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1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:01 am

481
Faces (John Cassavettes, 1968)




Faces was a 1968 movie, directed by John Cassavetes and starring John Marley, Cassavetes' wife Gena Rowlands, Seymour Cassel and Lynn Carlin, who both received Academy Award nominations for this film.
The movie, shot in cinéma vérité-style, depicts the final stages of the disintegrated marriage of a middle-aged couple. In one night we are introduced to various groups and individuals the couple interacts with after a tense argument and the husband's statement of his desire for a divorce. Afterwards he spends the night in the company of brash businessmen and whores, the wife with her middle aged female friends and a young hippie they've picked up from a bar. The night proceeds as a series of tense conversations and confrontations occur, illustrating where the modern American lifestyle has failed to nourish the interests, love lives, and emotional/spiritual fulfillment of these characters. Nearly everyone we meet expresses deep dissatisfaction with their lives and also a resigned attitude to this malaise. The film offers little hope, only a suggestion that in this world merely understanding that we're unhappy or dissatisfied is a revelation. The film was shot in high contrast 16 mm black and white film stock.



JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:13 am

482
Rosemary's baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)




Psychological terrorism and supernatural horror have rarely been dramatized as effectively as in this classic 1968 thriller, masterfully adapted and directed by Roman Polanski from the chilling novel by Ira Levin. Rosemary (Mia Farrow) is a young, trusting housewife in New York whose actor husband (John Cassavetes), unbeknownst to her, has literally made a deal with the devil. In the thrall of a witches' coven headquartered in their apartment building, the young husband arranges to have his wife impregnated by Satan in exchange for success in a Broadway play. To Rosemary, the pregnancy seems like a normal and happy one--that is, until she grows increasingly suspicious of her neighbors' evil influence. Polanski establishes this seemingly benevolent situation and then introduces each fiendish little detail with such unsettling subtlety that the film escalates to a palpable level of dread and paranoia. By the time Rosemary discovers that her infant son "has his father's eyes" ... well, let's just say the urge to scream along with her is unbearably intense! One of the few modern horror films that can claim to be genuinely terrifying, Rosemary's Baby is an unforgettable movie experience, guaranteed to send chills up your spine.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:17 am

483
If... (Lindsay Anderson, 1968)




Lindsay Anderson’s If.… is a daringly anarchic vision of British society, set in a boarding school in late-sixties England. Before Kubrick made his mischief iconic in A Clockwork Orange, Malcolm McDowell made a hell of an impression as the insouciant Mick Travis, who, along with his school chums, trumps authority at every turn, finally emerging as violent savior against the draconian games of one-upmanship played by both students and the powers that be. Mixing color and black and white as audaciously as it mixes fantasy and reality, If…. remains one of cinema’s most unforgettable rebel yells.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:20 am

484
Memorias del subdesarrollo (Memories of the underdevelopment)
(Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1968)




Memories of Underdevelopment (Spanish: Memorias del Subdesarrollo) is a seminal 1968 Latin American film from Cuba. Directed by Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, the story is based on a novel by Edmundo Desnoes. It was Alea's fifth film, and probably his most famous worldwide. The film gathered several awards at international film festivals.
Sergio, a wealthy bourgeois aspiring writer, decides to stay in Cuba even though his wife and friends flee to Miami. Sergio looks back over the changes in Cuba, from the Cuban Revolution to the missile crisis, the effect of living in an underdeveloped country, and his relations with his girlfriends Elena and Hanna. Memories of Underdevelopment is a complex character study of alienation during the turmoil of social changes. The film is told in a highly subjective point of view through a fragmented narrative that resembles the way memories function.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:24 am

