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1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 5:54 pm

403
Hud (Martin Ritt, 1963)




Based on a Larry McMurtry novel, this Martin Ritt film was a testament to the sex appeal of the young Paul Newman. Playing the title character--a total rotter who, by the end of the film, has double-crossed or screwed over everyone he knows, including his hard-working father and brother--Newman turns him into an intriguing antihero. Things are tough on the ranch and Hud's dad (Melvyn Douglas) needs help, but Hud is too busy looking out for number one, even as things fall apart. And guess who's going to land on his feet? Beautiful black-and-white cinematography by James Wong Howe won an Oscar, as did performances by Douglas and Patricia Neal.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 6:05 pm

404
Nattvardsgästerna (Winter light) (Ingmar Bergman, 1963)




Winter Light is a 1962 Swedish film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman and starring Bergman regulars Gunnar Björnstrand, Ingrid Thulin and Max von Sydow. Its original Swedish title is Nattvardsgästerna, which translates as "The Communicants." The film follows Tomas Ericsson (Björnstrand), pastor of a small rural Swedish church, as he questions the existence of God and his faith is replaced with doubt, apathy, and anger.
Bergman cited Winter Light as his favorite among his films. It is sometimes considered the second in his 'Trilogy of Faith', the first film being Through a Glass Darkly and the third The Silence.
The film opens with the final moments of Tomas's noon service. In attendance are only a handful of people, including fisherman Jonas Persson and his wife Karin (von Sydow and Gunnel Lindblom), and Tomas's ex-mistress, the atheistic Märta (Ingrid Thulin). After the service, Tomas, though coming down with a cold, prepares for his 3 o'clock service in another town.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 6:09 pm

405
Flaming creatures (Jack Smith, 1963)




Flaming Creatures (1963) is an American experimental film by filmmaker Jack Smith. Due to its surreal, graphic depiction of sexuality, the film was seized by the police at its premiere, and was officially determined to be obscene by a New York Criminal Court. The 43-minute featurette attracted media and public attention, and has been described as a "controversial featurette". This also made Jack Smith famous as a film director across North America. Smith himself described the film as "a comedy set in a haunted music studio."
The film features an array of transvestites, hermaphrodites, drag shows, a sexually ambiguous vampire, a drug orgy and a well-built cunnilingual rapist. Sexual ambiguity is a prominent visual theme, which is particularly shown by overlapping images of flaccid penises and breasts.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Dom Nov 01, 2009 11:26 pm

406
The great escape (John Sturges, 1963)




A stirring example of courage and the indomitable human spirit, for many John Sturges's The Great Escape is both the definitive World War II drama and the nonpareil prison escape movie. Featuring an unequalled ensemble cast in a rivetingly authentic true-life scenario set to Elmer Bernstein's admirable music, this picture is both a template for subsequent action-adventure movies and one of the last glories of Golden Age Hollywood. Reunited with the director who made him a star in The Magnificent Seven, Steve McQueen gives a career-defining performance as the laconic Hilts, the baseball-loving, motorbike-riding "Cooler King." The rest of the all-male Anglo-American cast--Dickie Attenborough, Donald Pleasance, James Garner, Charles Bronson, David McCallum, James Coburn, and Gordon Jackson--make the most of their meaty roles (though you have to forgive Coburn his Australian accent). Closely based on Paul Brickhill's book, the various escape attempts, scrounging, forging, and ferreting activities are authentically realized thanks also to technical advisor Wally Flood, one of the original tunnel-digging POWs. Sturges orchestrates the climax with total conviction, giving us both high action and very poignant human drama. Without trivializing the grim reality, The Great Escape thrillingly celebrates the heroism of men who never gave up the fight.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Dom Nov 01, 2009 11:33 pm

407
Shock corridor (Samuel Fuller ,1963)




Maverick film director Samuel Fuller was doing some of his best work in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and in the years since its release in 1963, Shock Corridor has become a B-movie classic and a prime example of Fuller's gritty tabloid style. Never hesitant to explore the darkened corners of contemporary life, Fuller depicts the chambers of an insane asylum as a microcosm of American society, telling the story of a cynical, ambitious journalist (Peter Breck) whose obsessive quest for a Pulitzer Prize leads him into the depths of madness. To investigate a murder, the reporter goes undercover in a mental hospital, having convinced a psychiatrist that he needs treatment. Once inside the asylum, he pieces together clues to the murder, but his own mind begins to deteriorate until he's trapped in a downward spiral towards insanity. Fuller heightens the melodrama with his aggressive style of filmmaking (his next film, The Naked Kiss, proved even more effective), and his imaginative use of black-and-white cinematography (by noted cameraman Stanley Cortez) fills the movie with raw, emotional power. It's the kind of film one would expect from a rebellious director on the Hollywood fringe, and that's why Shock Corridor remains an enduring low-budget examination of the "rat race" and the consequences of pursuing success at any cost.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Dom Nov 01, 2009 11:48 pm

