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1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:33 pm

25
Seven chances (Buster Keaton, 1925)




The reputation of Buster Keaton's Seven Chances rests almost solely on its outrageous finale, a brilliant cascade of comic invention that begins with a church full of blushing brides and builds to a surreal chase of epic proportions. The hapless groom is pursued by a angry mob of women clad in white lace and veils and ends up dodging rolling stones and massive boulders while fleeing an avalanche, never once losing his trademark deadpan. Buster plays a struggling lawyer who will inherit a fortune if he marries by 7 p.m. of his 27th birthday--the very day he receives notice of the potential windfall. When his longtime sweetheart turns him down, he frantically searches for someone--anyone--to wed. While Seven Chances doesn't have the sustained inspiration of his best films, Keaton fills the picture with inventive moments and clever ideas, notably a sustained series of desperate proposals (the "seven chances" of the title) that lead to the climactic swarm of aggressive brides. The biggest weakness is an embarrassing blackface performance that has only become more offensive with the years. Jean Arthur briefly appears as a switchboard operator. The film was remade in 1999 as The Bachelor with Chris O'Donnell.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:38 pm

26
The phantom of the opera (Rupert Julian, 1925)




The Phantom of the Opera is a 1925 silent film directed by Rupert Julian adaptation of the Gaston Leroux novel of the same title. The film featured Lon Chaney in the title role as the masked and facially deformed Phantom who haunts the Paris Opera House, causing murder and mayhem in an attempt to force the management to make the woman he loves a star. It is most famous for Lon Chaney's intentionally horrific, self-applied make-up, which was kept a studio secret until the film's premiere.
The film also features Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry, Arthur Edmund Carewe, Gibson Gowland, John St. Polis and Snitz Edwards. The only surviving cast member is Carla Laemmle (born 1909), niece of producer Carl Laemmle, who played a small role as "prima ballerina" in the film when she was about 15.
The movie was adapted by Elliott J. Clawson, Frank M. McCormack (uncredited), Tom Reed (titles) and Raymond L. Schrock. It was directed by Rupert Julian, with supplemental direction by Edward Sedgwick, and Lon Chaney (unconfirmed).


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:39 pm

27
Bronyenosyets Potyomkin (The battleship Potemkin)
(Sergei M. Eisenstein, 1925)




Sergei Eisenstein's revolutionary sophomore feature has so long stood as a textbook example of montage editing that many have forgotten what an invigoratingly cinematic experience he created. A 20th-anniversary tribute to the 1905 revolution, Eisenstein portrays the revolt in microcosm with a dramatization of the real-life mutiny aboard the battleship Potemkin. The story tells a familiar party-line message of the oppressed working class (in this case the enlisted sailors) banding together to overthrow their oppressors (the ship's officers), led by proto-revolutionary Vakulinchuk. When he dies in the shipboard struggle the crew lays his body to rest on the pier, a moody, moving scene where the citizens of Odessa slowly emerge from the fog to pay their respects. As the crowd grows Eisenstein turns the tenor from mourning a fallen comrade to celebrating the collective achievement. The government responds by sending soldiers and ships to deal with the mutinous crew and the supportive townspeople, which climaxes in the justly famous (and often imitated and parodied) Odessa Steps massacre. Eisenstein edits carefully orchestrated motions within the frame to create broad swaths of movement, shots of varying length to build the rhythm, close-ups for perspective and shock effect, and symbolic imagery for commentary, all to create one of the most cinematically exciting sequences in film history. Eisenstein's film is Marxist propaganda to be sure, but the power of this masterpiece lies not in its preaching but its poetry.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:42 pm

28
The gold rush (Charles Chaplin, 1925)




After the box-office failure of his first dramatic film, A Woman of Paris, Charlie Chaplin brooded over his ensuing comedy. "The next film must be an epic!" he recalled in his autobiography. "The greatest!" He found inspiration, paradoxically, in stories of the backbreaking Alaskan gold rush and the cannibalistic Donner Party. These tales of tragedy and endurance provided Chaplin with a rich vein of comic possibilities. The Little Tramp finds himself in the Yukon, along with a swarm of prospectors heading over Chilkoot Pass (an amazing sight restaged by Chaplin in his opening scenes, filmed in the snowy Sierra Nevadas). When the Tramp is trapped in a mountain cabin with two other fortune hunters, Chaplin stages a veritable ballet of starvation, culminating in the cooking of a leathery boot. Back in town, the Tramp is smitten by a dance-hall girl (Georgia Hale), but it seems impossible that she could ever notice him. The Gold Rush is one of Chaplin's simplest, loveliest features; and despite its high comedy, it never strays far from Chaplin's keen grasp of loneliness. In 1942, Chaplin reedited the film and added music and his own narration for a successful rerelease.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:43 pm