485
The producers (Mel Brooks, 1968)




Mel Brooks's directorial debut remains both a career high point and a classic show business farce. Hinging on a crafty plot premise, which in turn unleashes a joyously insane onstage spoof, The Producers is powered by a clutch of over-the-top performances, capped by the odd couple pairing of the late Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder, making his screen debut.
Mostel is Max Bialystock, a gone-to-seed Broadway producer who spends his days wheedling checks from his "investors," elderly women for whom Bialystock is only too willing to provide company. When wide-eyed auditor Leo Bloom (Wilder) comes to check the books, he unwittingly inspires the wild-eyed Max to hatch a sure-fire plan: sell 25,000 percent of his next show, produce a deliberate flop, then abscond with the proceeds. Unfortunately for the producers (but fortunately for us), their candidate for failure is Springtime for Hitler, a Brooksian conceit that envisions what Goebbels might have accomplished with a little help from Busby Berkeley.
Truly startling during its original 1968 release, The Producers does show signs of age in some peripheral scenes that make merry at the expense of gays and women. But the show's nifty cast (notably including the late Dick Shawn as LSD, the space cadet that snags the musical's title role, and Kenneth Mars as the helmeted playwright) clicks throughout, and the sight of Mostel fleecing his marks is irresistibly funny. Add Wilder's literally hysterical Bloom, and it's easy to understand the film's exalted status among late-'60s comedies.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:32 am

486
David Holzman's diary (Jim McBride, 1967)




Inducted into the prestigious United States National Film Registry in 1991, David Holzman's Diary is a hilarious and well-aimed satire of the cinéma vérité filmmakers of the 1960s. So naturalistic it fooled many an expert, Diary pretends to be the actual, day-to-day life of young filmmaker David Holzman. Holzman plans to film himself and his acquaintances in order to present a documentary about the common man, if the common man were an annoying film-school student whose girlfriend is getting fed up with being surreptitiously photographed, whose draft board is after him, and who is constantly assailed and assaulted on the streets of New York. Completely self-deprecating and ceaselessly entertaining, this is a rare example of self-conscious filmmaking that never takes itself seriously, but never condescends in its humor.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:51 pm

487
Skammen (Shame) (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)




A flawless work (The New Yorker) from Oscar(r) winner Ingmar Bergman, Shame probes the atrocities of warboth internal and externalas a young couple struggles to survive while the world around them crumbles into chaos. On a remote island far removed from a raging civil war, Jan and Eva (Max von Sydow, Liv Ullmann) retreat to their apolitical fortress: a small vegetable farm. But their serene existence is shattered when soldiers violently invade their home. Now caught in the crosshairs of a brutal and inhuman conflict, Jan and Eva become survivors with only one concernto endure.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:55 pm

488
2001 A space odissey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)




When Stanley Kubrick recruited Arthur C. Clarke to collaborate on "the proverbial intelligent science fiction film," it's a safe bet neither the maverick auteur nor the great science fiction writer knew they would virtually redefine the parameters of the cinema experience. A daring experiment in unconventional narrative inspired by Clarke's short story "The Sentinel," 2001 is a visual tone poem (barely 40 minutes of dialogue in a 139-minute film) that charts a phenomenal history of human evolution. From the dawn-of-man discovery of crude but deadly tools in the film's opening sequence to the journey of the spaceship Discovery and metaphysical birth of the "star child" at film's end, Kubrick's vision is meticulous and precise. In keeping with the director's underlying theme of dehumanization by technology, the notorious, seemingly omniscient computer HAL 9000 has more warmth and personality than the human astronauts it supposedly is serving. (The director also leaves the meaning of the black, rectangular alien monoliths open for discussion.) This theme, in part, is what makes 2001 a film like no other, though dated now that its postmillennial space exploration has proven optimistic compared to reality. Still, the film is timelessly provocative in its pioneering exploration of inner- and outer-space consciousness. With spectacular, painstakingly authentic special effects that have stood the test of time, Kubrick's film is nothing less than a cinematic milestone--puzzling, provocative, and perfect.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 12:58 pm

