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1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

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1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Feb 05, 2009 11:29 pm

1001 films you must see before you die
Part X: 1970-1974



508
Tristana (Luis Buñuel, 1970)




Tristana (1970), by Luis Buñuel, is a film based upon the eponymous novel by Benito Pérez Galdós, featuring Catherine Deneuve and Fernando Rey and shot in Toledo (Spain). In the U.S., it was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The voices of French actress Catherine Deneuve and Italian actor Franco Nero were dubbed to Spanish. Tristana is Spanish-Franco-Italian co-production.
Tristana is an orphan adopted by nobleman Don Lope Garrido. Don Lope falls in love with her and thus treats her as daughter and wife from the age of nineteen, a bit of a scandal, but, by age twenty-one Tristana starts finding her voice, to demand to study music, art and other subjects with which she wishes to become independent. She meets the young artist Horacio Díaz, falls in love, and eventually leaves Toledo to live with him.
Here, the film varies from the novel, wherein she sees him as a possible means of leaving Don Lópe's house, but never lives with Horacio. When she falls ill, she returns to Don Lópe. The illness results in her losing a leg, which changes her prospects; here, the film substantially varies from the novel.




Última edición por JM el Sáb Nov 07, 2009 8:22 pm, editado 6 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Feb 07, 2009 5:12 pm

509
Five easy pieces (Bob Rafelson, 1970)




This subtle, existential character study of an emotionally distant outcast (Nicholson) forced to confront his past failures remains an intimate cornerstone of American '70s cinema. Written and directed with remarkable restraint by Bob Rafelson, the film is the result of a short-lived partnership between the filmmaker and Nicholson--the first was the zany formalist exercise, Head, while the equally impressive King of Marvin Gardens followed Five Easy Pieces. Quiet and full of long, controlled takes, this film draws its strength from the acutely detailed, nonjudgmental observations of its complex protagonist, Robert Dupea--an extremely crass and frustrated oil worker, and failed child pianist hiding from his past in Texas. Dupea spends his life drinking beer and sleeping with (and cheating on) his annoying but adoring Tammy Wynette-wannabe girlfriend, but when he learns that his father is dying in Washington State, he leaves. After the film transforms into a spirited road movie, and arrives at the eccentric upper-class Dupea family mansion, it becomes apparent that leaving is what Dupea does best--from his problems, fears, and those who love him. Nicholson gives a difficult yet masterful performance in an unlikable role, one that's full of ambiguity and requires violent shifts in acting style. Several sequences--such as his stopping traffic to play piano, or his famous verbal duels with a cranky waitress over a chicken-salad sandwich--are Nicholson landmarks. Yet, it's the quieter moments, when Dupea tries miserably to communicate and reconcile with his dying father, where the actor shows his real talent--and by extension, shows us the wounded little boy that lurks in the shell of the man Dupea has become.



Última edición por JM el Sáb Nov 07, 2009 8:26 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Feb 07, 2009 11:25 pm

510
El topo (The mole) (Alejandro Jodorowsky, 1970)




El Topo's surrealism is more slapstick than Jodorwosky's brilliant follow-up, Holy Mountain, making it more akin to a spaghetti western than a psychedelic journey through the subconscious. The director stars as the gunfighter, El Topo (The Mole), who first gives his 7-year old son (played by real life son, Brontis Jodorowsky) a glimpse of manhood in the form of weaponry, then abandons him for a horseback revenge trip focused on a heartless team of raping, pillaging bandits. Along the way, he meets Mara (Mara Lorenzio), whose tough love encourages him to become a monk. On El Topo's new quest, he encounters spiritual leaders and endures a series of personal realizations about his past violence. Absurd moments, such as when the viewer first encounters the bandits sniffing and drooling over high-heeled women's shoes out in the desert, make El Topo satirically wry. Brutal scenes in which rivers of blood run through towns, or people slaughter each other in firing lines, remind the viewer of Mexico's bloody history. The mixture of ironic humor and violence in El Topo encapsulates Jodorowky's vision of a world in which reality and the imagination are fused, yet completely separate. This paradox, of great thematic concern in all of Jodorowsky's films, is most resonant in El Topo when Mara and The Mole sadistically communicate with whips, guns, and knives. As Holy Mountain's religious message centers wholly around The Alchemist's transformation of Jesus, El Topo introduces love between man and woman into the symbolic mix, compensating for the divine settings and imaginative characters that elucidate the protagonist's enlightenment in the later Holy Mountain. Only by viewing the two films as a double feature will one get the full power of Jodorowsky's Buddhist message, one of self-sacrifice and suffering towards a greater end.



