Buscar
 
 

Resultados por:
 


Rechercher Búsqueda avanzada

Últimos temas
» The Michael Zager Band - Let's All Chant
Dom Oct 27, 2013 1:16 am por CristianFC

» Voz pasiva: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 11:01 am por The Boss

» Oraciones condicionales Tipo I + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:57 am por The Boss

» Comparativos y superlativos: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:52 am por The Boss

» Present Perfect: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:50 am por The Boss

» There is / There are - Some / Any - A / An- Much / Many: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:48 am por The Boss

» El futuro + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:45 am por The Boss

» Futuro con "going to": Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:32 am por The Boss

» Pasado simple y verbos irregulares: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:07 am por The Boss

Navegación
 Portal
 Índice
 Miembros
 Perfil
 FAQ
 Buscar
Foro

Estadisticas web
Diciembre 2016
LunMarMiérJueVieSábDom
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Calendario Calendario

Foro

Estadisticas web

1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Página 1 de 3. 1, 2, 3  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 12:54 pm

62. Arcangelo Corelli -
Twelve Concerti Grossi, op.6 (c.1700s)



Recording

Title: Concerti Grossi, op.6
Performers: The Bradenburg Consort
Director: Roy Goodman
Year: 1992
Length: 2 hours 20 minutes

Review

Ahh, the High Baroque starts here, and it really does. Corelli sounds more like the baroque of Vivaldi and Bach than any previous composer. Firstly the style of music, the concerto, really starts coming into its own at this stage and there are few collections of Baroque Concertos more impressive than Corelli's Concerti Grossi.

These are some beautiful pieces of music, almost cinematic in their emotion and feel, they are immediately striking to anyone who listens to them. Each of the twelve Concerti has their own identity which is quite clear, and the first 8 are quite different from the last 4 which include dances.

There is a kind of mixing of fast and slow movement here, but unlike later concertos with the Fast-slow-fast these concerti have more than three movements, having around 6 in most cases, but the high baroque sound is here, and it will be here to stay. Truly impressive music, beautiful and epic, superb.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

n 1685 Corelli was in Rome, where he led the festival performances of music for Queen Christina of Sweden and he was also a favorite of Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni, grand-nephew of another Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni who in 1689 became Pope Alexander VIII). From 1689 to 1690 he was in Modena; the Duke of Modena was generous to him. In 1708 he returned to Rome, living in the palace of Cardinal Ottoboni. His visit to Naples, at the invitation of the king, took place in the same year.

The style of execution introduced by Corelli and preserved by his pupils, such as Francesco Geminiani, Pietro Locatelli, and many others, was of vital importance for the development of violin playing. It has been said that the paths of all of the famous violinist-composers of 18th-century Italy lead to Arcangelo Corelli who was their "iconic point of reference." (Toussaint Loviko, in the program notes to Italian Violin Concertos, Veritas, 2003)

Concerto Grosso n.8 parts 1 and 2:



Última edición por JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 3:22 pm, editado 2 veces

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 12:55 pm

63. Antonio Vivaldi -
Gloria, RV 589 (1700s)




Recording

Title: Gloria - Magnificat
Performers: Taverner Consort and Players
Director: Andrew Parrott
Year: 1992
Length: 30 minutes

Review

So we get to Vivaldi, one of the defining voices of the baroque, and one of the most popular as well. From this Gloria we can easily see why he is so popular, his music has a joy that can only come from spending a life surrounded by young women who he taught how to play music at an orphanage in Venice.

In fact this Gloria was composed for those girls to sing, and even if it is a very respectful piece as any setting of the Gloria it is also quite playful, and that is something that always comes out in Vivaldi. Even the serious movements of this have some embellishment that is a little ray of sunshine.