408
Il gattopardo (The leopard) (Luchino Visconti, 1963)




In adapting the popular novel by Giuseppe Tomassi di Lampedusa (an Italian equivalent to Gone with the Wind, set during the tumultuous Garibaldi revolution of 1860-62), Visconti was initially reluctant to cast Burt Lancaster as the melancholy Prince of Salina--the aging aristocrat "leopard" of the title--who accepts change as inevitable during the struggle for a unified Italy. But Lancaster (even with his voice dubbed in the fully restored Italian release) delivered one of his finest performances, modeled after Visconti himself, and reacting to political and familial upheavals with the wisdom and whimsy of a man who knows that his way of life--and all he holds dear--must change with the times. You won't find a more intimate epic, and Giusseppe Rotunno's masterful cinematography represents the pinnacle of painterly beauty, matched only by the authentic splendor of the film's impeccable production design. The climactic hourlong ballroom scene--which even the hard-to-please Pauline Kael called "one of the greatest of all passages in movies"--is utterly breathtaking. Anchored by Lancaster's performance and the romantic pairing of Alain Delon and Claudia Cardinale, The Leopard is sheer perfection, fully restored to its 185-minute glory.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Dom Nov 01, 2009 11:51 pm

409
Vidas secas (Barren lives) (Nelson Pereira Dos Santos, 1963)




A dog appears on a desolate hilltop. It is followed by the rest of its family: illiterate ranchhand Fabiano (Átila Iório), his wife Vitória (Maria Ribeiro), their two sons (Gilvan and Genivaldo Lima), and a parrot. Baleia the dog hunts cavy, a local rodent that the family eats, and the parrot is itself eaten before we even learn its name. Vultures hover in the trees, and maybe, just maybe, it will rain. A wealthy landowner (Jofre Soares) gives Fabiano a job and then fails to pay him his fair share. One of the sons asks Vitória what hell is, but the family is already there. After filming documentaries in the desert of Brazil's northeast sertão, Nelson Pereira dos Santos returned to make Barren Lives, based on a novel by Graciliano Ramos about an itinerant family in the early '40s. One of the key films of Brazil's socially conscious Cinema Novo movement of the '60s, Barren Lives embodies what another Cinema Novo pioneer, filmmaker Glauber Rocha, called "the aesthetics of hunger." For Pereira dos Santos, there is nothing picturesque or charmingly folkloric about the sertão. Cinematographer Luis Carlos Barreto used high-contrast film stock and unfiltered light to blast the celluloid with sun (the parched ground is often as white as the sky), and the film is scored primarily to the harsh grind of a wagon wheel. Banned in 1964 after a military coup, Barren Lives remains both a stark depiction of poverty and an austere work of art.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Dom Nov 01, 2009 11:58 pm

410
Méditerranée (Mediterranean) (Jean-Daniel Pollet & Volker Schlöndorff, 1963)




Méditerranée (64) is considered the centerpiece of Jean-Daniel Pollet's career. As if to honor the Cahiers assessment of him as “the least predictable” of the New Wave filmmakers, in Méditerranée Pollet made a work that is the very definition of what French critics like to call an ovni or ufo (as in “unidentified filmic object”). This time around, the house was packed with those keen to catch a glimpse of this magnificently strange vessel of sound and image. Méditerranée has been described as being “like a comet in the sky of French cinema,” an “unknown masterpiece,” and an “unprecedented” work that refuses interpretation even as it has provoked reams of critical writing. Its rhythmic collage of images—a girl on a gurney, a fisherman, Greek ruins, a Sicilian garden, a Spanish corrida—is accompanied by an abstract commentary written by Sollers, and only the somber lyricism of Antoine Duhamel’s score holds the film’s elements together. At first viewing, you fear that Méditerranée might fly apart into incoherent fragments. Instead, over the course of its 45 minutes it invents its own rules, and you realize you’re watching something like the filmic channeling of an ancient ritual. The experience is mesmerizing.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:03 am