Última edición por JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:11 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Lun Feb 09, 2009 10:14 pm

511
Woodstock (Michael Wadleigh, 1970)




The three-day Woodstock music festival in 1969 was the pivotal event of the 1960s peace movement, and this landmark concert film is the definitive record of that milestone of rock & roll history. It's more than a chronicle of the hippie movement, however; this is a film of genuine historical and social importance, capturing the spirit of America in transition, when the Vietnam War was at its peak and antiwar protest was fully expressed through the liberating music of the time. With a brilliant crew at his disposal (including a young editor named Martin Scorsese), director Michael Wadleigh worked with over 300 hours of footage to create his original 225-minute director's cut, which was cut by 40 minutes for the film's release in 1970. Eight previously edited segments were restored in 1994, and the original director's cut of Woodstock is now the version most commonly available on videotape and DVD.
The film deservedly won the Academy Award for Best Documentary, and it's still a stunning achievement. Abundant footage taken among the massive crowd ("half a million strong") expresses the human heart of the event, from skinny-dipping hippies to accidental overdoses, to unpredictable weather, midconcert childbirth, and the thoughtful (or just plain rambling) reflections of the festive participants. Then, of course, there is the music--a nonstop parade of rock & roll from the greatest performers of the period, including Crosby, Stills, and Nash, Canned Heat, The Who, Richie Havens, Joan Baez, Ten Years After, Sly & The Family Stone, Santana, and many more. Watching this ambitious film, as the saying goes, is the next best thing to being there--it's a time-travel journey to that once-in-a-lifetime event.



Última edición por JM el Vie Nov 06, 2009 1:04 am, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Lun Feb 09, 2009 10:45 pm

512
Deep End (Jerzy Skolimowski, 1971)




Deep End is a 1971 movie directed by Jerzy Skolimowski featuring Jane Asher and John Moulder Brown. The film is set in the suburbs of London.
After the school Mike (John Moulder Brown), a 15 year old boy, finds a job in a public bathhouse. There he meets the slightly older Susan (Jane Asher), a provocative girl that soon invades Mike's fantasies. Working in the bathhouse he will soon be molested by older women willing to have pleasure from him in exchange for bigger tips: Susan will reveal him that this is normality there. Mike's obsession for Susan will soon grow, leading him to follow her in the night. Several episodes reveal this obsession: he tries to touch her breasts from behind when she is at the cinema with her boyfriend, watching an adult movie, and he is shocked when he finds a portrait of her in front of a strip-house. He steals the portrait and, after a fight with Susan, he will deep in the public bath's swimming pool during the night, simulating sexual intercourse with the portrait. After a fight in the woods, Susan will lose the diamond from her engagement ring in the snow: Mike helps her collecting the snow where the diamond might be and then they go to the baths to melt it, in order to find the diamond. Mike finds the diamond when Susan is at the phone and lays down naked in the dry pool, the diamond on his tongue. He then gives the diamond to Susan, she undresses and they have sexual intercourse in the dried pool. She then stands up and starts dressing so that Mike goes crazy, shouting to her to stay and not to go with her boyfriend. In the ending sequence, Mike throws a ceiling lamp at her: the lamp hurts her head and she falls unconscious while the swimming pool is being filled with water turning red for a tin of red paint knocked over when Mike threw the ceiling lamp. The movie ends with Mike swimming with the unconscious Susan, both naked.



