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1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

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1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Jue Ene 29, 2009 6:19 pm

1001 films you must see before you die
Part IX: 1964-1969



431
Vinyl (Andy Warhol, 1965)




Vinyl (1965) is a black-and-white experimental film directed by Andy Warhol at The Factory. It is an early adaptation of the novel A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, starring Gerard Malanga, Edie Sedgwick, Ondine, and Tosh Carillo, and featuring such songs as "Nowhere to Run" by Martha and the Vandellas and "Tired of Waiting for You" by The Kinks.
Vinyl is often credited as Sedgwick's first appearance in film, although she in fact appeared in an earlier Warhol film. Sedgwick has no lines in the entirety of Vinyl, which was filmed unrehearsed and was also performed live in various stage productions.



Última edición por JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 11:05 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Ene 31, 2009 3:37 pm

432
Obchod na korze (The shop on Main Street)
(Jan Kadar & Elmar Klos, 1965)




The Shop on Main Street (Czech/Slovak: Obchod na korze) is a 1965 Slovak, Czech, and Czechoslovak film about the Aryanization programme during World War II in the Slovak State.
The film was written by Ladislav Grosman and directed by Ján Kadár and Elmar Klos. It was funded by Czechoslovakia's central authorities (as were all films under communism), produced at the Barrandov Film Studio in Prague, the Czech Republic, and filmed with a Slovak cast on location at the town of Sabinov in north-eastern Slovakia and on the Barrandov sound stage. It stars Jozef Kroner as carpenter Tono Brtko and Polish actress Ida Kamińska as the Jewish widow Rozália Lautmannová.
The film won the 1965 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, and Kamińska was nominated in 1966 for Best Actress in a Leading Role.
During World War II, a mild-mannered Slovak carpenter Tono Brtko (Jozef Kroner) is offered the chance to take over the sewing notions store of an old, near-deaf Jewish woman Rozália Lautmannová (Ida Kamińska) as a part of the enactment of an Aryanization regulation in the town. As Tono attempts to explain to Mrs. Lautmannová, who is oblivious of the world outside and generally confused, that he has come to be her supervisor and owner of the store, Imrich Kuchár (Martin Hollý, Sr.), a Slovak opponent of Aryanization, steps in and reveals to Brtko that the business itself is less than profitable, as Lautmannová herself relies on donations. The Jewish community then offers the amiable Brtko a weekly payment if he does not give up the store, which would otherwise be given to a new, possibly ruthless Aryanizer. Tono accepts and lets Mrs. Lautmannová believe he is her nephew who has come to help in the store. Their relationship grows, until the authorities round up the town's entire Jewish population for transport, and Tono finds himself conflicted as to whether he should turn in the senile Mrs. Lautmannová, or hide her. When the woman finally becomes aware of the "pogrom" all around her, she panics, and in attempting to silence her, Tono accidentally kills her. The realization devastates him, and he hangs himself.



Última edición por JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 11:07 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Ene 31, 2009 5:59 pm

433
Doctor Zhivago (David Lean, 1965)




David Lean focused all his talent as an epic-maker on Boris Pasternak's sweeping novel about a doctor-poet in revolutionary Russia. The results may sometimes veer toward soap opera, especially with the screen frequently filled with adoring close-ups of Omar Sharif and Julie Christie, but Lean's gift for cramming the screen with spectacle is not to be denied. The streets of Moscow, the snowy steppes of Russia, the house in the country taken over by ice; these are re-created with Lean's unerring sense of grandness. The movie is so lush and so long that it becomes an irresistible wallow, even when logic suffers--like Gone with the Wind before it and Titanic after. Sharif, who achieved stardom in Lean's previous film, Lawrence of Arabia, mostly looks noble, but the supporting cast is spiky: Rod Steiger as a fat-cat monster, Tom Courtenay as a self-righteous revolutionary, and Klaus Kinski and Alec Guinness in smaller roles. Geraldine Chaplin, in her adult debut, plays the doctor's compliant wife. Robert Bolt's screenplay won one of the film's five Oscars, with another going to perhaps the most immediately recognizable element of the movie: Maurice Jarre's romantic music, with its hugely popular "Lara's Theme" weaving in and out of a swooning score.