489
Vargtimmen (Hour of the wolf) (Ingmar Bergman, 1968)




The delicate, dangerous line between genius and insanity is brilliantly plumbed in this haunting film from Ingmar Bergman that's "a dazzling flow of surrealism, expressionism and full-blooded Gothic horror" (The Observer). Haunted by demons past and present, artist Johan Borg (Max von Sydow) fights a losing battle to retain his sanity and maintain his artistic prowess. His wife Alma (Liv Ullmann), desperate to help him, finds herself starting to share his hallucinations. But as Johan's mind continues to unravel, Alma is forced to choose between her love and her life.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:24 pm

490
Targets (Peter Bogdanovich, 1968)




TARGETS is a thrilling horror film that follows the story of Byron Orlok (Karloff), an aging horror film star who is contemplating his retirement. Meanwhile, Bobby Thompson (O’Kelly) is a seemingly mild-mannered husband and son whose obsession with firearms is his way of coping with his otherwise mundane life. But, when Thompson suddenly snaps and his harmless hobby turns into a dangerous reality, Los Angeles doesn’t know what hit it as Thompson unleashes undeserved fury upon innocent drivers on the L.A. freeway. And if that weren’t tragedy enough, things take a bigger turn for the worse when Orlok and Thompson’s paths cross as Orlok makes a special appearance at a drive-in theater where Thompson happens to be waiting with his arsenal.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:26 pm

491
Night of the living dead (George A. Romero, 1968)




We can hardly imagine how shocking this film was when it first broke into the film scene in 1968. There's never been anything quite like it again, though there have been numerous pale imitations. Part of the terror lies in the fact that it is shot in such a raw and unadorned fashion that it feels like a home movie, and is all the more authentic because of that. It draws us into its world gradually, content to establish a merely spooky atmosphere before leading us through a horrifically logical progression that we hardly could have anticipated. The story is simple: Radiation from a fallen satellite has caused the dead to walk, and hunger for human flesh. Once bitten, you become one of them. And the only way to kill one is by a shot or blow to the head. We follow a group holed up in a small farmhouse who are trying to fend off the inevitable onslaught of the dead. The tension between the members of this unstable, makeshift community drives the film. Night of the Living Dead establishes savagery as a necessary condition of life. Marked by fatality and a grim humor, the film gnaws through to the bone, then proceeds on to the marrow.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:28 pm

492
Ma nuit chez Maud (My night at Maud's) (Eric Rohmer, 1969)




French director Eric Rohmer, former critic and Cahiers du Cinema editor, created a very special romantic film series around the difficult choices men make when they fall in love with two women called "Six Moral Tales." My Night at Maud's was the third entry, and it was so well received in 1969 that it gave Rohmer international prominence. To this day, it remains Rohmer's masterpiece, a brilliantly insightful and sublime meditation on adult indiscretions. Jean-Louis Trintignant plays a chaste engineer who thinks he's met his soul mate in church (Marie-Christine Barrault), yet winds up accidentally spending the night with the seductive Maud (Francoise Fabian), who is more his intellectual equal. Filmed in stark black and white by Nestor Almendros, this is one of those rare films in which questions about philosophy translate into unexpected answers about the heart. It's slow and methodical, but well worth the experience.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:30 pm

493
Lucía (Humberto Solás, 1968)




Lucía is a 1968 Cuban black-and-white film directed by Humberto Solás, and written by Julio García Espinosa and Nelson Rodríguez. It was the winner of the Golden Prize at the 1969 Moscow International Film Festival.
The film is a period piece, told in three stories in different moments of Cuban history (the Cuban war of independence, the 1930s and the 1960s), all as seen through the eyes of a different woman, each named Lucía.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:41 pm