Última edición por JM el Vie Nov 06, 2009 12:49 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Lun Feb 09, 2009 11:02 pm

513
La strategia del ragno (The spider's stratagem) (Bernardo Bertolucci, 1970)




Definitely one of Bernardo Bertolucci's best films! The combination of beautiful music, wonderful photography by Vittorio Storaro, and great acting by Giulio Brogi and Alida Villi, and Bertolucci's top notch directing make this a must for film lovers everywhere! Not just Bertolucci fans will only be able to notice the sheer beauty of this film with it's wonderful colors and photography. The screenplay written by Eduardo de Gregorio, Marilu Parolini, and Bertolucci himself is full of intrigue and mystery. It deals with Athos Magnani jr (Brogi) returning to his hometown where his father was a anti-facist, who was murdered, and is now considered a hero. He meets a woman there (Villi) who he finds out was his father's mistress, Draifa. He soon begins to investigate his father's murder, untill the whole town turns against him. Everyone he meets show's nothing but hostillity towards him, wanting him to leave. Soon he finds himself trapped in a "spider's web" of intrigue that tanges history and fiction, hero and tritor, and past and present. This is a film not only Bertolucci fans should watch but filmbuffs, foreign film fans, a movie goers everywhere. A masterpiece by Bernardo Bertolucci.



Última edición por JM el Vie Nov 06, 2009 1:26 pm, editado 1 vez

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Mar Feb 10, 2009 11:07 pm

514
Little Big Man (Arthur Penn, 1970)




Jack Crabb is the only white survivor of the Battle of Little Big Horn and the centenarian shares his story in this picaresque fable of the Old West. In Arthur Penn's adaptation of Thomas Berger's novel, Dustin Hoffman plays Jack from teen years into old age in a bravura performance. And Jack's story is a fantastic one: captured by Indians as a boy, reared as an Indian, shuttling back and forth between the white and Indian worlds. In the process, he befriends everyone from Wild Bill Hickock to George Armstrong Custer and is a gunslinger, a snake-oil salesman, and an Army scout. This is a solid blend of comedy and tragedy, with a strong statement to make about America's treatment of Native Americans without sermonizing. A terrific cast includes Faye Dunaway, Martin Balsam, and Richard Mulligan. But this show is all Hoffman's.



Última edición por JM el Vie Nov 06, 2009 3:15 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Feb 12, 2009 9:16 pm

515
Ucho (The ear) (Karel Kachyna, 1970)




Ucho (The Ear) is a Czech language film by Karel Kachyňa, completed in 1970.
The film is about a bitter married couple that consists of Ludvik, a senior official of Prague's ruling Communist regime, and his alcoholic wife Anna. They return home after attending a political party dinner and notice their home has been broken into. Several strange occurrences, including the disappearance of their spare house keys and dead phone lines, lead them to believe that they under surveillance by their own government. As the night progresses, the flaws of their marriage and of each other is exposed.
This film was withheld from circulation by the nation's ruling Communist party (who were supported by the occupying Soviet forces). It wasn't released until late 1989, around the time of Czechoslovakia's first democratic elections in over 40 years.



Última edición por JM el Vie Nov 06, 2009 9:40 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Feb 14, 2009 2:41 pm

516
Patton (Franklin J. Schaffner, 1970)




One of the greatest screen biographies ever produced, this monumental film runs nearly three hours, won seven Academy Awards, and gave George C. Scott the greatest role of his career. It was released in 1970 when protest against the Vietnam War still raged at home and abroad, and many critics and moviegoers struggled to reconcile current events with the movie's glorification of Gen. George S. Patton as a crazy-brave genius of World War II.
How could a movie so huge in scope and so fascinated by its subject be considered an anti-war film? The simple truth is that it's not--Patton is less about World War II than about the rise and fall of a man whose life was literally defined by war, and who felt lost and lonely without the grand-scale pursuit of an enemy. George C. Scott embodies his role so fully, so convincingly, that we can't help but be drawn to and fascinated by Patton as a man who is simultaneously bound for hell and glory. The film's opening monologue alone is a masterful display of acting and character analysis, and everything that follows is sheer brilliance on the part of Scott and director Franklin J. Schaffner.
Filmed on an epic scale at literally dozens of European locations, Patton does not embrace war as a noble pursuit, nor does it deny the reality of war as a breeding ground for heroes. Through the awesome achievement of Scott's performance and the film's grand ambition, Patton shows all the complexities of a man who accepted his role in life and (like Scott) played it to the hilt.