Then it is supremely catchy, once heard it is hard to unhear Vivaldi, from the trademark rapid violins to the choral work here, it all conspires to make some quite catchy music, and also one of the most pleasant choral works to date.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Many of Vivaldi's compositions reflect a buoyant, almost playful, exuberance which are in direct contrast with the dignified seriousness of much Baroque music in his time. Most of Vivaldi's repertoire was rediscovered only in the first half of the 20th century in Turin and Genoa and was published in the second half. Vivaldi's music is innovative, breaking a consolidated tradition in schemes; he gave brightness to the formal and the rhythmic structure of the concerto, repeatedly looking for harmonic contrasts and invented innovative melodies and themes. Moreover, Vivaldi was able to compose non-academic music, particularly meant to be appreciated by the wide public and not only by an intellectual minority. The joyful appearance of his music reveals in this regard a transmissible joy of composing. These are among the causes of the vast popularity of his music. This popularity soon made him famous in other countries such as France which was, at the time, very independent concerning its musical taste.

Gloria:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 12:57 pm

64. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Preludes, Fantasias, Toccatas & Fugues (c.1705-48)




Recording

Title: Organ Works Vol.8
Performer: Gerhard Weinberger
Year: 2000
Length: 1 hour 8 minutes

Review

As I have made clear on this blog previously I have a particular distaste for Organ Music, and unfortunately although I recognise the merits of Bach's works it has not converted me to the instrument. I did not need converting on Bach's capacities as a composer however and this recording has pleasantly confirmed my ideas.

As Organ music goes this is the best stuff you can get, Bach's Toccatas and Fugues are well known for good reason, they are incredibly expressive and impressive. The very famous BWV 565 is missing from this recording because its authorship is disputed, but the ones that are here make up for it in spades.

That said I really dislike the Organ and I hear the music and always think: This is great, I wish it was in some other instrument. Fortunately many of Bach's Organ works have been transcribed for other instruments, but they do in the end belong on the organ which I have difficulty stomaching.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Bach was best known during his lifetime as an organist, organ consultant, and composer of organ works in both the traditional German free genres such as preludes, fantasias, and toccatas, and stricter forms such as chorale preludes and fugues. He established a reputation at a young age for his great creativity and ability to integrate foreign styles into his organ works. A decidedly North German influence was exerted by Georg Böhm, with whom Bach came into contact in Lüneburg, and Dieterich Buxtehude in Lübeck, whom the young organist visited in 1704 on an extended leave of absence from his job in Arnstadt. Around this time, Bach copied the works of numerous French and Italian composers to gain insights into their compositional languages, and later arranged violin concertos by Vivaldi and others for organ and harpsichord. His most productive period (1708–14) saw the composition of several pairs of preludes and fugues and toccatas and fugues, and of the Orgelbüchlein ("Little organ book"), an unfinished collection of 45 short chorale preludes that demonstrate compositional techniques in the setting of chorale tunes. After he left Weimar, Bach's output for organ fell off, although his best-known works (the six trio sonatas, the Clavierübung III of 1739, and the "Great eighteen" chorales, revised late in his life) were all composed after this time. Bach was extensively engaged later in his life in consulting on organ projects, testing newly built organs, and dedicating organs in afternoon recitals. One of the high points may be the third part of the Clavierübung, a setting of 21 chorale preludes uniting the traditional Catholic Missa with the Lutheran catechism liturgy, the whole set interpolated between a mighty Prelude and Fugue on the theme of the Trinity.

BWV 540/1, Toccata in F major:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:00 pm

65. Jean-Phillipe Rameau -
Pieces De Clavecin (1706- 47)




Recording

Title: Pieces de Clavecin
Performer: Christophe Rousset
Year: 1989
Length: 2 hours 10 minutes

Review

Over two hours of Harpsichord can take their toll on you, but frankly this is a lovely recording. Rameau is just such an innovator and has such a sense of drama even in his Harpsichord pieces that it ends up being a quite impressive couple of hours. And the dullness of an harpsichord is nothing compared to the organ. Now I will soon have to review a 12 Cd collection of Couperin Harpsichord works and then we can talk again.

Rameau makes lovely use of what is really a pretty limited instrument, but he stretches it to its most exciting possibilities. From some lovely imitative pieces representing birds or a chicken to some fascinating experiments on harmony like Les Cyclopes (my favourite harpsichord piece at the moment) Rameau just never puts a foot wrong.