29
The big parade (King Vidor, 1925)




The Big Parade is a 1925 silent film which tells the story of an idle rich boy who joins the Army and is sent to France to fight in World War I, becomes friends with two working class men, experiences the horrors of trench warfare, and finds love with a French girl.
The film was groundbreaking for not glorifying the war or its human costs, exemplified by the lead character's loss of a leg from battle wounds. It heavily influenced all subsequent war films, especially All Quiet on the Western Front (1930). It was adapted by Harry Behn and King Vidor (uncredited) from the play by Joseph Farnham and the story Plumes by Laurence Stallings, and directed by Vidor. It stars John Gilbert, Renée Adorée, Claire Adams, Karl Dane, Robert Ober and Tom O'Brien.
The Big Parade was one of the greatest hits of the 1920s, and made Gilbert and Adorée major stars. Tragically, Renée Adorée would soon be diagnosed with tuberculosis and die only a few years later. The film is the highest grossing silent film in cinema history (taking in $6,400,000 at the box office, $22,000,000 worldwide.)[1]
After the film's producers found a clause in Vidor's contract, entitling the director to 20% of the net profits, studio lawyers called for a meeting with him. At this meeting, accountants played up the costs of the picture while downgrading their forecast of its potential success. King Vidor was thusly persuaded to sell his stake in the film before receiving his percentage. However, the film's tremendous success did establish Vidor as one of MGM's top directors for the rest of his career.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:45 pm

30
Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927)




Metropolis is a silent science fiction film directed by Fritz Lang and written by Lang and Thea von Harbou. Lang and von Harbou, who were married, wrote the screenplay in 1924, and the story was novelized by von Harbou in 1926. It is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and examines a common science fiction theme of the day: the social crisis between workers and owners in capitalism. The film stars Alfred Abel as the leader of the city, Gustav Fröhlich as his son, who tries to mediate between the elite caste and the workers, Brigitte Helm as both the pure-at-heart worker Maria and the debased robot version of her, and Rudolf Klein-Rogge as the mad scientist who created the robot.
Metropolis was produced in Germany in the Babelsberg Studios by Universum Film A.G. (UFA) and released in 1927 during a stable period of the Weimar Republic. The most expensive film of its time, it cost approximately 7 million Reichsmark to make. The film was cut substantially after its German premiere, and there have been several efforts to restore it. Also, the American copyright lapsed in 1953, which eventually led to a proliferation of versions being released on video.


Metropolis by Fritz Lang Trailer - The best free videos are right here

JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:47 pm

31
Sunrise: A song of two humans (F.W. Murnau, 1927)




There are those who rate Sunrise the greatest of all silent films. Then again, some consider it the finest film from any era. Such claims invite a backlash, but do yourself a favor and give it a look. At the very least, you'll know you've seen a movie of extraordinary visual beauty and emotional purity. This universal tale of a farm couple's journey from country to city and back again was the first American film for F.W. Murnau, the German director of Nosferatu and The Last Laugh whose everyday scenes seemed haunted by phantoms and whose most extravagant visions never lost touch with reality. Hollywood afforded him the technical resources to unleash his imagination, and in turn he opened up the power of camera movement and composition for a generation of American filmmakers. You'll never forget the walk in the swamp, the ripples on the lake, the trolley ride from forest to metropolis. This movie defines the cinema.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 02, 2009 12:50 pm

32
The General (Clyde Bruckman, 1927)




Buster Keaton's career reached its creative apex with this rousing comic adventure. Not merely one of the finest silent films, this remains one of the great film comedies of all time. The Great Stone Face stars as Southern railroad engineer Johnny Gray, a man with only two loves: the sweet Annabelle Lee (Marion Mack) and his trustworthy engine, the eponymous General. When Fort Sumner is fired upon he's one of the first to enlist, but when the war office rejects him (he's too valuable as a trained engineer) his sweetie rejects him as a coward. Johnny has the opportunity to prove his bravery when Yankee spies steal his engine and inadvertently kidnap Annabelle, and Johnny pursues with all the resources at his disposal: handcar, bicycle, and finally railroad engine. Keaton's love/hate relationship with technology and machinery shines as he becomes one with his beloved locomotive and wrestles with a finicky cannon that threatens to blow his engine off the tracks; with tremendous dexterity, he nails the humor with inimitably deadpan takes. Spunky Marion Mack makes a perfect partner for Keaton, not merely a foil but a gifted comedienne in her own right. Other Keaton films contain more laughs and inspired comic stunts, but none combines romance, adventure, and comedy into a solid story as seamlessly as this silent masterpiece.