494
Xia Nu (A touch of Zen) (King Hu, 1969)




A Touch of Zen (traditional Chinese: xiá nǚ) is a 1971 wuxia film directed by King Hu, and made in Taiwan. The movie won significant critical acclaim and became the first Chinese action film ever to win a prize at the Cannes Film Festival, winning the Technical Grand Prize award.
Although filming began in 1969, A Touch of Zen wasn't completed until 1971 and has a running time of over three hours, making it an unusually epic entry in the Wuxia genre.
The story is largely seen through the eyes of Ku (played by Shih Jun) who is a well meaning but unambitious scholar and painter, with a tendency towards being clumsy and ineffectual. A stranger arrives in town wanting his portrait painted by Ku, but his real objective is to bring a female fugitive back to the city for execution on behalf of the East Chamber guards. The fugitive, Yang (played by Hsu Feng), is befriended by Ku and together they plot against the corrupt Eunuch Wei who wants to eradicate all trace of her family after her father attempts to warn the king of the eunuch's corruption.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:50 pm

495
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (George Roy Hill, 1969)




Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a 1969 American Western film that tells the story of bank robbers Butch Cassidy (played by Paul Newman) and his partner The Sundance Kid (played by Robert Redford). The film is only loosely based on historical fact, but it popularized the legends of these Western icons.
The film was directed by George Roy Hill and produced at 20th Century Fox by John Foreman from a screenplay by William Goldman. The music score was by Burt Bacharach with song lyrics by Hal David. Along with Newman and Redford, the film stars Katharine Ross, and features Strother Martin, Henry Jones, Jeff Corey, Sam Elliott, Cloris Leachman, Ted Cassidy, Kenneth Mars and Donnelly Rhodes.
Butch Cassidy and Sundance Kid, the leaders of the famous Hole in the Wall Gang, are planning another bank robbery. As they return to their hideout in Hole-in-the-Wall, they find out that the gang has selected a new leader, Harvey Logan. He challenges Butch to a knife fight, which Butch wins, using a ruse. Logan had the idea to rob the Union Pacific Flyer instead of banks. He wanted to rob it twice, the idea being that the return would be considered safe and therefore more money might be involved. Butch takes this idea as his own.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:52 pm

496
Midnight cowboy (John Schlesinger, 1969)




The first, and only, X-rated film to win a best picture Academy Award, John Schlesinger's Midnight Cowboy seems a lot less daring today (and has been reclassified as an R), but remains a fascinating time capsule of late-1960s sexual decadence in mainstream American cinema. In a career-making performance, Jon Voight plays Joe Buck, a naive Texas dishwasher who goes to the big city (New York) to make his fortune as a sexual hustler. Although enthusiastic about selling himself to rich ladies for stud services, he quickly finds it hard to make a living and eventually crashes in a seedy dump with a crippled petty thief named Ratzo Rizzo (Dustin Hoffman, doing one of his more effective "stupid acting tricks," with a limp and a high-pitch rasp of a voice). Schlesinger's quick-cut, semi-psychedelic style has dated severely, as has his ruthlessly cynical approach to almost everybody but the lead characters. But at its heart the movie is a sad tale of friendship between a couple of losers lost in the big city, and with an ending no studio would approve today. It's a bit like an urban Of Mice and Men, but where both guys are Lenny.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:53 pm

497
Satyricon (Federico Fellini, 1969)




Trippy is as trippy does, even when you're talking about a movie set in ancient Rome. This 1969 Fellini opus was among the most visually arresting entries in a year when the psychedelic experience was trying to claw its way into every movie coming down the pike. But Fellini, in telling a negligible story about two young men tasting the various pleasures of Nero's hedonistic and priapic reign, aimed for images that jarred as well as seduced. He found humor in freakishness, contrasting beauty and ugliness while effortlessly passing judgment on the emptiness of a life devoted to sensation and personal freedom. More of a fever dream than a linear story, Fellini Satyricon crystallized the director's reputation as a visionary--but may have trapped him into spending the rest of his career (with the exception of Amarcord) trying to top himself in reaching new levels of outrageousness.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 1:55 pm