Of course some pieces will not be as impressive as the others, but in the end this is a beautiful recording and I could not recommend it more to anyone who is a fan of the harpsichord.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Along with François Couperin, Rameau is one of the two masters of the French school of harpsichord music in the 18th century. Both composers made a decisive break with the style of the first generation of harpsichordists, who confined their compositions to the relatively fixed mould of the classical suite. This reached its apogee in the first decade of the 18th century with successive collections of pieces by Louis Marchand, Gaspard Le Roux, Louis-Nicolas Clérambault, Jean-François Dandrieu, Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre, Charles Dieupart and Nicolas Siret.

But Rameau and Couperin have a very different style anyway and Rameau cannot be considered the follower of the older composer. They seem not to have known one another (Couperin was one of the official court musicians while Rameau was still an unknown; fame would only come to him after Couperin’s death). Besides, Rameau published his first book of harpsichord pieces in 1706 while Couperin - who was fifteen years his senior - waited until 1713 before publishing his first “ordres”. Rameau’s pieces seem less intended to exploit the particular qualities of the harpsichord than Couperin’s; they place less importance on ornamentation and are more satisfying when played on the piano. When the respective size of their contributions to the harpsichord repertoire is taken into consideration, Rameau’s music perhaps shows more variety. It includes pieces in the pure tradition of the French suite, imitative (“Le rappel des oiseaux“, “La poule“) and character (“Les tendres plaintes“, “L'entretien des Muses“) pieces, and works of pure virtuosity which resemble Scarlatti ((“Les tourbillons,” “Les trois mains“), as well as pieces which reveal the experiments of a theorist and musical innovator (“L'Enharmonique“, “Les Cyclopes“) which had a marked influence on Daquin, Royer and Jacques Duphly. The suites are grouped in the traditional way, by key.

Les Cyclopes:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:02 pm

66. Georg Philipp Telemann -
Trumpet Concerto in D Major (c. 1708 - 14)




Recording

Title: The Art Of The Baroque Trumpet Vol.1
Performer: Niklas Eklund
Director: Nils-Erik Sparf
Year: 1995
Length: 7 minutes

Review

This is a lovely little concerto here. I really like the trumpet when used in the context of a concerto, it just rises above the orchestra in a beautiful way. Telemann is probably not one of the most famous of Baroque composers, it is hard off the top of my head to remember a lot of works by him, except for the fact that he was incredibly prolific.

That said the fact that he was so prolific leads to a monkeys and typewriters scenario, there are bound to be some really good things in the middle of his 3000 compositions, and this is certainly one of them.

The format of the concerto is the typical slow-fast-slow-fast and the alternation really works in a way that shows off the capacities of the trumpet. This is a lovely little work.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Guinness Book of World Records lists Telemann as the most prolific composer of all time with more than 800 credited works. More recent studies, for example the thematic catalogues of his works published in the 1980s and 1990s, have shown that Telemann actually wrote over 3,000 compositions, many of which are now lost. Some of his pieces, thought lost, were recently uncovered by the musicologist Jason Grant. Many of the manuscripts were destroyed during World War II. (Another composer, Simon Sechter, could be considered more prolific, since he is thought to have written over 8000 pieces, but 5000 of these were short fugues.)

The whole thing:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:05 pm

67. Antonio Vivaldi -
Concerto for Two Trumpets (1711)




Recording

Title: Mad About Vivaldi
Performers: Mark Bennett, Michael Harrison, The English Concert
Director: Trevor Pinnock
Year: 1991
Length: 7 minutes

Review

Yet another small trumpet concerto, this time by two trumpets and this time by Vivaldi. The main difference from yesterday's Telemann concerto is in the use that Vivaldi makes of the orchestra.

Vivaldi uses the orchestra as completely complementary to the solo trumpets , almost at the same level of importance in terms of sound. And actually makes for a more interesting piece, it isn't as heavenly as Telemann, the trumpets have a lot more fun here, as they would in Vivaldi's hands.