Última edición por JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:52 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 12:53 pm

33
The unknown (Todd Browning, 1927)




The Unknown (1927) is a silent horror film directed by Tod Browning and featuring Lon Chaney as carnival knife thrower Alonzo the Armless and Joan Crawford as the scantily clad carnival girl he hopes to marry.
The Unknown is by far the most intense and demented of director Tod Browning's films (which include Dracula and Freaks). Joan Crawford always said that she learned more about acting from working with Chaney in this movie than from everything else in her long career put together, and critics often cite Chaney's performance as one of the greatest ever captured on film. Burt Lancaster always maintained that Chaney's portrayal in The Unknown was the most emotionally compelling film performance he had ever seen an actor give. Chaney also did remarkable and convincing collaborative scenes with real-life armless double Paul Desmuke (sometimes credited as Peter Dismuki), whose legs and feet were used to manipulate objects such as knives and cigarettes in frame with Chaney's upper body and face.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 12:55 pm

34
Oktyabr (October- Ten days that shook the world)
(Sergei M. Eisenstein, 1927)




Officially produced to commemorate the 10-year anniversary of the Russian Revolution, October quickly became another of Sergei Eisenstein's experiments in film form. As in his masterpiece, Battleship Potemkin, Eisenstein uses explosive montage to create the spirit of revolution--in this case, the events in St. Petersburg during the months leading up to the Bolshevik revolt. Eisenstein's insistence on speaking the language of pure film (deploying space, shadow, movement, and rhythm to create his meaning) shoves his mad rush of images straight into the viewer's eye. A worker's rebellion in the streets, followed by the raising of bridges to isolate their neighborhood, becomes a visual symphony of panic. The film has also been known as Ten Days That Shook the World, its release title in the U.S. (borrowed from the book by John Reed). Its value as propaganda can be debated, but October is incredibly dynamic as film art.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 12:57 pm

35
The jazz singer (Alan Crosland, 1927)




The Jazz Singer is a 1927 American musical film. The first feature-length motion picture with synchronized dialogue sequences, its release heralded the commercial ascendance of the "talkies" and the decline of the silent film era. Produced by Warner Bros. with its Vitaphone sound-on-disc system, the movie stars Al Jolson, who performs six songs. Directed by Alan Crosland, it is based on a play by Samson Raphaelson.
The story begins with young Jakie Rabinowitz defying the traditions of his devout Jewish family by singing popular tunes in a beer hall. Punished by his father, a cantor, Jakie runs away from home. Some years later, now calling himself Jack Robin, he has become a talented jazz singer. He attempts to build a career as an entertainer, but his professional ambitions ultimately come into conflict with the demands of his home and heritage.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 1:00 pm

36
Napoleon (Abel Gance, 1927)




Napoléon (1927) is an epic silent French film directed by Abel Gance that tells the story of the rise of Napoleon I of France.
It begins from his youth in school where he already managed a snowball fight like a military campaign, to his victory in invading Italy in 1797. Planned to be the first of six movies about Napoleon Bonaparte, it was realised after the completion of the film that the costs involved would make this impossible.
Ahead of its time in its use of handheld cameras and editing, many scenes were hand tinted or toned. Gance had intended the final reel of the film to be screened as a triptych via triple projection, or Polyvision.
It was first released in a gala premiere at the Paris Opéra in April 1927. Napoléon had been screened in only 8 European cities when Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer bought the rights to the film, but after screening it intact in London, it was cut drastically in length, and only the central panel of the widescreen sequences retained before it was put on limited release in the United States, where it was indifferently received at a time when talkies were just starting to appear.



Última edición por JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:23 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 1:06 pm


37
The kid brother (Ted Wilde, 1927)




The Kid Brother is a 1927 comedy silent film starring Harold Lloyd. It was successful and popular upon release and today is considered by critics and fans to be one of Lloyd's best films, integrating elements of comedy, romance, drama, and character development. Its storyline is an homage to a 1921 film called Tol'able David, although it is essentially a re-make of a little-known 1924 Hal Roach feature, The White Sheep, starring Glen Tyron.



