen leader. While slow going at first, the 10-part serial becomes more and more fascinating with each episode, thanks in large part to the alluring Musidora as Irma Vep. Because of her many guises and frightful charms, she truly becomes a vampire of sorts. Feuillade achieves a subversive, nightmarish atmosphere amid the everyday goings-on of the city. Filmed on the streets and back alleys of World War I Paris, the 1915 picture was a huge commercial success, though temporarily banned by Paris's chief of police for glamorizing crime.



Última edición por JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 1:21 pm, editado 5 veces

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 24, 2008 1:17 pm

05
Intolerance (David W. Griffith, 1916)




After Birth of a Nation, what do you do for an encore, especially after said film has branded you a racist? D.W. Griffith, the silent era's "king of the world," mounted this melodramatic spectacle of "Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages," four stories that illustrate "how hatred and intolerance have battled against love and charity." Critic Heywood Broun, upon the film's release, probably said it best: "Quite the most marvelous thing which has been put on the screen, but as a theory of life it is trite." But what's on the screen is dazzling!
Griffith interweaves the four parallel stories set, respectively, in the modern era (fuddy-duddy reformers and a workers' strike), Jerusalem (Christ's crucifixion), 1572 Paris (a "hotbed" of persecution against the Huguenots), and ancient Babylon. No collection of silent films is complete without this landmark, awe-inspiring epic, which really does boast a cast of thousands (the most memorable of which is Constance Talmadge as the spunky Mountain Girl). The fall of Babylon ranks with one of the great action set pieces, complete with racing chariots, a nifty decapitation (at the hands of Elmo Lincoln, the man who would be Tarzan), and falls from what appear to be incredible heights. The edge-of-your-seat climax to the modern story, a race against time to save an innocent young man from the electric chair, is another bravura sequence.



Última edición por JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:42 pm, editado 1 vez

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:30 pm

06
Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari (The cabinet of Dr. Caligari)
(Robert Wiene, 1919)




A milestone of the silent film era and one of the first "art films" to gain international acclaim, this eerie German classic from 1919 remains the most prominent example of German expressionism in the emerging art of the cinema. Stylistically, the look of the film's painted sets--distorted perspectives, sharp angles, twisted architecture--was designed to reflect (or express) the splintered psychology of its title character, a sinister figure who uses a lanky somnambulist (Conrad Veidt) as a circus attraction. But when Caligari and his sleepwalker are suspected of murder, their novelty act is surrounded by more supernatural implications. With its mad-doctor scenario, striking visuals, and a haunting, zombie-like character at its center, Caligari was one of the first horror films to reach an international audience, sending shock waves through artistic circles and serving as a strong influence on the classic horror films of the 1920s, '30s, and beyond. It's a museum piece today, of interest more for its historical importance, but Caligari still casts a considerable spell.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:38 pm

07
Broken blossoms (David W. Griffith, 1919)




D.W. Griffith was many things: movie innovator, maker of grand statements (The Birth of a Nation and Intolerance being among the biggest of all silent films), the first American superstar director--the Steven Spielberg of his era. Griffith was also very much a conscious artist, a man who did not think of movies as a mere medium for entertainment but as an art form. The mute evidence of this can be found on ample display in Griffith's 1919 drama Broken Blossoms, a tragic and completely uncommercial project that proved to be hugely popular. The director's most favored leading lady, Lillian Gish, plays an adolescent girl in London's rough Limehouse district; abused by her father (Donald Crisp), a crude boxer, she is cared for by a poetic Chinese man (Richard Barthelmess). Gish, who had doubts about playing a child (and was not yet fully recovered from a brush with the deadly Spanish flu epidemic), delivers a magnificent performance. Justly famous for her hysterical meltdown while trapped in a closet, she also brings off the smaller moments: her hesitation while gazing at a flower she can't possibly afford to buy is a heartbreaking piece of pantomime. Griffith's delicacy of touch extends to matters of race, as he clearly sides with the refined man from China, who must endure the prattle of white men boasting about traveling to the Orient and converting "the heathen." Small in scale compared to Griffith's mightier projects, Broken Blossoms is nevertheless one of his most beautiful films, and a landmark of the silent era.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:44 pm