Interestingly Vivaldi never again made concerts for Trumpet, probably because of their limited range, and that is possibly why the Orchestra is as important here, as a way for Vivaldi to minimise the shortcomings of the trumpet. A fantastic piece of work.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Vivaldi had a medical problem which he called the tightening of the chest (probably some form of asthma). His medical problem, however, did not prevent him from learning to play the violin, composing or taking part in many musical activities. At the age of 15 (1693), he began studying to become a priest. In 1703, at the age of 25, Vivaldi was ordained a priest, and soon nicknamed Il Prete Rosso, "The Red Priest", probably because of his red hair.

Not long after his ordination, in 1704, he was given a dispensation from celebrating the Holy Mass because of his ill health. From that point onward he appears to have withdrawn from active practice, but did remain a priest.

The concert:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Sep 28, 2009 1:07 pm

68. Antonio Vivaldi -
L'Estro Armonico (1711)




Recording

Title: L'Estro Armonico
Performer: Frederico Guglielmo, L'Arte dell'Arco
Director: Christopher Hogwood
Year: 2002
Length: 1 hour 50 minutes

Review

After a couple of very short concertos we get a set of 12 Vivaldi concertos for strings, and they are great. Vivaldi shows a lot of his range here, the concertos aren't simply lively Vivaldiesque things, they are also surprisingly sad in their slow movements or even menacing.

There are moments in these concertos where the orchestra attacks a chord in an almost aggressive way which works great. Other than that there are also moments of menace, for example at the beginning of the second concerto in a way very reminiscent of Vivaldi's Winter in the Four Seasons.

You can see a definite evolution since Corelli's set of concertos at the beginning of the century, the solo instruments although not exactly 'fighting' the orchestra or dialoguing with it have a place here which they didn't in Corelli. Great stuff.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

L'estro Armonico op. 3 ("Harmonic Inspiration" in Italian) is a collection of twelve concertos for 1, 2 and 4 violins written by Antonio Vivaldi in 1711. It largely augmented the reputation of Vivaldi as Il Prete Rosso; (The Red Priest). The collections were mostly put together in a chronological order.

J.S. Bach later transcribed concertos from this work for harpsichord solo (no.9, no.12), for organ solo (no.8, no.11) and for four harpsichords and strings (no.10).

Concerto n.1:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 8:30 pm

69. Antonio Vivaldi -
Stabat Mater (1712)



Recording

Title: Vivaldi Sacred Music (volume 5)
Performer: Robin Blaze, The King's Consort
Director: Robert King
Year: 1998
Length: 19 minutes

Review

Ok so we will stop with the Vivaldi after this, for a while at least. In the meantime we have another great vocal work by him. Unlike the Gloria, which was mainly a choral work, the Stabat Mater is for a soloist. And a male soloist at that, even if it is for a falsetto or castrato, and there for not a very manly man.

Vivaldi knows how to make music mimic emotions, and for this most painful of texts about Mary's suffering, he knows to leave out his regular giddiness and stick to the slow and sad areas of music.

Vivaldi does this extremely well, by using the instruments to mimic emotions, whether using staccato to mimic gasps of suffering or allying the voice to the violin in the more peaceful moments. A short vocal work, but great.

Final Grade

9/10 (there's been a spate of them!)

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The fate of the Italian composer's legacy is unique. After the Napoleonic wars, it was thought that a large part of Vivaldi's work had been irrevocably lost. However, in the autumn of 1926, after a detective-like search by researchers, 14 folios of Vivaldi's previously unknown religious and secular works were found in the library of a monastery in Piedmont. Some even and odd-numbered volumes were missing and so, the search continued. Finally, in October 1930, the missing volumes were found to be with the descendants of the Grand Duke Durazzo, who had acquired the property as early as the eighteenth century.