Última edición por JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:54 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 1:08 pm

38
The crowd (King Vidor, 1928)




Directed by King Vidor, "The Crowd" is the story of Johnny. The story follows Johnny's life from birth through adulthood with all the ups and downs that come his way.
Born into modest surroundings, Johnny's father has the highest of hopes for his son but life rarely turns out the way we planned. While we are all significant in the eyes of our family, once you join the real world you are but one of 'the crowd'.
Overall the movie is very sad but is quite riveting nonetheless. One can't help rooting for Johnny but it seems Johnny is his own worst enemy. Impulsive without much thought for the future Johnny continually plows headlong into one mess after another. The girlfriend/loyal wife played by the lovely Eleanor Boardman (who looks a lot like Helen Hunt) stands by her man while her family implores her to leave him.
While the overall plot may sound familiar, the camera work and the performances are outstanding. This is truly one of King Vidor's best films. Silent films, in some ways, are a better vehicle for intense melodrama as there isn't any insipid dialog to muddy the water. The scene where Johnny's child is hit by a car will break your heart.
Some of the camera angles are simply brilliant. One scene in particular shows Johnny's office. It is a veritable airplane hangar with hundreds of identical desks in neat rows and columns. The lonely and isolated sense of being just another face in 'the crowd' is inescapable.
Another interesting aspect of this film is the background scenery. Shot in a big city in the "present day", it is fascinating to see how people lived in the 1920's. Men wore suits and hats, ladies wore dresses. There aren't any body piercings or tattoos. You won't see anyone wearing a raggedy t-shirt or baggy trousers with their rear end hanging out. There isn't any grafitti on the buildings and the streets are clean. It was a different time. A time where manners and propriety still mattered.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 1:11 pm

39
The docks of New York (Josef Von Sternberg, 1928)




The Docks of New York (1928) is a silent film starring George Bancroft, Betty Compson, Olga Baclanova, Clyde Cook, and Mitchell Lewis, which tells the story of a prostitute who tries to rise above her life on the docks by finding love. The story involves a freakishly strong ship stoker (George Bancroft) and the beautiful prostitute (Betty Compson) he saves from drowning.
Directed by Josef von Sternberg, The Docks of New York remains frequently cited by critics as one of the greatest silent films. The dark, gritty beer-hall ambience remains a startling visual treat for modern audiences and the superb acting was acclaimed as a benchmark.
The movie was adapted by Jules Furthman from the John Monk Saunders story The Dock Walloper. In 1999, the film was deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Lun Oct 05, 2009 1:16 pm

40
Un chien andalou (An Andalusian dog)
(Luis Buñuel & Salvador Dalí, 1928)




Un Chien Andalou remains a startling artifact suggesting ways in which film can express the subconscious. The result of Luis Bunuel's collaboration with Salvador Dali, the 17-minute, 1929 film was designed expressly to shock and provoke. Opening with the canonical eyeball-slashing sequence and divided into baffling "chapters", this is a work of art obsessed with religion, lust, decay, violence, and death. Un Chien Andalou isn't simply one of the great works of the surrealist movement, but a segment of cinematic DNA that irrevocably altered the aesthetics of film. In its tangled corridors you find the seeds to the disappearing-mouth bit in The Matrix, the carcasses strewn through Peter Greenaway's A Zed and Two Noughts and pretty much the entire oeuvre of David Lynch.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:02 pm

41
La passion de Jeanne d'Arc (The passion of Joan of Arc)
(Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928)




Carl Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc is as truly mythic as any film ever shot, its artistic achievement rivaled by its turbulent history. The focal point of controversy when released in 1928, the original film was lost for a half-century until an intact copy of Dreyer's original version was recovered in the early '80s.
Seeing Joan of Arc today remains a cinematic revelation, its approach to storytelling, set design, editing, and especially cinematography (by Rudolph Maté, who also shot Dreyer's visionary Vampyr) radical then, and still strikingly modern many decades later. Influenced by both German expressionist film and the French avant-garde, Dreyer's huge set was designed with asymmetrical doors, windows, and arches, through which Maté's camera moves along equally off-centered, even vertiginous, but fluid trajectories. Although the story is epic in its implications, the film is composed primarily of extreme close-ups, especially of Joan and her principal interrogator, Bishop Cauchon, and medium shots of small groups, often shot from low angles. Dreyer and Maté shot their cast in bright light, without makeup, giving each wrinkle, blemish, or tuft of hair sculptural detail.
For all its visual invention, however, Dreyer's film is most devastating in its central performance by Falconetti (née Renee Falconetti), a French stage actress who made her only screen appearance here--one critic Pauline Kael has suggested "may be the finest performance ever recorded on film." Through Falconetti, Joan's spiritual devotion, simple dignity, and suffering become utterly real; even without a dialogue track and only sparse inter-titles, the film achieves a fevered eloquence.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:13 pm