08
Way down East (David W. Griffith, 1920)




In what may have been his most brilliant surprise, D.W. Griffith transformed an archaic melodrama about a wronged woman into a transcendent love story of redemption. Lillian Gish plays an innocent New Englander seduced by an urbane charmer (Lowell Sherman), who arranges a mock marriage and then abandons her when she's pregnant. When the baby dies from illness, Gish leaves the city and changes her identity. She finds herself reborn in the pastoral splendor of a farming community, catching the adoring eye of a young idealist (Richard Barthelmess), only to have the past come back to haunt her. Griffith made two kinds of films: spectacles and love stories. It's the tremulous love stories such as Way Down East that have endured the best. This 1920 film is a triumph of humanity over cruelty, a work that brilliantly conveys emotion through environment. The famous climax on the floating river of ice is still amazing--especially since it uses no special effects.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:23 pm

09
Within our gates (Oscar Micheaux, 1920)




Within Our Gates is a 1920 silent race film that dramatically depicts the racial situation in America during the violent years of Jim Crow, the Ku Klux Klan, the Great Migration, and the emergence of the "New Negro". The story focuses on an African-American woman who goes North in an effort to help a minister in the Deep South raise money to keep a school open for poor Black children. Her romance with a black doctor eventually leads to revelations about her family's past that expose the racial skeletons in America's closet, most famously through the film's depiction of the injustice of lynching. Produced, written and directed by novelist Oscar Micheaux, it is the oldest known surviving film made by an African-American director.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:26 pm

10
Körkarlen (The phantom chariot) (Victor Sjöström, 1921)




Körkarlen is a classic 1921 Swedish silent black and white film. Made in 1921, it was directed by and starred Victor Sjöström, and also starred Hilda Borgstrom, Tore Svennberg, and Astrid Holm. It was based on a novel of the same title Körkarlen (1912) by Selma Lagerlöf.
The film is a drama, telling the tale of a legend that the last person to die in any year, if he or she is a sinner, will for the next twelve months drive the Phantom Chariot which takes the souls of the dead. This seems to be the destined fate of the films anti-hero, a drunk (played by Sjöström) left for dead after a fight in a graveyard and taken aboard the Phantom Carriage as the clock nears midnight on the last night of the year. Here he is taken to witness how his vicious behaviour has affected those around him, including his abandoned wife and children and a dying Salvation Army girl (Astrid Holm) who has unavailingly tried to save him.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:28 pm

11
Orphans of the storm (David W. Griffith, 1921)




This is D.W. Griffith's last great success, an epic melodrama from 1922 about two orphaned girls (real-life sisters Lillian and Dorothy Gish) raised in the same house and tragically separated during the French Revolution's infamous reign of terror. While this is no Birth of a Nation or Intolerance, it still reveals Griffith's inimitable talent for spectacle and intimacy. Not surprisingly, it works best when focusing on the plight of the two sisters: Lillian is a peasant who cares for the blind Dorothy, a product of the deposed aristocracy. Orphans of the Storm is a film about intriguing pairings. Mingling with the upper class to help find Dorothy, Lillian falls in love with the handsome and compassionate Joseph Schildkraut (best known as Otto Frank in The Diary of Anne Frank) and beguiles the influential Danton. Dorothy, meanwhile, is held captive by a family of gypsies, and is fought over by two brothers. Despite the lavish sets and Lillian's stirring performance, the love stories and political tumult don't quite mesh. But there are two magnificent moments emblematic of Griffith's dual talents: When Lillian recognizes Dorothy's plaintive voice outside her window and comes to her rescue, and the thrilling climax when Danton rescues Lillian from the guillotine.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:30 pm

12
La souriante Madame Beudet (The smiling Madame Beudet)
(Germaine Dulac, 1921)




La Souriante Madame Beudet (The Smiling Madame Beudet) is a short French silent film made in 1922, directed by famed surrealist director Germaine Dulac. It is considered by many to be one of the first truly "feminist" films. It tells the story of an intelligent woman trapped in a loveless marriage.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:33 pm