411
Khaneh siah ast (The house is black) (Forough Farrokhzad, 1963)




The House is Black (خانه سیاه است, Khaneh siah ast) is an acclaimed Iranian short film directed by Forough Farrokhzad.
The film is a look at life and suffering in a leper colony and focusses on the human condition and the beauty of creation. It is spliced with Farrokhzad's narration of quotes from the Old Testament, the Koran and her own poetry. It was the only film she directed before her death in 1967. During the shooting she became attached to a child of two lepers, whom she later adopted.
Although the film attracted little attention outside Iran when released, it has since been recognised as a landmark in Iranian film. Reviewer Eric Henderson described the film; "One of the prototypal essay films, The House is Black paved the way for the Iranian New Wave."


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:08 am

412
The haunting (Robert Wise, 1963)




Certain to remain one of the greatest haunted-house movies ever made, Robert Wise's The Haunting (1963) is antithetical to all the gory horror films of subsequent decades, because its considerable frights remain implicitly rooted in the viewer's sensitivity to abject fear. A classic spook-fest based on Shirley Jackson's novel The Haunting of Hill House (which also inspired the 1999 remake directed by Jan de Bont), the film begins with a prologue that concisely establishes the dark history of Hill House, a massive New England mansion (actually filmed in England) that will play host to four daring guests determined to investigate--and hopefully debunk--the legacy of death and ghostly possession that has given the mansion its terrifying reputation.
Consumed by guilt and grief over her mother's recent death and driven to adventure by her belief in the supernatural, Eleanor Vance (Julie Harris) is the most unstable--and therefore the most vulnerable--visitor to Hill House. She's invited there by anthropologist Dr. Markway (Richard Johnson), along with the bohemian lesbian Theodora (Claire Bloom), who has acute extra-sensory abilities, and glib playboy Luke Sanderson (Russ Tamblyn, from Wise's West Side Story), who will gladly inherit Hill House if it proves to be hospitable. Of course, the shadowy mansion is anything but welcoming to its unwanted intruders. Strange noises, from muffled wails to deafening pounding, set the stage for even scarier occurrences, including a door that appears to breathe (with a slowly turning doorknob that's almost unbearably suspenseful), unexplained writing on walls, and a delicate spiral staircase that seems to have a life of its own.
The genius of The Haunting lies in the restraint of Wise and screenwriter Nelson Gidding, who elicit almost all of the film's mounting terror from the psychology of its characters--particularly Eleanor, whose grip on sanity grows increasingly tenuous. The presence of lurking spirits relies heavily on the power of suggestion (likewise the cautious handling of Theodora's attraction to Eleanor) and the film's use of sound is more terrifying than anything Wise could have shown with his camera. Like Jack Clayton's 1961 chiller, The Innocents, The Haunting knows the value of planting the seeds of terror in the mind, as opposed to letting them blossom graphically on the screen. What you don't see is infinitely more frightening than what you do, and with nary a severed head or bloody corpse in sight, The Haunting is guaranteed to chill you to the bone.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:20 am

413
Yukinojo Henge (An actor's revenge) (Kon Ichikawa, 1963)




An Actor's Revenge (Yukinojo henge), also known as Revenge of a Kabuki Actor, is a 1963 film directed by Kon Ichikawa. The film was produced in Eastmancolor and Daieiscope for Daiei Studios.
The film is a remake of the 1935 film of the same title (distributed in English-speaking countries under the title The Revenge of Yukinojo), which also starred Kazuo Hasegawa. The 1963 An Actor's Revenge marked Hasegawa's 300th role[1][2] as a film actor. The screenplay, written by Ichikawa's wife, Natto Wada, was based on the adaptation by Daisuke Itô and Teinosuke Kinugasa of a newspaper serial originally written by Otokichi Mikami that was used for the 1935 version.
The film follows Yukinojo (played by Hasegawa), a female impersonator who by chance runs into three men who wronged his family decades earlier and decides to exact revenge on them.