Última edición por JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:28 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Ene 31, 2009 7:19 pm

434
The war game (Peter Watkins, 1965)




In the mid-'60s, the BBC funded a documentary on how World War III would affect Britain. But the film director Peter Watkins gave them was never aired, and the BBC released a statement saying it was "too horrifying" for television. Despite this, it won an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature, and hit worldwide theatrical release in the coming years. Even today, it has a shocking gravity that is undiminished by time. Using County Kent as the backdrop, a highly effective newsreel style takes the viewer on the Cold War prelude, the attack itself (striking military targets many miles away), and the desperate anarchy that ensues. Subtlety isn't Watkins's suit (perhaps the BBC objected to the film's blunt antiestablishment politics as much as anything), but by breaking taboos such as showing graphic carnage and plausibly depicting the brutal postnuclear martial law, The War Game is a monumental predecessor to The Day After and Testament.



Última edición por JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 11:58 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Ene 31, 2009 9:50 pm

435
Tokyo Orinpikku (Tokyo Olympiad) (Kon Ichikawa, 1965)




The 1964 Olympics in Tokyo were a milestone as much for the intense athletic competition as the joyous commemoration of Japan's recovery following its defeat in World War II. Director Kon Ichikawa (The Burmese Harp, Fires on the Plain) created an epic film of the event, a documentary that covered the entire athletic competition while also capturing the surrounding atmosphere. Early in the film is a stunning aerial shot of Hiroshima, which first shows the devastated area, where destruction from the atom bomb has been preserved, before focusing on a beautiful park where an Olympic ceremony was being held.
The scenes of athletic competition, some of which were shot by cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa (Rashomon), work beautifully on two levels. The camera frames the extreme effort expended by such athletes as the great American runner Bob Hayes, and thus the film functions as a credible sports documentary, yet the camera also goes in for close-ups, lingering on the athlete's muscled forms to provide images that would look perfectly at home on the wall of a photography gallery. The narration in Japanese is accompanied with English subtitles, and this edition retains the widescreen look of the original theatrical release (in a letterboxed format) as well as the complete 170-minute running time.



Última edición por JM el Mar Nov 03, 2009 7:59 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Ene 31, 2009 10:29 pm

436
La battaglia di Algeri (The battle of Algiers) (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1966)




Director Gillo Pontecorvo's 1966 movie The Battle of Algiers concerns the violent struggle in the late 1950s for Algerian independence from France, where the film was banned on its release for fear of creating civil disturbances. Certainly, the heady, insurrectionary mood of the film, enhanced by a relentlessly pulsating Ennio Morricone soundtrack, makes for an emotionally high temperature throughout. Decades later, the advent of the "war against terror" has only intensified the film's relevance.
Shot in a gripping, quasi-documentary style, The Battle of Algiers uses a cast of untrained actors coupled with a stern voiceover. Initially, the film focuses on the conversion of young hoodlum Ali La Pointe (Brahim Haggiag) to F.L.N. (the Algerian Liberation Front). However, as a sequence of outrages and violent counter-terrorist measures ensue, it becomes clear that, as in Eisenstein's October, it is the Revolution itself that is the true star of the film.
Pontecorvo balances cinematic tension with grimly acute political insight. He also manages an evenhandedness in depicting the adversaries. He doesn't flinch from demonstrating the civilian consequences of the F.L.N.'s bombings, while Colonel Mathieu, the French office brought in to quell the nationalists, is played by Jean Martin as a determined, shrewd, and, in his own way, honorable man. However, the closing scenes of the movie--a welter of smoke, teeming street demonstrations, and the pealing white noise of ululations--leaves the viewer both intellectually and emotionally convinced of the rightfulness of the liberation struggle. This is surely among a handful of the finest movies ever made.



Última edición por JM el Mar Nov 03, 2009 11:43 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Dom Feb 01, 2009 1:11 am

437
The sound of music (Robert Wise, 1965)




When Julie Andrews sang "The hills are alive with the sound of music" from an Austrian mountaintop in 1965, the most beloved movie musical was born. To be sure, the adaptation of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II's Broadway hit has never been as universally acclaimed as, say, Singin' in the Rain. Critics argue that the songs are saccharine (even the songwriters regretted the line "To sing through the night like a lark who is learning to pray") and that the characters and plot lack the complexity that could make them more interesting. It's not hard to know whom to root for when your choice is between cute kids and Nazis.
It doesn't matter. Audiences fell in love with the struggling novice Maria (Andrews), the dashing Captain von Trapp (Christopher Plummer), and, yes, the cute kids, all based on a real-life World War II Austrian family. Such songs as "My Favorite Things," "Do Re Mi," "Climb Every Mountain," and the title tune became part of the 20th century Zeitgeist. In addition, The Sound of Music officially became a cult hit when audiences in London began giving it the Rocky Horror Picture Show treatment, attending showings dressed as their favorite characters and delivering choreographed comments and gestures along with the movie.



