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1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:01 pm

157
Meshes of the afternoon
(Maya Deren & Alexander Hamid, 1943)




Meshes of the Afternoon (1943) is a short experimental film directed by wife and husband team, Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid. The film's narrative is circular, and repeats a number of psychologically symbolic images, including a flower on a long driveway, a key falling, a door unlocked, a knife in a loaf of bread, a mysterious Grim Reaper-like cloaked figure with a mirror for a face, a phone off the hook and an ocean.
The film was the product of Deren's and Hammid's desire to create an avant garde personal film that dealt with devastating psychological problems, like the French avant-garde films of the 1920s such as Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou (1929) and L'Age d'Or (1930). Deren's use of symbolism in her films relates to her father's preoccupation with psychology and her desire to appeal to her father's interests.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:44 pm

158
Fires were started (Humphrey Jennings, 1943)




Fires Were Started (1943) is a British film written and directed by Humphrey Jennings, filmed in documentary style showing the lives of firemen through the Blitz in World War II. The film uses actual firemen (including Cyril Demarne) rather than professional actors.
The film was also released under the title I Was a Fireman.



JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:47 pm

159
The man in grey (Leslie Arliss, 1943)




The Man in Grey is a 1943 English film melodrama made by Gainsborough Pictures, and is widely considered as the first of its "Gainsborough melodramas" (a series of period costume dramas). It was directed by Leslie Arliss and produced by Edward Black from a screenplay by Leslie Arliss and Margaret Kennedy, adapted by Doreen Montgomery from the novel by Eleanor Smith.
It starred Margaret Lockwood, Phyllis Calvert, James Mason, Stewart Granger and Martita Hunt, and melded together elements of the successful "women's pictures" of the time with distinct new elements.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:49 pm

160
The life and death of Colonel Blimp (Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, 1943)




Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's first Technicolor masterpiece, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), transcends its narrow wartime propaganda to portray in warm-hearted detail the life and loves of one extraordinary man. The film's clever narrative structure first presents us with the imposingly rotund General Clive Wynne-Candy (Roger Livesey in his greatest screen performance), a blustering old duffer who seems the epitome of stuffy, outmoded values. But traveling backwards 40 years we see a different man altogether: the young and dashing officer "Sugar" Candy. Through a series of affecting relationships with three women (all played to perfection by Deborah Kerr) and his touching lifelong friendship with a German officer (Anton Wallbrook), we see Candy's life unfold and come to understand how difficult it is for him to adapt his sense of military honor to modern notions of "total war." Notoriously, this is the film that Winston Churchill tried to have banned, and indeed its sympathetic portrayal of a German officer was contentious in 1943, though one suspects that Churchill's own blimpishness was a factor too.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:51 pm

161
I walked with a zombie (Jacques Tourneur, 1943)




Jacques Tourneur's work in general and this film in particular contains the most creative use of lighting in the history of small to medium budget films. Narrative ellipsis, elegance,and modulated low-key performances are the defining characteristics of all the Lewton-Tourneur collaborations of the 1940s. What a meeting of minds and sensibilities must have existed between these two gifted film makers-it's all up there on the screen within the boundaries of RKO's miniscule budgets. This is a truly haunting and mysterious film, Jane Eyre transported to the West Indies with voodoo mysticism in place of the atmosphere of the English moors. J Roy Hunt's creative chiaroscuro and Sir Lancelot's insistent balladeer's chorus help to build a cumulatively uneasy mood which extends to the almost dream-like performances of Frances Dee (the gravely beautiful Mrs Joel McCrea), James Ellison and Tom Conway among others. Tourneur blends all these elements into a poetic tour de force about reason struggling with the unknown.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:53 pm

162
The seventh victim (Mark Robson, 1943)




The Seventh Victim (1943) is a horror film noir starring Tom Conway, Jean Brooks, Isabel Jewell, Kim Hunter (in her first film), and Hugh Beaumont, directed by Mark Robson, and produced by noted film producer Val Lewton for RKO Radio Pictures.
The Seventh Victim may be regarded as an unofficial prequel to Lewton's 1942 film Cat People. Tom Conway's character Dr. Judd appears in both films, and Elizabeth Russell, who plays Mimi, the dying woman, in this film, reappears (in the same clothes) as the unnamed "cat woman" (she also appears as a different character in The Curse of the Cat People).