Última edición por JM el Sáb Nov 07, 2009 12:34 pm, editado 3 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Feb 14, 2009 3:35 pm

517
M.A.S.H. (Robert Altman, 1970)




It's set during the Korean War, in a mobile army surgical hospital. But no one seeing M*A*S*H in 1970 confused the film for anything but a caustic comment on the Vietnam War; this is one of the counterculture movies that exploded into the mainstream at the end of the '60s. Director Robert Altman had labored for years in television and sporadic feature work when this smash-hit comedy made his name (and allowed him to create an astonishing string of offbeat pictures, culminating in the masterpiece Nashville). Altman's style of cruel humor, overlapping dialogue, and densely textured visuals brought the material to life in an all-new kind of war movie (or, more precisely, antiwar movie). Audiences had never seen anything like it: vaudeville routines played against spurting blood, fueled with open ridicule of authority. The cast is led by Elliott Gould and Donald Sutherland, as the outrageous surgeons Hawkeye Pierce and Trapper John McIntyre, with Robert Duvall as the uptight Major Burns and Sally Kellerman in an Oscar-nominated role as nurse "Hot Lips" Houlihan. The film's huge success spawned the long-running TV series, a considerably softer take on the material; of the film's cast, only Gary Burghoff repeated his role on the small screen, as the slightly clairvoyant Radar O'Reilly.



Última edición por JM el Sáb Nov 07, 2009 8:18 pm, editado 2 veces

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 04, 2009 11:59 pm

518
Performance (Donald Cammell & Nicolas Roeg, 1970)




Performance is a British film made in 1968 but not released until 1970. It was directed by Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg, and stars James Fox and Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones in his film acting debut.
Chas (James Fox) is a "performer," a violent enforcer for an East London gang led by Harry Flowers (Johnny Shannon). Chas' insubordination leads Flowers to send some hitmen to punish Chas for his impudence. After they torture Chas, he murders one of them, Joey Maddocks (Anthony Valentine). As a result, Chas goes on the run, both from the police and from his former colleagues, and dyes his hair red. Overhearing that a musician tenant is being evicted for non-payment of rent from "a perfect little hidey hole" in the basement apartment of a house owned by Turner (Mick Jagger), he ingratiates himself with one of the inhabitants, and moves in.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:11 am

519
Gimme Shelter (Albert Maysles, 1970)




To cite Gimme Shelter as the greatest rock documentary ever filmed is to damn it with faint praise. This 1970 release benefits from a horrifying serendipity in the timing of the shoot, which brought filmmakers Albert and David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin aboard as the Rolling Stones' tumultuous 1969 American tour neared its end. By following the band to the Altamont Speedway near San Francisco for a fatally mismanaged free concert, the Maysles and Zwerin wound up shooting what's been accurately dubbed rock's equivalent to the Zapruder film. The cameras caught the ominous undercurrents of violence palpable even before the first chords were strummed, and were still rolling when a concertgoer was stabbed to death by the Hell's Angels that served as the festival's pool cue-wielding security force.
By the time Gimme Shelter reached theater screens, Altamont was a fixed symbol for the death of the 1960s' spirit of optimism. The Maysles and Zwerin used that knowledge to shape their film: their chronicle begins in the editing room as they cut footage of the Stones' Madison Square Garden performance of "Jumpin' Jack Flash," and from there moves toward Altamont with a kind of dreadful grace. The songs become prophecies and laments for broken faith ("Wild Horses"), misplaced devotion ("Love in Vain"), and social collapse ("Street Fighting Man" and, of course, "Sympathy for the Devil"). Along the way, we glimpse the folly of the machinations behind the festival, the insularity of life on the concert trail, and the superstars' own shell-shocked loss of innocence.
Gimme Shelter looks into an abyss, partly self-created, from which the Rolling Stones would retreat--but unlike its subject, the filmmakers don't blink.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:15 am