Watch [SP] Yukinojo Henge - An Actor's Revenge _ Part 1/4 in Entertainment Videos | View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com

JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:22 am

414
The servant (Joseph Losey, 1963)




The Servant is a 1963 British film, directed by Joseph Losey and starring Dirk Bogarde, Sarah Miles, Wendy Craig, and James Fox. The film was adapted for the screen by Harold Pinter (the first of his three collaborations with Losey) from the novel of the same name by Robin Maugham. It is a tightly woven psychological drama that focuses on the relationships between the four central characters. The intricacies of class, servitude, ennui and Pyrrhic victory are examined and exploded.
Tony (James Fox), a wealthy young Londoner, hires Hugo Barrett (Dirk Bogarde) as his manservant. Initially, Barrett appears to easily take to his new job, and he and Tony form a quiet bond while, nevertheless, maintaining their social roles; however, relationships begin shifting, and they change with the introduction of Susan (Wendy Craig), Tony's emotionally stilted girlfriend, who seems to loathe Barrett and all he represents. Adding to the problems is Vera (Sarah Miles), Barrett's supposed sister, whom Barrett takes into the household as a maidservant; in fact, Vera is his lover.
Nothing being what it seems, the characters manoeuvre around each other until roles reverse and Tony emerges as a very different person. It is a scenario where the major characters appear bored with playing their social roles.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:24 am

415
Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)




Dry as ice, dripping with deadpan witticisms, only Sean Connery's Bond would dare disparage the Beatles, that other 1964 phenomenon. No one but Connery can believably seduce women so effortlessly, kill with almost as much ease, and then pull another bottle of Dom Perignon '53 out of the fridge. Goldfinger contains many of the most memorable scenes in the Bond series: gorgeous Shirley Eaton (as Jill Masterson) coated in gold paint by evil Auric Goldfinger and deposited in Bond's bed; silent Oddjob, flipping a razor-sharp derby like a Frisbee to sever heads; our hero spread-eagle on a table while a laser beam moves threateningly toward his crotch. Honor Blackman's Pussy Galore is the prototype for the series' rash of man-hating supermodels. And Desmond Llewelyn reprises his role as Q, giving Bond what is still his most impressive car, a snazzy little number that fires off smoke screens, punctures the tires of vehicles on the chase, and boasts a handy ejector seat. Goldfinger's two climaxes, inside Fort Knox and aboard a private plane, have to be seen to be believed.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:41 am

416
Scorpio rising (Kenneth Anger, 1964)




Scorpio Rising was a groundbreaking avant-garde, experimental film by Kenneth Anger, author of the Hollywood Babylon books, starring Bruce Byron as the biker Scorpio. It features themes of leather-clad bikers, the occult, Jesus and Nazis. Its camp appropriation of popular culture included an innovative use of pop music, the erotic cult of James Dean, and Sunday comics. The film was produced in 1964 and initially shown on the underground film circuit. The film features no lines of dialogue, accompanied instead by music from popular 50's and 60's artists including Ricky Nelson, The Angels, Bobby Vinton, Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and Martha Reeves & the Vandellas. It is considered to be one of the first post-modern films and an influence to future directors such as Martin Scorsese and David Lynch.
The film was censored for indecency, and the case went to the Supreme Court, where it was decided in Anger's favor.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:43 am

417
Les parapluies de Cherbourg (The umbrellas of Cherbourg)
(Jacques Demy, 1964)




Jacques Demy's haunting romantic musical is an enchanting, one-of-a-kind musical experience. It's basically a movie operetta, in which the characters sing all the dialogue (or, rather, lyrics--by director Demy) to Michel Legrand's lovely score. The story spans five years (1957-1962) in the life of Geneviéve (the ethereally beautiful Catherine Deneuve in the role that launched her to international stardom), the teenage daughter of a woman who owns a Cherbourg umbrella shop. After Geneviéve's boyfriend Guy (Nino Castelnuovo) is drafted and sent off to Algeria, she discovers she's pregnant ... and complications ensue. With its dazzling candy-colored palette, Umbrellas of Cherbourg looks sweet and dreamy. Restored and rereleased in 1995 to rapturous acclaim and the renewed delight of all who got the chance to see it.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:45 am

418
Marnie (Alfred Hitchcock, 1964)




You could call this one Hoot Along with Hitch. With the possible exceptions of Topaz and Family Plot, this is Hitchcock's cheesiest movie, visually and psychologically crass in comparison with a peak achievement like Vertigo--although it shares some of that film's characteristic obsessive themes. Sean Connery, fresh from the second Bond picture, From Russia with Love, is a Philadelphia playboy who begins to fall for Tippi Hedren's blonde ice goddess only when he realizes that she's a professional thief; she's come to work in his upper-crust insurance office in order to embezzle mass quantities. His patient program of investigation and surveillance has a creepy, voyeuristic quality that's pure Hitchcock, but all's lost when it emerges that the root of Marnie's problem is phobic sexual frigidity, induced by a childhood trauma. Luckily, Sean is up to the challenge. As it were. Not even D.H. Lawrence believed as fervently as Hitchcock in the curative properties of sexual release.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:46 am