To its amazement, the world of music was presented with 300 concerts for various instruments, 18 operas, not counting a number of arias and more than 100 vocal-instrumental pieces. Such an impressive list of newly unearthed opuses warranted a re-evaluation of Vivaldi's creativity.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 8:43 pm

70. François Couperin -
Twenty-Seven Ordres (1713-30)



Recording

Title: L'Integrale de clavecin au château d'Assas
Performer: Scott Ross
Year: 1980s
Length: 12 CDs!

Review

Sorry for the delay in posting this new instalment of the blog, but the list has just demanded that I listen to 12 CDs of (mostly) unaccompanied harpsichord music, and as you can imagine that takes a while.

I must confess I didn't listen to this recording the usual three times that I usually do to familiarise myself with a work. But I did listen all the way through the 12 CDs, and am at the moment slightly sick of harpsichord music.

This is not to say, however that the music wasn't good, because it was, and I have always liked Couperin, although I would probably choose some of his other works like the Concerts Royaux to represent him, instead of this Marathon.

It is interesting music, but actually more in concept than execution. Most of the pieces in this have titles which are very evocative, such as a sequence that examines different emotions while using what is essentially the same tune, or having little portraits of people in harpsichord form. All this gives a very poetic quality to the music, which seeks to represent more than just sounds, but defined emotions and images. And it is often successful at that. Unfortunately, however it is never as innovative or exciting as Rameau for example, and you would be better served with Rameau, particularly because his harpsichord work takes up 2 CDs.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Couperin's four volumes of harpsichord music, published in Paris in 1713, 1717, 1722, and 1730, contain over 230 individual pieces, which can be played on solo harpsichord or performed as small chamber works. These pieces were not grouped into suites, as was the common practice, but ordres, which were Couperin's own version of suites containing traditional dances as well as descriptive pieces. The first and last pieces in an ordre were of the same tonality, but the middle pieces could be of other closely-related tonalities. These volumes were loved by J.S. Bach and, much later, Richard Strauss, as well as Maurice Ravel who memorialized their composer with Le Tombeau de Couperin (A Memorial to Couperin).

Les Barricades Misterieuses:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 8:45 pm

71. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Orgelbuchlein (1715-40)



Recording


Title: Organ Works Vol.3 and Vol.4
Performer: Gerhard Weinberger
Year: 1999
Length: 1 hour 20 minutes

Review


Finally! The last unaccompanied organ recording in the foreseeable future! And I think ever... hopefully. As you can see my dislike of the unaccompanied organ lives on with a vengeance.

What can I say about these pieces, firstly they are dull. Then they are dull, and then you can see some of the interesting aspects of them, firstly they consist of pretty short pieces, about 40 of them, and they are generally quite melodic pieces.

Bach was a great organ composer, but I just hate the damned contraption. I would rather listen to the 27 Couperin Ordres on the harpsichord again, frankly.

Final Grade


7/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

The chorale preludes of the Orgelbüchlein share several common stylistic features, which are the distinguishing traits of what is known as the "Orgelbüchlein-style chorale:"

* The chorale melody, embellished to varying degrees or unembellished altogether, is in one voice (excepting BWV 615, In dir ist Freude, in which the melody is broken up into motives and bounces between several voices).

* The melody is in the soprano voice (except for BWV 611, Christum, wir sollen loben schon, in which it is in the alto voice, and the canonical preludes BWV 600, 608, 618, 619, 620, 624, 629 and 633/634).

* The pieces are written in four-voice counterpoint, except for BWV 599, Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, which is written in five voices, and BWV 639, Ich ruf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, which is written in three.

* The pieces span exactly the length of the chorale melody; there are no introductions or codas.

O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß BWV 622:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 8:48 pm

72. Antonio Vivaldi -
Juditha Triumphans (1716)




Recording


Title: Juditha Triumphans
Performers: Ann Murray, Maria Cristina Kiehr, Choir of the King's Consort, King's Consort
Director: Robert King
Year: 1992
Length: 2 hours 20 minutes

Review

This is Vivaldi's only surviving Oratorio, and what a remarkable piece it is. As usual Vivaldi dazzles as much by the instrumentation as by the use of voices, particularly striking here are the uses of sometimes quite sparse but very effective instrumentations for arias.