498
Z (Costa-Gavras, 1969)




Costa-Gavras's Z, winner of the 1970 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, is a classic political thriller, combining intrigue with raw emotional power. The story turns on the investigation of the assassination of a left-wing Greek politician (Yves Montand), and his government's attempts to cover up the murky circumstances. Montand receives death threats as he prepares to give a speech condemning the government, and is then run down in front of numerous witnesses. Jean-Louis Trintignant (The Conformist) plays the judge assigned to the investigation, who gradually discovers how far the state will go to rid itself of political opposition. As he is warned off the case by his superiors, the judge becomes even more determined to discover the truth, no matter where it might lead. Costa-Gavras (Missing, Mad City) is in familiar territory here, but no one handles this type of material better. Z is a classic of political intrigue and social consciousness.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 3:12 pm

499
Il conformista (The conformist) (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1969)




The Conformist (Italian: Il conformista) (1970) is a political film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. The screenplay was written by Bertolucci based on the novel The Conformist (1951) by Alberto Moravia. The film features Jean-Louis Trintignant, Stefania Sandrelli, among others.
The picture was a co-production of Italian, French, and West German film companies.
The drama serves as an analysis of the Fascist mentality which explores a sexual motivation. Marcello Clerici is an Italian who spends his life accommodating others and joins the Italian Fascist party as a way of disappearing into the crowd so that he can "belong." Bertolucci makes use of the 1930s art and decor associated with the Fascist mentality and era: the middle-class drawing rooms and the huge halls of the ruling elite.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 3:14 pm

500
Easy rider (Dennis Hopper, 1969)




This box-office hit from 1969 is an important pioneer of the American independent cinema movement, and a generational touchstone to boot. Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper play hippie motorcyclists crossing the Southwest and encountering a crazy quilt of good and bad people. Jack Nicholson turns up in a significant role as an attorney who joins their quest for awhile and articulates society's problem with freedom as Fonda's and Hopper's characters embody it. Hopper directed, essentially bringing the no-frills filmmaking methods of legendary, drive-in movie producer Roger Corman (The Little Shop of Horrors) to a serious feature for the mainstream. The film can't help but look a bit dated now (a psychedelic sequence toward the end particularly doesn't hold up well), but it retains its original power, sense of daring, and epochal impact.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 3:23 pm

501
High school (Frederick Wiseman, 1968)




High School is a 1968 direct cinema documentary film which follows the typical day of a group of students at their high school (Northeast High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.)
It was one of the first direct cinema (or cinéma vérité) documentaries. This film was actually banned from being shown in Philadelphia for a number of years due to the way it depicted high schoolers as being oppressed, although the students, faculty, and administrators in the film all attested after the first screening of the film that they were shown in an accurate light.
The movie was directed by Frederick Wiseman and was selected in 1991 for preservation in the National Film Registry.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 3:31 pm

502
In the year of the pig (Emile De Antonio, 1968)




Both sober and sobering, producer-director Emile de Antonio’s In the Year of the Pig is a powerful and, no doubt for many, controversial documentary about the Vietnam War. But although the 1968 film ultimately focuses on the United States' participation in that ill-fated venture, de Antonio provides a considerably broader historical perspective; indeed, a good portion of its 103 minutes traces the 20th Century history of Southeast Asia, including French colonialism and the rise to power of Ho Chi Minh (described by one U.S. Senator as "the George Washington of his country") as the Communist leader of North Vietnam. Combining extensive file footage with de Antonio's own interviews with a variety of political and military talking heads, In the Year of the Pig goes on to deliver a clear indictment of U.S. policy and tactics in Vietnam, beginning with America's purely "technical" role in 1954 ("We are sending planes, but no pilots," says one general) and continuing through its support of the corrupt Diem regime in the mid-'60s, President Lyndon Johnson's steady escalation of U.S. military involvement, and the growing opposition to the war effort here at home. Yet while De Antonio's doesn't hide his anti-war point of view, this will never be mistaken for a Michael Moore documentary; there's little in the way of sensationalism or humor, and rather than confront his targets in person and onscreen, a la Moore, de Antonio simply gives them enough rope with which to hang themselves.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 9:21 pm