13
Dr. Mabuse, der spieler (Dr. Mabuse, the gambler)
(Fritz Lang, 1922)




Dr. Mabuse the Gambler is actually two films in one--or, more precisely, one film in two feature-length parts totaling four-and-a-half hours and conceived to be watched on consecutive evenings. Its title character is a criminal mastermind with the power and the will to orchestrate complex capers, counterfeit national currencies, manipulate the stock market, and hypnotically bend anyone to play a role in his diabolical designs. The hand of Mabuse seems to reach everywhere--for the excellent reason that the Doctor himself, a master of disguise, turns out to be just about anywhere at just the moment his intervention will wreak havoc and wreck lives. (He's played by Rudolf Klein-Rogge, who would repeat the part ten years later in The Testament of Dr. Mabuse and also, in spirit if not in name, in Lang's dazzling 1928 film Spies; he was also the inventor Rotwang in Metropolis--as well as, offscreen, the former husband of Lang's screenwriter wife Thea von Harbou!)
The film's title in German is Doktor Mabuse der Spieler, and our supervillain is really less a gambler (all his games of chance are rigged) than a player: playing multiple roles, but even more importantly, playing with others' lives, playing with the very fabric of modern reality. The subtitles of the two parts are "A Picture of the Time" and "People of the Time"; the film is an artifact of the Weimar era when, as one character remarks, "We are bored and tired ... we need sensations of a very special kind to remain alive." Lang and his art directors, Otto Hunte and Karl Stahl-Urach, create a hallucinatory mise-en-scène in which the decor is at once stark and decadent, a playground for all manner of perverse spectacle and gamesmanship, a maze of corridors and doorways and streets where the modern and the gothic interlayer. This world ripe for Mabusian manipulation prefigured Hitler by a decade--and in one of his last declarations, the Doctor anticipates more contemporary visionaries of chaos: "I feel as a state within a state, with which I have always been at war." Fritz Lang continues to be a chillingly prophetic filmmaker.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Sep 29, 2009 3:35 pm

14
Nanook of the North (Robert J. Flaherty, 1922)




Robert J. Flaherty, who wrote, directed, produced, shot, and edited this landmark picture, will forever be remembered as the godfather of documentary filmmaking. While this landmark 1922 production, shot on the northeastern shore of Hudson Bay, isn't a true documentary by contemporary conventions, it remains the first great nonfiction film. With the help of Nanook and his friends and family, Flaherty undertook the mission of re-creating an Eskimo culture that no longer existed in a series of staged scenes. Nanook ice fishes, harpoons a walrus, catches a seal, traps, builds an igloo, and trades pelts at a trading post, all captured by Flaherty's inquisitive camera. Though he presents a "happy" culture bordering on primitive innocence (Nanook and his family were in reality quite westernized), his loving portrait is anything but condescending. Ultimately Flaherty shares his tremendous respect and awe for a culture that has learned to not just survive but thrive in such an inhospitable environment. On a purely visual level the film is a beautiful work of cinema, an understated drama in an austere, unblemished landscape of snow and ice. With unerring simplicity and directness, Flaherty re-creates the details and rhythms of a culture long gone and gives the world a glimpse.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  The Boss el Miér Sep 30, 2009 2:29 pm

15
Nosferatu (F.W. Murnau, 1922)




As noted critic Pauline Kael observed, "... this first important film of the vampire genre has more spectral atmosphere, more ingenuity, and more imaginative ghoulish ghastliness than any of its successors." Some really good vampire movies have been made since Kael wrote those words, but German director F.W. Murnau's 1922 version remains a definitive adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Created when German silent films were at the forefront of visual technique and experimentation, Murnau's classic is remarkable for its creation of mood and setting, and for the unforgettably creepy performance of Max Schreck as Count Orlok, a.k.a. the blood-sucking predator Nosferatu. With his rodent-like features and long, bony-fingered hands, Schreck's vampire is an icon of screen horror, bringing pestilence and death to the town of Bremen in 1838. (These changes of story detail were made necessary when Murnau could not secure a copyright agreement with Stoker's estate.) Using negative film, double-exposures, and a variety of other in-camera special effects, Murnau created a vampire classic that still holds a powerful influence on the horror genre. (Werner Herzog's 1978 film Nosferatu the Vampyre is both a remake and a tribute, and Francis Coppola adopted many of Murnau's visual techniques for Bram Stoker's Dracula.) Seen today, Murnau's film is more of a fascinating curiosity, but its frightening images remain effectively eerie.