This is a work that is at the same time fierce, contemplative, meditative, furious and triumphant. Vivaldi shows himself to be a master at invoking all these feelings throughout the oratorio.

Of course the recitatives hinder the pace somewhat, but they are always short enough not to make you skip the track, and after all they are integral to the work. It is a pity that no other oratorio by Vivaldi survived as this is an amazing and very forward looking work, parts here foreshadow the classical period, not all sounds baroque here, the accompaniment of arias with a simple woodwind instrument(a precursor of the clarinet whose name escapes me) tune or violla d'amore with a fully developed part for the instruments as important as the singer's is also reflective of something different in Vivaldi's music. Highly Recommended.

Final Grade


9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Juditha triumphans was composed and performed in November of 1716 in Venice by the orchestra and choir of the Ospedale della Pietà and is described as his first great oratorio. The work was commissioned to celebrate the victory of the Republic of Venice over the Turks during the siege of Corfu. In July 1716, the Turks had landed on Corfu and set siege to the island. The population resisted the occupation and in August, Venice signed an alliance with the Emperor. On 18 August, under the leadership of count Johann Matthias von der Schulenburg, the decisive battle was won and the Turks abandoned the island.

Juditha Triumphans was represented at the Pietà in November and was a great success. The story of Judith and her victory on the invading Holofernes was an allegory of Venice defeating the invading Turks in Corfu. The victorious General von der Schulenburg was among the audience.

Armatea face et anguibus:



JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 8:57 pm

73. George Friedric Handel -
Water Music (1717)



Recording

Title: Water Music Suites; Music for the Royal Fireworks
Performers: English Baroque Soloists
Director: John Eliot Gardiner
Year: 1991
Length: 53 minutes

Review


This is probably one of the most famous collections of music to have show up on the list until now, that does not, however, make it one of the better. Populism does not always mean rightism. That is not to say as well that it is bad, in fact it is quite good, but it is impaired by the conditions for which it was composed.

Most of the music, possibly not all of it, was composed to be played in the open air during a trip in the Thames in a boat accompanying George I's boat. This means that the harpsichord had to be left out because of space requirements and the music had to be quite loud and brassy.

Handel clearly took a lot of inspiration from Lully who was the master of loud and brassy music. He never achieves the same levels of sheer joy of Lully however, and you can feel that he was restrained. Still the music he does write is quite inventive and supremely catchy, but you can tell that this was probably not the ideal conditions for great original composing to arise. It is flashy, but when you scrape under the surface, not that impressive.

Final Grade


8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

It premiered in the summer of 1717 (July 17, 1717) when King George I requested a concert on the River Thames. The concert was performed by 50 musicians that joined King George I on his barge. King George I was said to have loved it so much that he ordered the exhausted musicians to play the suites three times on the trip.

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 9:08 pm

74. Marin Marais -
Pièces de Viole, quatrième livre ( 1717)



Recording

Title: Suitte d'un Gout Etranger
Performers: Christophe Coin, Christophe Rousset
Year: 1996
Length: 75 minutes

Review

I got introduced to the wonderful world of the viol by the great Jordi Savall and his recordings of Marin Marais, Couperin, Monsieur De Sainte-Colombe etc. Actually the first date I had with my wife when we started going out was a concert by Jordi Savall in Lisbon. So as you can imagine this has been going on for a while.

This recording is not by Savall, even if he is probably the most prolific recorder of French viol music. Still, it is equally good stuff, and Marais is an amazing composer.

The sound of the viol is possibly one of the most beautiful sounds that you can take form a stringed instrument, and in the hands of a skilled performer it sounds like nothing else. Highly Recommended.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Titon du Tillet included Marais in Le Parnasse françois, making the following comments on two of his pieces:

A piece from his fourth book entitled The Labyrinth, which passes through various keys, strikes various dissonances and notes the uncertainty of a man caught in a labyrinth through serious and then quick passages; he comes out of it happily and finishes with a gracious and natural chaconne. But he surprised musical connoisseurs even more successfully with his pieces called La Gamme [The Scale], which is a piece de symphonie that imperceptibly ascends the steps of the octave; one then descends, thereby going through harmonious songs and melodious tones, the various sounds of music.