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Jue Oct 22, 2009 12:54 pm

163
The Ox-Bow incident (William A. Wellman, 1943)




The Ox-Bow Incident is one of the essential Westerns, directed by William Wellman. A study of the effects--and aftereffects--of mob violence, this film (based on a true story) begins with the murder of a popular rancher. Angry townspeople form a posse, find suspects, and, without waiting for a trial, summarily hang them in an expression of biblically tinged frontier justice. But the one cowboy who tried to turn the mob aside ultimately proves that they executed innocent men. Made in 1943, the film features stunning black-and-white cinematography and a solid dramatic sense about what a deadly combination ignorance and self-righteousness can be. Fonda made this film between The Grapes of Wrath and My Darling Clementine, at a point when he was at the peak of his powers as a young actor.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 11:09 am

164
Shadow of a doubt (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943)




Alfred Hitchcock considered this 1943 thriller to be his personal favorite among his own films, and although it's not as popular as some of Hitchcock's later work, it's certainly worthy of the master's admiration. scripted by playwright Thornton Wilder and inspired by the actual case of a 1920's serial killer known as "The Merry Widow Murderer," the movie sets a tone of menace and fear by introducing a psychotic killer into the small-town comforts of Santa Rosa, California. That's where young Charlie (Teresa Wright) lives with her parents and two younger siblings, and where murder is little more than a topic of morbid conversation for their mystery-buff neighbor (Hume Cronyn). Charlie was named after her favorite uncle, who has just arrived for an extended visit, and at first Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) gets along famously with his admiring niece. But the film's chilling prologue has already revealed Uncle Charlie's true identity as the notorious Merry Widow Murderer, and the suspense grows almost unbearable when young Charlie's trust gives way to gradual dread and suspicion. Through narrow escapes and a climactic scene aboard a speeding train, this witty thriller strips away the façade of small-town tranquility to reveal evil where it's least expected. And, of course, it's all done in pure Hitchcockian style.


Shadow of a Doubt (Trailer)

Joseph Cotten | Vídeos MySpace


Última edición por JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:41 pm, editado 1 vez

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 11:14 am

165
Ossessione (Obsession) (Luchino Visconti, 1943)




Ossessione isn't just the finest film version of The Postman Always Rings Twice, James M. Cain's classic tale of murder, betrayal, and erotic obsession; it's also the first masterpiece of Italian neorealism and a key historical precursor of film noir. A handsome drifter (Massimo Girotti) fetches up at an isolated roadhouse, gets mutually besotted with the proprietor's sultry wife (Clara Calamai), and has soon carried out a plot to murder the older man in an apparent off-road accident. That's only the beginning, of course. In his directorial debut, Luchino Visconti weaves a sensuous, tragic spell, born equally of the stark, sun-struck settings--especially those utterly realistic yet somehow otherworldly highways, elevated above the surrounding marshland--and a dynamic camera style that lifts the storytelling to operatic heights. Yet another layer of erotic complication is added by the presence of "La Spagnolo" (Elio Marcuzzo), a philosopher-king of vagabonds who--like the director--is at least as infatuated with Girotti's studly beauty as the heroine is.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:25 pm

166
Meet me in St. Louis (Vincente Minnelli, 1944)




One of the finest American musicals, this 1944 film by Vincente Minnelli is an intentionally self-contained story set in 1903, in which a happy St. Louis family is shaken to their roots by the prospect of moving to New York, where the father has a better job pending. Judy Garland heads the cast in what amounts to a splendid, end-of-an-era story that nicely rhymes with the onset of the 20th century. The film is extraordinarily alive, the characters strong, and the musical numbers are so splendidly part of the storytelling that you don't feel the film has stopped for an interlude.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:27 pm