The Boss
Admin

Cantidad de envíos : 73
Fecha de inscripción : 13/07/2008

Ver perfil de usuario http://jm-ingles.forosactivos.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  The Boss el Miér Sep 30, 2009 2:31 pm

16
Häxan (Witchcraft through the ages)
(Benjamin Christensen, 1922)




Witchcraft through the ages is explored with dark wit in this silent classic. Writer-director Benjamin Christensen uses a historical study of witchcraft as a jumping-off point for a fascinating film that is part science, part horror, and part social commentary. This Criterion edition uses a beautiful print, a rearrangement of music from the original Danish premiere, and the original Swedish intertitles (with subtitles). Goodies include commentary by Danish film scholar Casper Tybjerg, the option of watching a narrated version without intertitles, and test shots from the film. The test shots, in particular, give insight into the early filmmaking process, as when Christensen uses his own image to try out (and reject) a flying effect. This is a worthy edition to the collection of fans of horror films, silent films, and film in general.


The Boss
Admin

Cantidad de envíos : 73
Fecha de inscripción : 13/07/2008

Ver perfil de usuario http://jm-ingles.forosactivos.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  The Boss el Miér Sep 30, 2009 2:42 pm

17
Foolish wives (Erich Von Stroheim, 1922)




Foolish Wives (1922) is an American drama silent film written and directed by Erich von Stroheim. Although not credited on the screen, the motion picture was produced by Irving Thalberg, who would go on to become one of the sharpest studio heads of all time at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The drama features von Stroheim, Rudolph Christians, Miss DuPont, Maude George, and others.
When released in 1922, the film was the most expensive film made at that time. Originally, von Stroheim intended for the film to run anywhere between 6 and 10 hours, but the studio heads were quite opposed to his idea, as such, they cut the final product drastically before the release date.
The silent drama tells the story of a man who names himself Count Wladislaw Sergius Karamzin (von Stroheim) in order to seduce rich women and extort money from them, especially those who are ignorant enough to let themselves be seduced by him. He has set up shop in Monte Carlo and his partners in crime (and possible lovers) are his cousins: faux-Princess Vera Petchnikoff (Busch) and faux-Her Highness Olga Petchnikoff (George). Count Karamzin begins his latest scam on the wife of an American envoy, Helen Hughes (George), even though her husband is near by.

As I haven't found a good excerpt of this film in Youtube, there is a fragment of a documentary about Stroheim with some scenes:


The Boss
Admin

Cantidad de envíos : 73
Fecha de inscripción : 13/07/2008

Ver perfil de usuario http://jm-ingles.forosactivos.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  The Boss el Miér Sep 30, 2009 2:47 pm

18
Our hospitality (Buster Keaton & John G. Blystone)




Our Hospitality is a silent comedy directed, produced, written by and starring Buster Keaton. Released in 1923 by Metro Pictures Corporation, the movie uses slapstick and situational comedy to tell the story of Willie McKay, a city slicker who gets caught in the middle of the infamous Canfield & McKay feud, an obvious satire of the real-life Hatfield-McCoy feud.


The Boss
Admin

Cantidad de envíos : 73
Fecha de inscripción : 13/07/2008

Ver perfil de usuario http://jm-ingles.forosactivos.net

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 11:58 am

19
La roue (The wheel) (Abel Gance, 1923)




La Roue (English: The Wheel) is a silent French film, directed by Abel Gance, who later directed Napoléon and J'accuse!. It was released in 1923. Originally running over nine hours, its recent editions have been cut to about four hours. The film used then-revolutionary lighting techniques, and rapid scene changes and cuts.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 12:01 pm