L'Arabesque in an excerpt from the great film on the life of Marin Marais, Tous Le Matins Du Monde :


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 03, 2010 9:11 pm

75. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Violin Concertos (1717-1723)



Recording

Title: Violin Concertos
Performers: Simon Standage (Violin), Collegium Musicum 90
Year: 1996
Length: 30 minutes

Review

I should note that by violin concertos it is only meant BWV 1041 and 1042, so concertos for solo violin, the also famous concerto for two violins will be coming up next on the list.

Bach, particularly when he is not attached to the Organ is capable of the most attractive music you can think of. And although he wasn't as prolific a composer for strings as for other instruments, it is definitely where I feel that Bach shines brightest.

These concerts are evidence of that, Bach creates two little masterpieces, which are very influenced by Vivaldi but with their own identity and an emotional maturity that is not as apparent in the happy go lucky Vivaldi.

This performance is not as vivacious as the ones I am more used to, for the violin concertos, but it is definitely more intimate, so you have to choose pomp or intimacy. If you go for intimacy go for this recording, definitely.

The concerts here have the format that they will have for a long time in the future, fast-slow-fast, and even though the violin still does not have a proper dialogue with the orchestra which is there to support it, the sound of the concertos is more modern than even Vivaldi who was the great inspiration for Bach. Great.


Final Grade


9/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

J.S. Bach’s works are indexed with BWV numbers, an initialism for Bach Werke Verzeichnis (Bach Works Catalogue). The catalogue, published in 1950, was compiled by Wolfgang Schmieder. The catalogue is organised thematically, rather than chronologically: BWV 1–224 are cantatas, BWV 225–249 the large-scale choral works, BWV 250–524 chorales and sacred songs, BWV 525–748 organ works, BWV 772–994 other keyboard works, BWV 995–1000 lute music, BWV 1001–40 chamber music, BWV 1041–71 orchestral music, and BWV 1072–1126 canons and fugues. In compiling the catalogue, Schmieder largely followed the Bach Gesellschaft Ausgabe, a comprehensive edition of the composer's works that was produced between 1850 and 1905.


David Oistrakh performs Bach violin concerto in A minor (1st movement):


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 04, 2010 1:41 pm

76. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Concerto for Two Violins (1717-23)



Recording

Title: Bach - Concertos
Performers: Hilary Hahn, Margaret Batjer
Director: Jeffrey Kahane
Year: 2002
Length: 15 minutes

Review

This is probably the best violin concerto by Bach, it shows a maturity even greater than those for solo violin. The interplay between the two soloist parts is quite something here.

The first two movements of this fast-slow-fast concerto are particularly striking and also quite famous, the third movement is more chaotic, but this performance does the whole concerto justice by managing to keep the sounds extremely clear in the ear of the listener, without sacrificing sentiment.

This is a beautiful work by Bach, who again proves himself to be one of the best composers for stringed instruments in the Baroque period. Really outstanding music, and a recording which, although it takes the opposite position of the last recording on the list, not being as intimate, but being more vivacious, is quite spectacular.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The Concerto for Two Violins in D minor (BWV 1043) is perhaps one of the most famous works by J. S. Bach and considered among the best examples of the work of the late Baroque period. Bach wrote it in Leipzig sometime between 1730 and 1731, most likely for the Leipzig Collegium Musicum, of which he was the director. It also exists in an arrangement for two harpsichords, transposed into C minor (BWV 1062). In addition to the two soloists, the concerto is scored for strings and basso continuo.

A little video on this recording:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 04, 2010 1:49 pm

77. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Orchestral Suites (c.1717-1742)



Recording

Title: 4 Orchestral Suites
Performers: Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Director: Ton Koopman
Year: 1988
Length: 1 hour 17 minutes

Review

You will notice that the previous album cover is different from the one in the book, well the one in the book is an old cover of a 2 CD version of the same recording. Now they got a new cover and managed to stick it all on one CD. Good for them.