Última edición por JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:40 am, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Feb 02, 2009 11:15 pm

438
Rękopis znaleziony w Saragosie (The Saragosse manuscript)
(Wojciech Has, 1965)




The Saragossa Manuscript is the English title for Rękopis znaleziony w Saragosie, a Polish film released in 1965, directed by Wojciech Has.
The film was released in Poland uncut at 182 minutes, but it was shortened for release in the U.S. and UK at 147 minutes and 125 minutes, respectively.
During a battle in the town of Saragossa during the Napoleonic Wars, an officer retreats to the second floor of an inn. He finds a large book with drawings of two men hanging on a gallows and two women in a bed. An enemy officer tries to arrest him but ends up translating the book for him; the second officer recognizes its author as his own grandfather, who was a captain in the Walloon Guard. The ancestor, Alfons van Worden, appears with two servants, seeking the shortest route through the Sierra Morena Mountains. The two men warn him against taking his chosen route because it leads through haunted territory. At an apparently deserted inn, the Venta Quemada, he is invited to dine with two Moorish princesses, Emina (Iga Cembrzyńska) and Zibelda (Joanna Jędryka) in a secret inner room. They inform the captain that they are his cousins and, as the last of the Gomelez line, he must marry them both to provide heirs. However, he must convert to Islam. He jokingly calls them ghosts (despite having told his servants with great bravado that ghosts do not exist). Then they seduce him and give him a skull goblet to drink. He wakes and find himself back in the desolate countryside, lying next to a heap of skulls under a gallows. He meets a hermit priest who is trying to cure a possessed man; the latter tells his story, which also involves two sisters and a different kind of forbidden love. Alfonso sleeps in the hermitage's chapel, hearing strange voices at night. When he wakes and rides off, he is captured by the Spanish Inquisition.



Última edición por JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:46 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Mar Feb 03, 2009 12:49 am

439
Alphaville (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)




As the French New Wave was reaching its maturity and filmgoing had evolved as a favorite pastime of intellectuals and urban sophisticates, along came Jean-Luc Godard to shake up every convention and send highfalutin critics scrambling to their typewriters. 1965's Alphaville is a perfect example of Godard's willingness to disrupt expectation, combine genres, and comment on movies while making sociopolitical statements that inspired doctoral theses and left a majority of viewers mystified. Part science fiction and part hard-boiled detective yarn, Alphaville presents a futuristic scenario using the most modern and impersonal architecture that Godard could find in mid-'60s Paris. A haggard private eye (Eddie Constantine) is sent to an ultramodern city run by a master computer, where his mission is to locate and rescue a scientist who is trapped there. As the story unfolds on Godard's strictly low-budget terms, the movie tackles a variety of topics such as the dehumanizing effect of technology, willful suppression of personality, saturation of commercial products, and, of course, the constant recollection of previous films through Godard's carefully chosen images. For most people Alphaville, like many of the director's films, will prove utterly baffling. For those inclined to dig deeper into Godard's artistic intentions, the words of critic Andrew Sarris will ring true: "To understand and appreciate Alphaville is to understand Godard, and vice versa."