20
The thief of Bagdad (Raoul Walsh, 1924)




Douglas Fairbanks spared no expense for what may be the most lavish fantasy movie ever made. Inspired by the flying-carpet effects of Fritz Lang's somber but spectacular Der Müde Tod, Fairbanks (ever the canny businessman) bought the American rights, then hid the film away as he created his own show-stopping adventure, an adaptation of A Thousand and One Nights in which the magic-carpet ride was but one of many fantastic marvels. Swaggering through massive marketplace sets and cavernous throne rooms as an incorrigible thief and pickpocket, he scales towering walls (with the help of a magic rope) and leads a merry chase through crowded bazaars in his pursuit of loot--until he falls in love with the beautiful princess and vows to win her heart. This jaunty opening is but mere preamble to the spectacular second act. As three kings scour the globe to retrieve the rarest treasures known to man, the repentant thief embarks on an odyssey through caverns of fire and underwater caves. The marvelous special effects--from the smoke-belching dragon and underwater spider to the flying horse and magic armies arising from the dust--may show their seams but glow with a timeless sense of wonder. William Cameron Menzies's magnificent sets appear to have leapt from the pages of a storybook. As the adventure concludes in a torrent of movie magic that cascades nonstop through the breathless final hour, Fairbanks commands the screen with a hearty laugh and graceful athleticism, the cinema's first action hero triumphant.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 12:02 pm

21
Stachka (Strike) (Sergei M. Eisenstein, 1925)




Sergei Eisenstein's "Strike," with Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane," mark the most outstanding cinematic debuts in the history of film. Triggered by the suicide of a worker unjustly accused of theft, a strike is called by the laborers of a Moscow factory. The managers, owner and the Czarist government dispatch infiltrators in an attempt to break the workers unity. Unsuccessful, they hire the police and, in the film's most harrowing and powerful sequences, the unarmed strikers are slaughtered in a brutal confrontation.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 12:04 pm

22
Greed (Erich Von Stroheim, 1924)




Greed (1924) is a dramatic silent film. One of the most famous lost films in cinema history it is also considered one of the greatest films ever. It was directed by Erich von Stroheim and starring Gibson Gowland, Zasu Pitts, Jean Hersholt, Dale Fuller, Tempe Pigott, Sylvia Ashton, Chester Conklin, Joan Standing and Jack Curtis.
The plot follows an honest dentist whose wife wins a lottery ticket, only to become obsessed with money. When her former lover betrays the dentist as a fraud, all of their lives are destroyed. The movie was adapted by von Stroheim (shooting screenplay) and Joseph Farnham (titles) from the 1899 novel McTeague by Frank Norris. The onscreen credit for June Mathis was strictly a contractual obligation to her on the part of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (the parent studio), as she was not actually involved in the production.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 12:06 pm

23
Sherlock Jr. (Buster Keaton, 1924)




Sherlock, Jr. (1924) is an American comedy silent film starring and directed by Buster Keaton and written by Clyde Bruckman, Jean Havez and Joseph A. Mitchell. It features Kathryn McGuire, Joe Keaton and Ward Crane.
In 1991, Sherlock, Jr. was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant," and on 14 June 2000 the American Film Institute, as part of its AFI 100 Years... series, ranked the film as #62 in the list of the funniest films of all time (AFI's 100 Years... 100 Laughs).
A movie projectionist and janitor (Buster Keaton) who is studying to become a detective is in love with a beautiful girl (Kathryn McGuire). On a date he presents her with chocolates and an engagement ring. However, there is another man who's also interested in his girl (Ward Crane). One day he is accused of stealing his girlfriend's father's watch. He falls asleep on the job and dreams that he is a Sherlock Holmes-type detective, solving the case of who really stole the watch.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 01, 2009 12:09 pm

24
Der letzte mann (The last laugh) (F.W. Murnau, 1924)




One of the most influential silent films of all time, F.W. Murnau's street-drama tragedy (of an aging hotel porter who loses his job to a younger, more dashing man and suffers the humiliation of being demoted to washroom attendant) is a compendium of silent film techniques handled with a new sophistication. When the hearty, rather pompous Emil Jannings loses the dignified uniform of his station, he transforms into a scared little man scurrying through the shadows to hide his demotion from friends and family. Murnau captures the humiliation and calamitous fallout from the demotion (he loses not just his self-respect, but the esteem of his neighbors and even his apartment) in haunting, expressionistic images that magnify the petty events into tragic melodrama. The story seems a little extreme even for the genre but it's never less than a harrowing, subjective experience, even with the rather fanciful happy ending tacked on the end of it. Most famously, Murnau throws the camera into motion--one of his most famous shots takes the viewers up an elevator, through the grand hotel lobby, and out the revolving glass door in a single smooth shot--and it hasn't stopped moving since.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 6:47 am


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 1 de 2. 1, 2  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.