167
To have and have not (Howard Hawks, 1944)




Yes, it's true: you can virtually see Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall falling for each other in this Howard Hawks variation on Casablanca but adapted from--as legend has it--Ernest Hemingway's self-declared "worst novel." (The story goes that Hawks told Hemingway he could make a movie of the author's least work, and Hemingway gave him the rights to this story.) The script by William Faulkner and Jules Furthman actually makes this one of Hawks's and Bogart's most interesting and often exciting films. Bogart plays a boat captain who reluctantly agrees to help the French Resistance while wooing chanteuse Bacall. Hoagy Carmichael, wry at the piano, adds a delicious accent to an already wonderful mood.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:28 pm

168
Laura (Otto Preminger, 1944)




Laura (1944) is a American film noir directed by Otto Preminger and starring Gene Tierney as Laura, Dana Andrews, Clifton Webb, Vincent Price, and Judith Anderson.
The movie was based on Vera Caspary's Laura, a popular 1943 detective novel, and it was adapted for the screen by Jay Dratler, Samuel Hoffenstein, Elizabeth Reinhardt and Ring Lardner Jr. (uncredited). The film's first director, Rouben Mamoulian, was fired early in the film's shooting due to creative differences with studio head Darryl F. Zanuck.
New York police detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) investigates the murder of a beautiful advertising director named Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney). He interviews acerbic newspaper columnist Waldo Lydecker (Clifton Webb), who relates how he met Laura. Lydecker became her mentor and used his considerable influence and fame to advance her career. McPherson also questions Laura's fiancé, Shelby Carpenter (Vincent Price), her wealthy aunt, Ann Treadwell (Judith Anderson), and Laura's loyal housekeeper, Bessie Clary (Dorothy Adams).


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:31 pm

169
Gaslight (George Cukor, 1944)




George Cukor helped transform a moody Victorian stage melodrama (previously filmed in Britain in 1939) into a gothic Hollywood romantic thriller. Ingrid Bergman stars as a meek, uncertain heiress courted and married in a whirlwind romance by the debonair Charles Boyer, but when they move back into her childhood home she begins losing her grip on reality and becomes convinced that her husband is trying to drive her insane. Joseph Cotten, rather stiff and colorless next to the anguished Bergman and charming and lively Boyer, is the heroic Scotland Yard detective who becomes enamored of the skittish woman who is slowly succumbing to madness. The grand, glorious sets and elegant photography recall Hitchcock's Rebecca, another lush Hollywood gothic melodrama of a retiring young wife overwhelmed by the history of her abode, and Gaslight is still assumed by some to be a Hitchcock film (the Bergman connection doesn't help the confusion). It's really a rather straightforward thriller with a forced plot device, but under Cukor's control the tightly constructed script is given the full MGM treatment, then reined in for intimate moments of harrowing suspense. Boyer brilliantly played off his continental lover reputation by adding an undercurrent of malevolence and Bergman won an Oscar for her haunted performance. It also marks the memorable debut of Angela Lansbury as a saucy maid unwittingly drawn into Boyer's master plan.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:36 pm

170
Henry V (Laurence Olivier, 1944)




If Kenneth Branagh's 1989 version of Shakespeare's tale of conquering greed reflects the post-Vietnam era, Laurence Olivier's version very much mirrored his time. When Olivier gave us his colorful adaptation in 1945, it was vivid, full of pageantry, and most definitely geared toward war. Pretty flags and white steeds, shining armor and theatrical emphasis figure into Olivier's attractive but decorous version, liberally adapted for a pro-war stance. He used the French as comic relief; they appeared foppish and foolish. Their presence implied no threat. If you had not read the play, you would not have to wonder who was going to win. Of course, Olivier wanted England to believe in the justness of war--his country was in the midst of one. The propaganda gets in the way only because it has been filtered through so many decades. His Henry remains, however, a handsome cinematic spectacle. Olivier's performance is gentle and elegant, his imagery rich and colorful. It was considered such a superb film he was awarded an honorary Oscar. He followed this with adaptations of Hamlet and Richard III.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:38 pm