Última edición por JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 3:39 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Feb 04, 2009 2:25 am

440
Campanadas a medianoche (Chimes at midnight) (Orson Welles, 1965)




This is Welles' most personal film; deftly editing Shakespeare's Henry IV plays, bits of Henry V and Merry Wives of Windsor, Welles tells the tragedy of Falstaff, the purest good man in all of English drama. The fat knight, who forsakes chivalrous blood-letting for merry cowardice, wine, women and song, represents all the virtues of a pre-modern England to be swept away by his protege, the politic, cunning, war-mongering Prince Hal. When Hal turns his back on Falstaff, who responds "Banish plump Jack and you banish all the world," this is Orson Welles speaking directly to an audience that had banished him since "Citizen Kane." This is his most personal, autobiographical film -- as if Welles stripped off the disguises he'd been wearing for years, let his fat and premature age and alternating gaiety and sadness be exposed to the camera, and truly found himself in Shakespeare.
Shot in Spain in the mid-60's on a meagre budget, but with a splendid cast of UK thespians, Welles here abandoned the pyrotechnic, baroque style of his famous films for a simple, almost John Ford-like elegance. His own performance as Falstaff is the most nuanced, subtle acting he ever did, without mannerism, a subdued and melancholy Falstaff who knows his era is passing. Years ago, I saw a lousy dupe print of this, and it has been out of circulation for years. I have heard its reappearence has been held up in some sort of legal limbo; too bad -- Chimes At Midnight cries out for the restoration that lesser Welles films like Mr Arkadin and Othello have already received.
A final note -- while this movie is notable for its relative simplicity of style, there is one amazing sequence -- Welles' wordless rendering of the battle of Shrewsbury, which begins with chivalric pageantry and ends in slow-motion as knights hack one another to death in the mud; a battle scene that rivals Kurosawa and Eisenstein, and shows that the trickster had a few moves up his sleeve in the twilight of his broken career.



Última edición por JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 11:02 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:04 pm

441
Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)




Roman Polanski was still a newcomer to the world of cinema when he unleashed this unforgettable exercise in skin-crawling terror. Repulsion was the Polish director's first film in English, but that hardly mattered: much of the movie is as wordless (and as weird) as the silent Nosferatu. The young Catherine Deneuve plays a Belgian girl stranded in '60s London, a shy beauty with no social skills. When her sister leaves their shared flat, Deneuve goes gradually, quietly, completely mad. Her world becomes Polanski's paintbox, as the devilish director distorts reality via a series of surrealistic touches (grasping hands that protrude from elastic walls) and out-and-out murderous horror. Very few films cast the kind of eerie spell that this 1965 classic achieves, and it clearly points the way toward Polanski's Rosemary's Baby. As with most of the director's work, what is unsettling is not the overt violence, but the terrifying sense of emptiness and isolation, and the boiling unease inside one's own mind.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:25 pm

442
Giulietta degli spiriti (Juliet of the Spirits) (Federico Fellini, 1965)




Juliet of the Spirits (Italian: Giulietta degli spiriti) is a 1965 surrealist drama film about an Italian housewife, directed by Federico Fellini. Although he first used color in the Temptation of Doctor Antonio episode of Boccaccio '70 (1962), it is Fellini's first feature-length color film.
Giulietta (played by Fellini's wife, Giulietta Masina) explores both her subconscious and the odd lifestyle of her sexy neighbor, Suzy (Sandra Milo), as she attempts to deal with the mundane life and philandering husband (Mario Pisu) that oppress her. As she increasingly taps into her desires, as well as her demons, she slowly gains more self-awareness and, ultimately, independence.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:34 pm

443
Pierrot Le Fou (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)




Ferdinand (Jean-Paul Belmondo) is a man who has married for money and is terribly disillusioned with his life. When forced to go to a dinner party he does not want to attend, he throws a temper tantrum and returns home early. When driving Marianne (Anna Karina), the babysitter, back home, they fall in love and decide to run away from Paris. They embark on a series of escapades that begins with running illegal arms for extra cash and runs the gamut: love, death, ennui, boat chases, murder, betrayal, revenge, lost cash, and almost anything else you can think of, and all with a sense of reality that is an interesting contrast to the typical American film. Jean-Luc Godard (Breathless, Alphaville) blends different genres with great success and achieves moments of cinematic poetry in this quasi-epic of modern malaise. Also a cameo by the Hollywood director Samuel Fuller is something to watch for. Be aware that Godard is for people seriously interested in cinematic art.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:38 pm

444
Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (Russ Meyer, 1965)




Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! is a 1965 film directed by Russ Meyer, who also wrote the script with Jack Moran. It stars Tura Satana, Haji, and Lori Williams.
The film features gratuitous violence, sexuality, provocative gender roles, and campy dialogue. It has become a cult film favorite and has been widely referred to in pop culture. Entertainment Weekly ranked the film #15 on their list of "The Top 50 Cult Films".
It is one of Meyer's more provocatively titled and explicitly exploitative films, yet unlike most of his films, it does not contain explicit nudity.
Three thrill-seeking go-go dancers — Billie (Lori Williams), Rosie (Haji), and their leader, Varla (Tura Satana) — encounter a young couple in the desert while drag racing. After killing the boyfriend (Ray Barlow) with her bare hands, Varla drugs, binds, gags and kidnaps his girlfriend, Linda (Susan Bernard). On a desolate highway, the four stop at a gas station, where they see an old man (Stuart Lancaster) and his muscular, dimwitted son, known as the Vegetable (Dennis Busch). The gas station attendant (Mickey Foxx) tells the women that the old man and his two sons live on a decrepit ranch with a hidden cache of money. Intrigued, Varla hatches a scheme to rob the lecherous old man, who is confined to a wheelchair.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:44 pm

445
Subarnarekha (Golden river) (Ritwik Ghatak, 1962-1965)




Subarnarekha is a Bengali-language Indian film by Ritwik Ghatak. It was made in 1962 but was only released in 1965.
The film tells the story of Ishwar Chakraborty (Abhi Bhattacharya), a Hindu refugee from East Pakistan after the 1948 partition of India. He goes to West Bengal with his little sister Sita (Indrani Chakrabarty) where he tries to start a new life. In a refugee camp, they see the abduction of a low-caste woman and Ishwar takes her little son Abhiram (Sriman Tarun) with him. He gets a job at a factory in the province, near the river Subarnarekha.
After completing his study when Abhiram was asked to go to Germany for his studies, he (Satindra Bhattacharya) and Sita (Madhabi Mukherjee) found that they are in love with each other and want to marry. But at this moment, Ishwar's fear of prejudice emerges, as he does not want his sister, a Brahmin, to marry a lower caste boy. During Sita's wedding with another man, the girl and Abhiram elope and go to Calcutta. Ishwar is angry and heartbroken.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:47 pm

446
De Man Die Zijn Haar Kort Liet Knippen (The Man Who Had His Hair Cut Short)
(André Delvaux, 1965)




A schoolteacher (Miereveld or "field of ants") is entranced by one of his students (Fran). Not being able to have his love fulfilled he tries to escape it and moves house and job. Working for the justice department he is invited by the coroner to join a post mortem examination which leads to an encounter with his former student and the possibility to no longer escape his love.
The theme of escape is very prevalent throughout all facets of this movie. The off-voice narration creates a sort of detachment that reflects the detachment of the character with reality and even with the feelings inside him. Seldom the characters speak while facing the camera and the music is a wonderful accompaniment to the narrative: fairy-like and enchanting or confusing and detached. As the inner feelings and reflections of the characters are the main subject of this movie, it is strongly narrative driven rather than driven by actions and therefor it might not suit every 21st century viewer. But I strongly urge people to allow themselves to follow the reflections and balance on the stream of consciousness of the characters and see where it takes them. Near the end different elements fall into place although it may be a place that not everyone likes or even understands. Strong visuals, strong music, strong acting, but not suitable for a day when you're on the couch struck by the flu.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:52 pm

447
Hold me while I'm naked (George Kuchar, 1966)




About Hold Me While I'm Naked from George Kuchar there was a lot of talk about the way George used light and color and exploited the 16mm saturation of color. Although that was very important to the film, I was more interested in the delivery of the film. George Kuchar was filming a melodramatic sequence which pulled you into the drama effectively. He also showed you his directing techniques in the form of a performance within the film. George combined music and his fantastic exploitation of his directing to execute a hilarious pathos on both himself and his talent. Key scene: George holding the bird on his finger. Cinema's greatest capture of the pathetic nature of sniveling poetics.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 1:56 pm

448
Blow up (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966)




This 1966 masterpiece by Michelangelo Antonioni (The Passenger) is set in the heady atmosphere of Swinging London, and stars David Hemmings as an unsmiling fashion photographer hooked on ephemeral meaning attached to anything: art, sex, work, relationships, drugs, events. When a real mystery falls into his lap, he probes the evidence for some reliable truth, but finds it hard to reckon with. Vanessa Redgrave plays an enigmatic woman whose desperation to cover something up only seems like one more phenomenon in Hemmings's disinterested purview. This is one of the key films of the decade, and still an unsettling and lasting experience.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 2:03 pm