419
My fair lady (George Cukor, 1964)




Hollywood's legendary "woman's director," George Cukor (The Women, The Philadelphia Story), transformed Audrey Hepburn into street-urchin-turned-proper-lady Eliza Doolittle in this film version of the Lerner and Loewe musical. Based on George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion, My Fair Lady stars Rex Harrison as linguist Henry Higgins (Harrison also played the role, opposite Julie Andrews, on stage), who draws Eliza into a social experiment that works almost too well. The letterbox edition of this film on video certainly pays tribute to the pageantry of Cukor's set, but it also underscores a certain visual stiffness that can slow viewer enthusiasm just a tad. But it's really star wattage that keeps this film exciting, that and such great songs as "On the Street Where You Live" and "I Could Have Danced All Night." Actor Jeremy Brett, who gained a huge following later in life portraying Sherlock Holmes, is quite electric as Eliza's determined suitor.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:48 am

420
Suna no onna (Woman on the dunes) (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)




In addition to being a celebrated milestone of Japanese cinema, Woman in the Dunes is surely one of the most sensual films ever made--not in the purely erotic sense (although eroticism is certainly a potent element), but as a work of pure cinema, in which cinematography and nature combine as powerful forces of artistic expression, melded with a timeless parable of the human condition. Dialogue is sparse and precise, submitting to dreamlike atmosphere and imagery that is genuinely universal; this is the cinematic equivalent of a prehistoric cave drawing, telling a story for all humankind.
Woeful of the trappings of civilization, a young entomologist enjoys solitary fieldwork among the dunes of an oceanside village. Missing his bus to Tokyo, he accepts an invitation to stay in the home of a young widow, whose hut lies at the bottom of an ominous sand pit. He soon realizes that he has been trapped, and that his new role as surrogate husband--helping with the Sisyphean task of shoveling the daily torrent of windblown sand--has been forced on him by a mysterious conspiracy of villagers, who supply provisions from above via rope and pulley. As time passes, the man's initial fury gives way to gradual acceptance, until life in the sand pit seems preferable to attempted escape.
Hiroshi Teshigahara was a 37-year-old novice when he made this film, which received Oscar nominations for Best Director and Best Foreign Language Film. Intimately observing the emotional arc of his characters, Teshigahara incorporates sex, desperation, ingenuity, suffering, pleasure, and much more into this hypnotic visual experience (accompanied by Toru Takemitsu's masterful score), in which sand becomes the third and most dominant character. With images and sequences that are hauntingly and unforgettably evocative, Woman in the Dunes remains a truly extraordinary work of cinematic art.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:51 am

421
Dr. Strangelove or how we I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb
(Stanley Kubrick, 1964)




Arguably the greatest black comedy ever made, Stanley Kubrick's cold-war classic is the ultimate satire of the nuclear age. Dr. Strangelove is a perfect spoof of political and military insanity, beginning when General Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden), a maniacal warrior obsessed with "the purity of precious bodily fluids," mounts his singular campaign against Communism by ordering a squadron of B-52 bombers to attack the Soviet Union. The Soviets counter the threat with a so- called "Doomsday Device," and the world hangs in the balance while the U.S. president (Peter Sellers) engages in hilarious hot-line negotiations with his Soviet counterpart. Sellers also plays a British military attaché and the mad bomb-maker Dr. Strangelove; George C. Scott is outrageously frantic as General Buck Turgidson, whose presidential advice consists mainly of panic and statistics about "acceptable losses." With dialogue ("You can't fight here! This is the war room!") and images (Slim Pickens's character riding the bomb to oblivion) that have become a part of our cultural vocabulary, Kubrick's film regularly appears on critics' lists of the all-time best.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:52 am