42
Steamboat Bill Jr. (Charles F. Reisner, 1928)




Buster Keaton stars in the story of a college-educated young man who comes home to help his father work on his Mississippi River steamboat and immediately demonstrates just what a landlubber he is. What's worse, the woman he falls for is the daughter of his father's worst rival, a bullying rich guy who wants to drive Buster's boat out of business. Keaton's slapstick is inspired and precise, particularly during an amazing sequence in which he tries to walk across town during a tornado. Watch in amazement as the front of a building falls on Keaton and he walks away without a scratch.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:25 pm

43
Potomak Chingis-khan (Storm over Asia)
(Vsevolod I. Pudovkin, 1929)




The last of the three great films that V.I. Pudovkin directed in the 1920s, Storm over Asia (1928) is an acknowledged classic of Soviet silent cinema. Filmed largely on location in Mongolia, the film has an authentic documentary feel, though the story is a stirring melodrama, about a young fur trapper who is mistreated by the occupying forces in the civil war and becomes a leader of the partisans. Pudovkin enjoys caricaturing the foreign (British) troops and the medieval rituals of a Buddhist temple, but it's out on the steppes that he really comes into his own, with panoramic shots of the vast landscapes. Together with Mother (1926) and The End of St. Petersburg (1927), Storm over Asia (also known as The Heir to Genghis Khan) entitles Pudovkin to be ranked with Sergei Eisenstein and Dziga Vertov as a master of the Soviet montage style, which he expounded in his book Film Technique (1929).


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:29 pm

44
Blackmail (Alfred Hitchcock, 1929)




Blackmail is a 1929 thriller/drama film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Anny Ondra, John Longden, and Cyril Ritchard, and featuring Donald Calthrop, Sara Allgood and Charles Paton. It's based on the play Blackmail by Charles Bennett, as adapted by Hitchcock, with dialogue by Benn Levy. The film, which began production as a silent film, but was converted to sound during shooting, is considered to be the first all-talkie British film.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:33 pm

45
Chelovek s kino-apparatom (The man with the movie camera)
(Dziga Vertov, 1929)




Man with a Movie Camera is an experimental 1929 silent documentary film by Russian director Dziga Vertov.
Vertov's feature film, produced by the Ukrainian film studio VUFKU, presents urban life in Odessa and other Soviet cities. From dawn to dusk Soviet citizens are shown at work and at play, and interacting with the machinery of modern life. To the extent that it can be said to have "characters," they are the cameraman of the title and the modern Soviet Union he discovers and presents in the film.
This film is famous for the range of cinematic techniques Vertov invents, deploys or develops, such as double exposure, fast motion, slow motion, freeze frames, jump cuts, split screens, Dutch angles, extreme close-ups, tracking shots, footage played backwards, animations and a self-reflexive style (at one point it features a split screen tracking shot; the sides have opposite Dutch angles).


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

Mensaje  JM el Mar Oct 06, 2009 6:35 pm

46
Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora's box)
(Georg Wilhelm Pabst, 1929)




G.W. Pabst's Pandora's Box serves as a filmic window into the decadent Weimar Republic because of its tauntingly beautiful star, Louise Brooks. Brooks, encompassing the very essence of sexual allure and mystery, is iconically linked to her character, Lulu, the dancer-turned-streetwalker who captivates all men in her path with her elusive beauty. Set in Berlin, 1928, Pandora's Box is about Lulu, an aspiring star whose patron, Dr. Schön (Fritz Kortner), finds loyalty to his fiancé impossible because of Lulu's unsurpassed charm. Schön's son, Alwa, also falls in love with Lulu until a series of tragic incidents render them destitute in London, where Lulu resorts to prostitution and, in a final devastating scene, picks up her final john, Jack the Ripper. In the silent film era, Brooks's expressive face and graceful movements enabled her to epitomize a Roaring Twenties' version of feminism: innocence underpinned by sexual innuendo. Key scenes in Pandora's Box, such as when Lulu thrills at Dr. Schön's fiancé discovering he and Lulu embraced, or when Lulu's gleaming eyes mimic Jack the Ripper's polished knife blade, are radically risqué examples of all-time seductive cinematic moments. The Criterion Collection's beautifully packaged release of Pandora's Box features a thorough booklet of essays and photos, as well as a biographical documentary about Brooks and an interview with Pabst's son, Michael. After languishing in obscurity for many years preceding her death in the '80s, Louise Brooks will now forever be remembered as Lulu, Hollywood's finest vixen.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part I: Silent era

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