449
Il buono, il brutto e il cattivo (The good, the bad and the ugly)
(Sergio Leone, 1966)




By far the most ambitious, unflinchingly graphic and stylistically influential western ever mounted, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly is an engrossing actioner shot through with a volatile mix of myth and realism. Clint Eastwood returns as the "Man With No Name," this time teaming with two gunslingers (Eli Wallach and Lee Van Cleef) to pursue a cache of $200,000 and letting no one, not even warring factions in a civil war, stand in their way. From sun-drenched panoramas to bold,hard close-ups, exceptional camera work captures the beauty and cruelty of the barren landscape andthe hardened characters who stride unwaveringly through it. Forging a vibrant and yet detached style of action that had not been seen before, and has never been matched since, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly shatters the western mold in true Clint Eastwood style.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:03 pm

450
Sedmikrásky (Daisies) (Vera Chytilova, 1966)




Daisies (Sedmikrásky in Czech) is a 1966 Czech film by director Věra Chytilová. Made with the support of the state-sponsored film studio, it follows two sisters Jezinka and Jarmila, who throughout the film are always engaged in strange pranks as acts of rebellion against the world in which they find themselves living.
The opening sequence is that of a spinning flywheel with shots of aeroplanes strafing the ground. The shots of the aeroplanes are most likely from World War II.
The first scene shows the two main characters sitting in bathing suits. Their conversation is robotic and from that point on they decide to be bad. The next scene shows Jezinka and Jarmila dancing in front of a tree. The tree has many fruits and resembles the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. Once Jezinka eats from the tree, they both fall and appear in their apartment. There is significant action here, with Jezinka looking through the window at a parade and Jarmila eating. The next few scenes are all similar. They show the two girls on a date with an older man, a sugar daddy. Jarmila eats voraciously and Jezinka eventually starts acting like her, eating a lot of food. They eventually go to a night-club, and they outperform the 1920’s style dancers. They also cause a ruckus with the waiters. Jarmila also goes to the apartment of a man who is a butterfly collector. In this scene, there is a lot of butterflies shown as still frames. At the end, she says that she wants to eat. Later on, they go to a factory. There are still frames of locks, and the building looks run down. They look for "nourishment" and stumble upon a feast presumably set out for communist leaders. They eat the food, make a mess and destroy the room. It then cuts to them being dunked in water like witches. They decide to go back and make everything right again, and at the end a giant chandelier crushes them.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:05 pm

451
Da Zui Xia (Come drink with me) (King Hu, 1966)




Come Drink with Me (Da Zui Xia, literally Big Drunken Hero) is a 1966 martial arts-action film directed by King Hu. Set during the Ming Dynasty, it stars Cheng Pei-Pei and Yueh Hua as warriors, and features fight choreography by Han Yingjie.
Widely considered one of the best Hong Kong movies ever made.
A general's son is taken hostage and used as leverage to free a bandit leader. The general’s other offspring, Golden Swallow (Cheng Pei Pei), is sent to rescue the son. When the bandit gang encounter the Golden Swallow in a local inn, the prisoner negotiation escalates to bloodshed and the goons are swiftly defeated.
A local drunk beggar named Fan Da-Pei (Yueh Hua) acts as Golden Swallow's guardian angel, secretly helping her avoid being ambushed at night. That morning Fan Da-Pei, who now we know only as "Drunken Cat" tips off Golden Swallow to the bandits whereabouts. The have taken siege of a Buddhist temple. Under the guise of an acolyte Golden Swallow penetrates the temple and confront the man who's taken her brother hostage. During the brawl she is injured by a deadly poisoned dart. She escapes and is rescued in the woods by Fan who nurses her back to health. While she's convalescing, Golden Swallow learns that Fan is a martial arts master and a leader of a Kung Fu society. Unfortunately, the bandits have allied with an evil abbot, who is the rival for the leadership of Fan's sect. The evil abbot is revealed to be Fan's brother who had inducted him into the Green Wand Kung-Fu school. For both reasons, Fan is reluctant to fight the abbot even though Fan knows about the abbot's criminal deeds.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:09 pm