520
Zabriskie Point (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1970)




Zabriskie Point is a 1970 film by Michelangelo Antonioni that depicts the U.S. counterculture movement of that time. It sympathetically tells the story of a young couple — an idealistic young secretary, and a militant radical — to put forward an anti-establishment message.
The cult film stars Mark Frechette and Daria Halprin, neither of whom had any previous acting experience. The screenplay was written by Antonioni, fellow Italian filmmaker Franco Rossetti, American playwright Sam Shepard, prolific screenwriter Tonino Guerra and Clare Peploe, wife of Bernardo Bertolucci. The film was the second of three English-language films that Antonioni had been contracted to direct for producer Carlo Ponti and to be distributed by MGM. The other two films were Blowup (1966) and The Passenger (1975).
The film's title refers to Zabriskie Point in Death Valley, the location of the film's famous desert love scene, in which members of the Open Theatre simulate an orgy.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:24 am

521
L'uccello dalle piume di cristallo (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage)
(Dario Argento, 1970)




Dario Argento takes sole writing credit for his directorial debut but The Bird with the Crystal Plumage is actually an unofficial adaptation of Fredric Brown's novel The Screaming Mimi. Sam Dalmas (Tony Musante), an American novelist in Italy, is a helpless spectator to a vicious attack in an art gallery. Initially a suspect, Sam becomes the key witness to the attempted murder, the fourth in a month but the first survived by the victim. Something about the attack haunts him and so he launches his own investigation as the murders continue, the killer finally turning on Sam. Argento exhibits a sure hand in his first film, creating an easy to follow thriller spiced with tightly choreographed murder scenes and leavened with character humor (his colorful cast includes a genial stuttering pimp and an eccentric artist who lives in a house with no doors). But it's his gift for arresting images and cinematic inventiveness that gives this thriller its edge, from the opening murder where Sam impotently watches the bleeding victim while trapped in a veritable glass cage to the killer's naked eye peering through a peephole at Sam's girlfriend (Suzy Kendall) as she hysterically searches for an escape from the killer's pounding attempts to break into her apartment. Future Oscar winner Vittorio Storaro shot the film and Ennio Morricone provides an unusual, often eerie score arranged for human voices. While less baroque than Argento's later work, it's a fine first film and a standout in the giallo genre.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:34 am

522
Il giardino dei Finzi-Contini (The garden of the Finzi-Continis)
(Vittorio de Sica, 1970)




Set in northern Italy's Ferrara community at the outbreak of World War II, this classic film by Vittorio De Sica concerns an old, aristocratic Jewish family, the Finzi-Continis, who maintain their isolated, idyllic ways within the stone walls of their lush estate while Mussolini imprisons Jews outside. The story's central figure, young Giorgio (Lino Capolicchio), is a middle-class Jew who has always found perfect sanctuary within the Finzi-Continis' walls and who is in love with his childhood friend from that family, Micol (Dominique Sanda). Micol, however, is sexually restless and fit to burst for want of experiences impossible under government oppression. As Giorgio suffers his estrangement from her, De Sica traces the disintegration of a lost and beautiful way of life, slowly turning his focus from the privileged refuge of tennis courts and private libraries to police barriers and rooms where Jews await transport to concentration camps. This powerful work of memory tragically captures a loss of innocence on both the most personal and historical stages.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:35 am