171
Ivan Grozny (Ivan the Terrible)
(Sergei M. Eisenstein, 1944)




Ivan The Terrible (Ivan Groznyy) is a two-part film about how Ivan IV of Russia made by Russian director Sergei Eisenstein. Part 1 was released in 1944 but Part 2 was not released until 1958 due to political censorship. The films were originally planned as part of a trilogy, but Eisenstein died before filming of the third part could be finished.
During World War II, with the German army approaching Moscow, Eisenstein was one of many Moscow-based filmmakers who were evacuated to Almaty, in the Kazakh SSR. There, Eisenstein first considered the idea of making a film about Tsar Ivan IV, aka Ivan the Terrible, whom Joseph Stalin admired, seeing him as the same kind of brilliant, decisive, successful leader that Stalin aspired to be.
The first film, Ivan The Terrible, Part I, was filmed between 1942 and 1944 and released at the end of that year. The film presented Ivan as a national hero, and won Joseph Stalin's approval (and even a Stalin Prize).
The second film, Ivan The Terrible, Part II: The Boyars' Plot, finished filming at Mosfilm in 1946. However, it was not approved by the government, because it depicted Ivan as less of a hero and more of a paranoid tyrant, a parallel Stalin did not appreciate. The film was banned by Stalin, and did not get its first screening until 1958, five years after his death.
The third part, which began filming in 1946, was not completed. All footage from the film was confiscated, and most of it destroyed (though several filmed scenes still exist today).
The score for the films was composed by Sergei Prokofiev.



Última edición por JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:53 pm, editado 1 vez

JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:49 pm

172
Double indemnity (Billy Wilder, 1944)




Director Billy Wilder (Sunset Boulevard) and writer Raymond Chandler (The Big Sleep) adapted James M. Cain's hard-boiled novel into this wildly thrilling story of insurance man Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray), who schemes the perfect murder with the beautiful dame Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck): kill Dietrichson's husband and make off with the insurance money. But, of course, in these plots things never quite go as planned, and Barton Keyes (Edward G. Robinson) is the wily insurance investigator who must sort things out. From the opening scene you know Neff is doomed, as the story is told in flashback; yet, to the film's credit, this doesn't diminish any of the tension of the movie. This early film noir flick is wonderfully campy by today's standards, and the dialogue is snappy ("I thought you were smarter than the rest, Walter. But I was wrong. You're not smarter, just a little taller"), filled with lots of "dame"s and "baby"s. Stanwyck is the ultimate femme fatale, and MacMurray, despite a career largely defined by roles as a softy (notably in the TV series My Three Sons and the movie The Shaggy Dog), is convincingly cast against type as the hapless, love-struck sap.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IV: 1940-1944

Mensaje  JM el Vie Oct 23, 2009 12:51 pm

173
Murder, my sweet (Edward Dmytryk, 1944)




Dick Powell will forever be known as a 1930s crooner in archetypal musical comedies, but this career-changing role shows Powell at his best and remains perhaps the most faithful cinematic representation of Raymond Chandler's hard-boiled hero, Philip Marlowe, ever put on screen. In this adaptation of Farewell, My Lovely, Powell's cynical, smart-talking private eye is hired by a dim ex-con (pug-nosed Mike Mazurki) to find his girl Velma, and by the prissy stooge of a blackmail victim to babysit him during a handoff. The meeting ends with the stooge's death, and Marlowe is immediately engaged by the owner of some jewels, the wily Mrs. Grayle (Claire Trevor), to recover them. As Marlowe navigates the dark, dangerous world of wartime L.A., splitting his search between high-society haunts and the cheap, smoky bars and flophouses of the inner city, he turns up one too many stones, winds up on the wrong end of a fist, and wakes up to a drug-induced nightmare that director Edward Dmytryk delivers with a mixture of surreal symbolism and sinister expressionism. Powell delivers screenwriter John Paxton's snappy lines and droll asides with hard-boiled cynicism, like someone not quite as tough as he talks; but it's Powell's innate vulnerability that makes this reluctant saint of the city so compelling. Dmytryk's shadowy style creates a visual equivalent to the web of intrigue Marlowe navigates, an almost perpetual world of night. One of the first great films noir and an often-overlooked detective-movie classic.


JM

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