452
Seconds (John Frankenheimer, 1966)




Rock Hudson stars in this unsettling look at second chances. Banker Arthur Hamilton (John Randolph) lives a comfortable, stifling life until he is contacted by a mysterious caller offering "what every middle-aged man wants: complete freedom." Hamilton, with the help of an enigmatic corporation, fakes his own death and starts over in his new swinging-bachelor persona (now played by Rock Hudson). A change of life, though, is not just a change of scenery, and Seconds, for all its thriller aspects, contains some sad and disturbing meditations on the way we make our own prisons. Director John Frankenheimer uses skewed angles, bizarre close-ups, and fisheye lenses to underscore the film's off-kilter tension, and Rock Hudson gives a performance that is light-years removed from Pillow Talk. Well worth watching twice.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:16 pm

453
In the heat of the night (Norman Jewison, 1967)




Both riveting murder mystery and classic fish-out-of-water yarn, Norman Jewison's Oscar-winning In the Heat of the Night represents Hollywood at its wiliest, cloaking exposé in the most entertaining trappings. Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger prove the decade's most formidable antagonists. Poitier plays Virgil Tibbs, an arrogant homicide detective waylaid in Sparta, Mississippi; Steiger, in his bravura Oscar-winning turn, is Bill Gillespie, the town's hardheaded, bigoted sheriff who first arrests Tibbs for murder and then begs for his expertise. As the clues and suspects mount, Gillespie and his deputies develop begrudging respect for the black officer. The first-rate supporting cast includes Lee Grant as the victim's angry widow, Warren Oates as a voyeuristic deputy, William Schallert as the pragmatic mayor, and, in his screen debut, Scott Wilson (In Cold Blood) as an unlucky fugitive. The brilliant widescreen cinematography is by Haskell Wexler, and the scat-music score is by Quincy Jones. Ray Charles wails the blues theme song.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:19 pm

454
Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf? (Mike Nichols, 1966)




A word of advice: If George (Richard Burton) and Martha (Elizabeth Taylor) ever ask you over for late-night cocktails--pass. On the other hand, if you have the opportunity to see Mike Nichols's scorching film version of Edward Albee's sensational play, don't miss it! Elegantly photographed in crisp black and white by the great Haskell Wexler, the play has been "opened up" for the screen by director Nichols (The Graduate, Primary Colors) and producer-writer Ernest Lehman (North by Northwest) without diluting its concentrated, claustrophobic power. Taylor has never been better or brasher as Martha, letting loose with all the fury of a drunken, frustrated academic's wife on one crazy Walpurgisnacht bender. Burton plays her husband, George, the ineffectual history prof married to the college president's daughter. And George Segal and Sandy Dennis are young, callow Nick and Honey, who have no idea what sort of mind-warping psychological games they're being drawn into. Among the most successful theatrical adaptations (artistically and popularly) ever brought to the screen. The entire principal cast was nominated for Oscars--and Taylor, Dennis, and cinematographer Wexler won.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 02, 2009 10:54 pm

455
Persona (Ingmar Bergman, 1966)




Persona is a movie by Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, released in 1966, and featuring Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann. Bergman held this film to be one of his most important; in his book Images, he writes: "Today I feel that in Persona — and later in Cries and Whispers — I had gone as far as I could go. And that in these two instances when working in total freedom, I touched wordless secrets that only the cinema can discover." He also said that:
“ At some time or other, I said that Persona saved my life — that is no exaggeration. If I had not found the strength to make that film, I would probably have been all washed up. One significant point: for the first time I did not care in the least whether the result would be a commercial success...”
The film explores an encounter between two women: Elisabet a successful actress who has become mute during a performance of Electra, and Alma (soul in Spanish and Portuguese), the nurse charged with caring for her. Some critics have seen August Strindberg’s play The Stronger as a source of inspiration for Persona. Bergman wrote Persona during nine weeks while recovering from pneumonia. During filming Bergman wanted to call the film A Bit of Cinematography. His producer suggested something more accessible and the title of the film was changed.
Persona is considered a major artistic work by film critics and filmmakers. The essayist Susan Sontag is one of many critics who have written extensively about it, calling it "Bergman’s masterpiece". Another critic has described it as "one of this century’s great works of art". In Sight and Sound’s 1972 poll of the ten greatest films of all time, Persona was ranked at number five.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

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