523
Wanda (Barbara Loden, 1970)




Wanda is an independent 1970 drama film that was written and directed by Barbara Loden, who also stars in the title role.
Wanda, after a string of abusive relationships, abandons her family and seeks solace in the company of a petty criminal (Michael Higgins).
Stylistically the film is improvisational and meditative in nature, similar to the works of European directors like Robert Bresson. It is seldom seen, but strongly admired. Loden, the wife of director Elia Kazan, died from cancer before she had an opportunity to make another film. But the legacy of Wanda, one of the very few American feature films directed by women at that time, endures.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:54 am

524
W.R. - Misterije organizma (W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism)
(Dusan Makavejev, 1971)




W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism (W.R. - Misterije organizma) is a 1971 film by Dušan Makavejev that explores the relationship between communist politics and sexuality, as well as exploring the life and work of Wilhelm Reich.
The film intercuts documentary footage with, predominantly, a narrative about a Yugoslav woman who seduces a Russian ice skater. Despite different settings, characters and time periods, the different elements produce a single story of human sexuality and revolution through a montage effect.

The main elements juxtaposed throughout the film are:
Milena is a metaphor for the Yugoslavian working class's struggle for liberation against the totalising influence of Russian communist state. Milena is killed when her sexual encounter with Vladimir Illych (the representative of Russian communism) goes awry. (To make the parallel more obvious, the Russian artist is a full namesake of Lenin (Lenin's proper Russian name was Vladimir Illych). Also, during his speech on the abandoned ship's deck, he assumed a position typical of how Lenin was depicted in numerous statues of him.) He, unable to fully experience his orgasmic urge, beheads her with his ice skate which is the film's metaphor for revolutionary theory. Makavejev dooms self-determination of the Yugslavian people, and the struggle of people worldwide for true freedom, to the fate of being totalised by Russian state communism, and the quest for sexual freedom to be overshadowed by "red fascists".


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 12:56 am

525
A clockwork orange (Stanley Kubrick, 1971)




Stanley Kubrick's striking visual interpretation of Anthony Burgess's famous novel is a masterpiece. Malcolm McDowell delivers a clever, tongue-in-cheek performance as Alex, the leader of a quartet of droogs, a vicious group of young hoodlums who spend their nights stealing cars, fighting rival gangs, breaking into people's homes, and raping women. While other directors would simply exploit the violent elements of such a film without subtext, Kubrick maintains Burgess's dark, satirical social commentary. We watch Alex transform from a free-roaming miscreant into a convict used in a government experiment that attempts to reform criminals through an unorthodox new medical treatment. The catch, of course, is that this therapy may be nothing better than a quick cure-all for a society plagued by rampant crime. A Clockwork Orange works on many levels--visual, social, political, and sexual--and is one of the few films that hold up under repeated viewings. Kubrick not only presents colorfully arresting images, he also stylizes the film by utilizing classical music (and Wendy Carlos's electronic classical work) to underscore the violent scenes, which even today are disturbing in their display of sheer nihilism. Ironically, many fans of the film have missed that point, sadly being entertained by its brutality rather than being repulsed by it.


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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:02 am

526
Le Chagrin et la pitié (The sorrow and the pity) (Marcel Ophuls, 1970)




Often hailed as one of the greatest documentaries of all time, The Sorrow and the Pity is still astonishing long after its original release in Paris. The lengthy film (anyone who has heard it prominently referred to in Woody Allen's Annie Hall knows it's four hours long) tells the story of France under Nazi occupation by weaving together a number of interviews as well as newsreel clips and propaganda films shot by the Nazis. Director Marcel Ophüls skillfully utilizes interviews with people who often contradict each other, so the story of France not only occupied but divided against itself emerges fully. Filmed in the late 1960s, when bitter memories still resonated, the interviews conducted by Ophüls have great depth and are often amazing. Ordinary Frenchmen who found themselves performing heroic acts for the Resistance recall the dangers they faced while those who collaborated with the Nazis make excuses. A former Nazi officer interviewed at a wedding party in Germany pompously puts a benign face on what occurred where he was stationed; interviews with French residents utterly refute his sanitized version of the past. Beyond the interviews, the arresting archival footage chosen by Ophüls is remarkable, such as an unsettling clip of a stand-up comedian performing before a laughing audience whose collar insignias identify them as members of the fanatical Nazi SS. The Sorrow and the Pity lives up to its reputation as being a magnificent documentary.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:05 am