503
The wild bunch (Sam Peckinpah, 1969)




One of the best action movies ever made, in a cleaned-up print restoring crucial parts of the story. No cavalry ever rode in with more epochal impact than the Wild Bunch in the legendary opening scene. Their steel-eyed leader, Pike (William Holden), and his robbers in stolen army uniforms help an old lady across the street, and then spark a massacre led by Pike's old crony Thornton (Robert Ryan), sprung from jail to hunt down his old gang. In just a few minutes, Sam Peckinpah sets the scene--a dusty Texas town in 1913--sketches a dozen vividly individualized characters, and choreographs one of the most realistic, influential, brilliantly photographed shootouts under the pitiless sun. The cast is superb (even Ernest Borgnine!), the dialog crackling, the bitterly ambiguous moral of the story hard-earned. It's the deeper, dark flip side to 1969's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.


JM

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Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 10:26 pm

504
Andrei Rublev (Andrei Tarkovski, 1966)




Andrei Rublev, also known as The Passion According to Andrei, is a 1966 Russian film directed by Andrei Tarkovsky from a screenplay written by Andrei Konchalovsky and Andrei Tarkovsky. The film is loosely based on the life of Andrei Rublev, the great 15th century Russian icon painter. The film features Anatoly Solonitsyn, Nikolai Grinko, Ivan Lapikov, Nikolai Sergeyev, Nikolai Burlyayev and Tarkovsky's wife Irma Raush.
Andrei Rublev is set against the background of 15th century Russia. Although the film is only loosely based on the life of Andrei Rublev, its depiction of medieval Russia is realistic. Tarkovsky created a film that shows the artist as "a world-historic figure" and "Christianity as an axiom of Russia’s historical identity" during a turbulent period of Russian history, that ultimately resulted in the Tsardom of Russia. The film is about the essence of art and the importance of faith and shows an artist who tries to find the appropriate response to the tragedies of his time. The film is also about artistic freedom and the possibility and necessity of making art for, and in the face of, a repressive authority and its hypocrisy, technology and empiricism, by which knowledge is acquired on one's own without reliance on authority, and the role of the individual, community, and government in the making of both spiritual and epic art.
Because of the films's religious themes and political ambiguity, it was unreleased in the atheistic and authoritarian Soviet Union for years after it was completed, except for a single screening in Moscow. A cut version of the film was shown at the Cannes Film Festival in 1969, where it won the FIPRESCI prize. In 1971 a censored version of the film released in the Soviet Union. The film was further cut for commercial reasons upon release in the US in 1973. Because of this several versions of the film exist. Today Andrei Rublev is widely regarded as a masterpiece and one of Tarkovsky's best works.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 10:42 pm

505
Le boucher (The butcher) (Claude Chabrol, 1969)




This 1969 masterpiece by Claude Chabrol is a high point of the French New Wave director's mid-career, as well as that of actress Stephane Audran, Chabrol's then-wife. Audran plays a lonely schoolteacher who develops an inexplicable draw toward an ex-army butcher (Jean Yanne) who may or may not be a serial killer plaguing a small town. Drawing on Hitchcockian themes of exchanged guilt and shared secrets, Chabrol constructs an extraordinary relationship between the two characters that marries unspoken self-awareness with constant suspense over the unresolved nature of their bond. The film becomes so responsive to their tiny, meaningful gestures, their pregnant silences, and the comic-tragic synchronicity of their insulated world that the mere blinking of an elevator light speaks volumes about the hell of privileged knowledge. Le Boucher returned Chabrol to the backdrop of the French provinces, which he had visited before in his debut, Le Beau Serge, and later in La Ceremonie.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part IX: 1965-1969

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