422
A hard day's night (Richard Lester, 1964)




The Fab Four from Liverpool--John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr--in their first movie. Nobody expected A Hard Day's Night to be much more than a quick exploitation of a passing musical fad, but when the film opened it immediately seduced the world--even the stuffiest critics fell over themselves in praise (highbrow Dwight Macdonald called it "not only a gay, spontaneous, inventive comedy but it is also as good cinema as I have seen for a long time"). Wisely, screenwriter Alun Owen based his script on the Beatles' actual celebrity at the time, catching them in the delirious early rush of Beatlemania: eluding rampaging fans, killing time on trains and in hotels, appearing on a TV broadcast. American director Richard Lester, influenced by the freestyle French New Wave and British Goon Show humor, whips up a delightfully upbeat circus of perpetual motion. From the opening scene of the mop tops rushing through a train station mobbed by fans, the movie rarely stops for air. Some of the songs are straightforwardly presented, but others ("Can't Buy Me Love," set to the foursome gamboling around an empty field) soar with ingenuity. Above all, the Beatles express their irresistible personalities: droll, deadpan, infectiously cheeky. Better examples of pure cinematic joy are few and far between.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 12:58 am

423
Il deserto rosso (Red desert) (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1964)




Red Desert (Italian: Il deserto rosso) is a 1964 Italian film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. It was written by Antonioni and Tonino Guerra and stars Monica Vitti, Richard Harris and others. It is Antonioni's first color film. The working title was Celeste e verde ("Pale blue and green"). Il deserto rosso was awarded the Golden Lion at the 25th Venice Film Festival in 1964.
Giuliana (Monica Vitti) has attempted to take her life. Although she is married to Ugo (Carlo Chionetti), a plant director, and has a young son, she feels estranged from her relatives and disconnected from the surrounding world. Ugo's friend, Zeller (Richard Harris), who came to Ravenna to make a business deal, pursues her. He seems to understand her troubles better than Ugo, but that is still not enough to alleviate Giuliana's anxiety and tribulations.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:06 am

424
Tini zabutykh predkiv (Shadows of our forgotten ancestors)
(Sergei Parajanov, 1964)




Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (Tini zabutykh predkiv), also called Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors, Shadows of Our Ancestors, or Wild Horses of Fire - is a 1964 film by the Soviet-Armenian filmmaker Sergei Parajanov based on the book by Ukrainian writer Mykhailo Kotsiubynsky. The film was Parajanov's first major work and earned him international acclaim for its rich use of costume and color. The film also features a detailed portrayal of Ukrainian Hutsul culture, showing not only the harsh Carpathian environment and brutal family rivalries, but also the beauty of Hutsul traditions, music, costumes, and dialect.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:10 am

425
The masque of the Red Death (Roger Corman, 1964)




The Masque of the Red Death (1964) is Roger Corman's, and most people's, choice as the best of the Edgar Allan Poe pictures. Masque offers the expected creepy atmosphere and violence against peasants, plus metaphysical ponderings and pointed satanic cruelty. (Corman was operating as much under the influence of Ingmar Bergman as of Edgar Allan Poe.) Nicolas Roeg's color cinematography and Daniel Haller's elaborate production design would be stellar in any Hollywood A-movie; the mono-colored rooms of the prince's castle are a startling effect. Vincent Price is in fine fettle as Prince Prospero, the devil-worshipping sadist who throws lavish parties while the countryside is ravaged by the plague.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:11 am

426
Prima della revoluzione (Before the revolution) (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1964)




This is an early Bertolucci near masterpiece, directed in 1965 when he was 22. It is based on the novel Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal. Its lead character Fabrizio like the novels character has an affair with his aunt. But the movie takes place in the 1960's and instead of fighting with Napolean at Waterloo as the earlier Fabrizio did this Fabrizio toys with communism. Of course anyone who knows Bertolucci knows he himself has toyed with communism(most notably in the film 1900)and the film is perhaps an autobiographical one in part. What prevents the film from rising to a higher level is the theatricality, perhaps artificiality, of certain scenes, but the overall feeling of student idealism is convincing probably because Bertolucci is still young. Fabrizio, like Bertolucci, is more artist than revolutionary and this film is dedicated more to beauty and music and artistic possibility than to social revolution.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:18 am

427
Gertrud (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1964)




Gertrud is a 1964 Danish film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer, based on the 1906 play of the same name by Hjalmar Söderberg. The title role of Gertrud Kanning is played by Nina Pens Rode, with Bendt Rothe as her husband, Gustav Kanning, and Baard Owe as her lover, Erland Jansson.
Gertrud was Dreyer's final film. It is notable for its very long takes, which include a 9 minute, 56 second take of Gerturd and her ex-lover, Gabriel, talking about their pasts.
The film won the FIPRESCI prize at the 1965 Venice Film Festival.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

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