527
Willy Wonka and the chocolate factory (Mel Stuart, 1971)




Having proven itself as a favorite film of children around the world, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory is every bit as entertaining now as it was when originally released in 1971. There's a timeless appeal to Roald Dahl's classic children's novel, which was playfully preserved in this charming musical, from the colorful carnival-like splendor of its production design to the infectious melody of the "Oompah-Loompah" songs that punctuate the story. Who can forget those diminutive Oompah-Loompah workers who recite rhyming parental warnings ("Oompah-Loompah, doopity do...") whenever some mischievous child has disobeyed Willy Wonka's orders to remain orderly? Oh, but we're getting ahead of ourselves ... it's really the story of the impoverished Charlie Bucket, who, along with four other kids and their parental guests, wins a coveted golden ticket to enter the fantastic realm of Wonka's mysterious confectionery. After the other kids have proven themselves to be irresponsible brats, it's Charlie who impresses Wonka and wins a reward beyond his wildest dreams. But before that, the tour of Wonka's factory provides a dazzling parade of delights, and with Gene Wilder giving a brilliant performance as the eccentric candyman, Wonka gains an edge of menace and madness that nicely counterbalances the movie's sentimental sweetness. It's that willingness to risk a darker tone--to show that even a wonderland like Wonka's can be a weird and dangerous place if you're a bad kid--that makes this an enduring family classic.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:08 am

528
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Robert Altman, 1971)




Iconoclastic director Robert Altman (Nashville, M.A.S.H.), deconstructs and demythologizes Hollywood's typically romantic vision of the Old West in this haunting, breathtaking masterpiece. A stranger, McCabe (Warren Beatty's best performance), the film's nonheroic protagonist, rides into a dead northwest mountain town (to the mournful sounds of Leonard Cohen), possessing ambitious entrepreneurial dreams of expansion. As the town grows, Mrs. Miller (Julie Christie's finest role, as well), a tough madam, arrives and convinces McCabe to join her in a partnership. Neither are typical Western archetypes: McCabe's an insecure braggart, bumbling lover, and horrible businessman, while Mrs. Miller, hardly a whore with a heart of gold, favors her opium pipe to her partner's romantic advances. Altman, meanwhile, buries these central characters within the town's complex, richly detailed tapestry of characters, preferring to eavesdrop on their overlapping conversations and study the bleak, harsh conditions of their lifestyles. At its core, the film addresses the sacrifices of individualism needed in order to build a community, an American concept that the independent Altman views with skeptical irony. The inevitable final shoot-out underscores the theme. Because McCabe refuses to sell the town he built to a corporation, hired bounty hunters are sent. Instead of a showdown at high noon, the finale--one of Altman's most beautiful set pieces--takes place in the snow, guerilla warfare style. As McCabe runs and hides for his life, the town he created preoccupies itself with saving a burning church instead of their creator, while Mrs. Miller, stoned and grinning, detaches herself from either concern. Cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond captures the town's brutal textures in luminous Cinemascope.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:15 am

529
Walkabout (Nicolas Roeg, 1971)




Very few films achieve a kind of subliminal greatness with cross-cultural impact, but Walkabout is one of those films--a visual tone poem that functions more as an allegory than a conventionally plotted adventure. Considered a cult favorite for years, Nicolas Roeg's 1971 film--about two British children who are rescued in the Australian outback by a young aborigine--was originally released in the U.S. with an R rating, edited from its European length of 100 minutes. In 1997, the film was fully restored to its director's cut, and in its remastered video and DVD release, it's now wisely unrated (as Roeg had always intended) but still suitable for viewers of all ages. For parents this is a rare opportunity to treat well-supervised children (ages 5 and over) to an adventure that won't insult their intelligence, presenting scenes of frontal nudity and the hunting of animals in a context that invites valuable discussion and introspection. Through exquisite cinematography and a story of subtle human complexity, the film continues to resonate on many thematic and artistic levels. Roeg had always intended it to be a cautionary morality tale, in which the limitations and restrictions of civilization become painfully clear when the two children (played by Jenny Agutter and Roeg's young son, Lucien John) cannot survive without the aborigine's assistance. They become primitives themselves, if only temporarily, while the young aborigine proves ultimately and tragically unable to join the "family" of civilization. With its story of two worlds colliding, Walkabout now seems like a film for the ages, hypnotic and open to several compelling levels of interpretation.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:17 am

530
Klute (Alan J. Pakula, 1971)




Jane Fonda came into her own with this Oscar-winning performance as an insecure high-class call girl who can't make it as a legitimate actress or model yet can't give up her addiction. She loves the control too much. But when she's stalked by a killer, she's forced to confront the darker aspects of her nature and profession. It's a complex and authentic performance and Fonda plays it cool and smart. Typical of early '70s films, Klute peels away social inhibition and hypocrisy with precision and candor. It's also typical of director Alan J. Pakula's intelligence and ability to work so well with actors. Donald Sutherland plays John Klute, the vulnerable detective trying to determine if his missing friend is the stalker and sexual deviant. This is the kind of moody, character-driven film so many of us miss today, even if the plot is pure hokum.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:19 am

531
Harold and Maude (Hal Ashby, 1971)




Black comedies don't come much blacker than this cult favorite from 1972, and they don't come much funnier, either. It seemed that director Hal Ashby was the perfect choice to mine a mother lode of eccentricity from the original script by Colin Higgins, about the unlikely romance between a death-obsessed 19-year-old named Harold (Bud Cort) and a life-loving 79-year-old widow named Maude (Ruth Gordon). They meet at a funeral, and Maude finds something oddly appealing about Harold, urging him to "reach out" and grab life by the lapels as opposed to dwelling morbidly on mortality. Harold grows fond of the old gal--she's a lot more fun than the girls his mother desperately matches him up with--and together they make Harold & Maude one of the sweetest and most unconventional love stories ever made. Much of the earlier humor arises from Harold's outrageous suicide fantasies, played out as a kind of twisted parlor game to mortify his mother, who's grown immune to her strange son's antics. Gradually, however, the film's clever humor shifts to a brighter outlook and finally arrives at a point where Harold is truly happy to be alive. Featuring soundtrack songs by Cat Stevens, this comedy certainly won't appeal to all tastes (it was a box-office flop when first released), but if you're on its quirky wavelength, it might just strike you as one of the funniest movies you've ever seen.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 05, 2009 1:45 pm

532
Még kér a nép (Red psalm) (Miklos Jancso, 1971)




People, circling in dance, are themselves encircled by mounted soldiers. An 1890s peasant uprising is about to be put down.
The entirety of Miklós Jancsó’s Még kér a nép unfolds in a field—and unfolds is the right word, because it is a scene of constant and immediate motion—dancing, walking, shooting, falling down dead, horses trotting—and motion in all directions, and lines of motion interweaving, or one encircling another: continual movements; continuous motion. Cinema’s greatest post-silent formalist is at the top of his art, choreographing humanity more deftly, more intricately than ever—and, for the first time, in color. Irony compounds irony; for the heartless nineteenth-century autocrats whose soldiers kill find Jancsó taking aim, in his own time, at ruling communists. The People Still Ask translates the Hungarian title; dressed in different ideologies, hiding behind different political masks, the powerful still oppress the masses, who must still ask, therefore, for change. Early on, a soldier shoots a girl’s hand; the bleeding is magically replaced with a red ribbon. One of the film’s final images: a panned mass of workers, a palm of each of them marked by a red ribbon.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part X: 1970-1974

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