So, what can we say about Bach's Orchestral Suites? Firstly, they are not as impressive as his violin concertos, you feel a lack of a strong solo instrument over the orchestral. Secondly they are quite well known, with the Air from the third suite and the last movement of the second being particularly famous.

This fame doesn't do the work many favours, however, you really don't need to listen to the Air again, as it was the basis for Air on a G String, probably in the top 10 most over-used classical tracks of all time. The Badinerie of the second suite is probably also up there in overly and misused tracks, being a famous ring tone... yes.

That said these are both amazing pieces, as are the rest of the Orchestral suites, it is not their inherent fault that they have been raped. Still, in the context of Bach it is far from being his best work, in my opinion, so let's move on to more Bach and the next one is a doozy!

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The badinerie has become a show-piece for solo flautists, due to its quick pace and difficulty, and it is also often heard as a mobile phone ringtone. It was sampled by rapper Busdriver for his 2002 song Imaginary Places.

Thank you Busdriver.

The Overture of the first suite:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 04, 2010 1:52 pm

78. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Six Suites For Solo Cello (c.1720)



Recording

Title: Six Suites For Solo Cello
Performer: Torleif Thedéen
Year: 1995-96
Length: about 2 hours

Review

This is probably one of the most famous works for solo cello, if not the most famous, and there are very good reasons for that. This collection of six suites is a truly impressive achievement by Bach, each suite has a very different feel, from the light 1st to the very dark 5th, they each work very independently while being absolutely part of the same vision.

The solo cello suites by Bach are some of my favourite works for any instrument, I was, like many I am sure, woken up to it as a young boy due to Yo-Yo Ma's Inspired by Bach series. With the years I have come not to find Mr. Ma's performance as the best one, or most faithful. Inspired by Bach is right.

Torlief Thedéen gives us what is a substantially darker approach to the work, which works better and makes the whole thing juicier, more layered and with further depths. If you want to buy this through amazon.co.uk don't be discouraged by the sole 1 sentence 1 star review, that person is talking shit. Get it.

Final Grade


10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

An exact chronology of the suites (regarding both the order in which the suites were composed and whether they were composed before or after the solo violin sonatas) cannot be completely established. However, scholars generally believe that—based on a comparative analysis of the styles of the sets of works—the cello suites arose first, effectively dating the suites pre-1720, the year on the title page of Bach's autograph of the violin sonatas.

The suites were not widely known before the 1900s, and for a long time it was generally thought that the pieces were intended to be études. However, after discovering Grützmacher's edition in a thrift shop, Pablo Casals began studying and performing the works, although it was 35 years before he agreed to record the pieces, becoming the first to create a complete record of all 6 suites. Their popularity soared soon after, and Casals's original recording is still widely available today.

Attempts to compose piano accompaniments to the suites include a notable effort by Robert Schumann. In 1923, Leopold Godowsky realised suites 2, 3 and 5 in full counterpoint for solo piano.

Unlike Bach's violin sonatas, no autograph manuscript survives, thus ruling out the use of an urtext performing edition. However, analysis of secondary sources—including a hand-written copy by Bach's second wife, Anna Magdalena—have produced passably authentic editions, although critically deficient in the placement of slurs and other articulation. As a result, many interpretations of the suites exist, with no singularly accepted version.

Recent speculation by Professor Martin Jarvis of Charles Darwin University School of Music, in Darwin, Australia holds that Anna Magdalena may have been the composer of several musical pieces attributed to her husband. Jarvis proposes that Magdalena wrote the six Cello Suites, and was involved with the composition of the aria from the Goldberg Variations (BWV 988). Musicologists and performers, however, point to thin evidence of this proposition, remaining skeptical of the claim.

Allemande from the 1st suite, by Rostropovich


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:29 pm

79. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Sonatas & Partitas for Solo Violin (1720)




Recording


Title: Complete Sonatas & Partitas for Violin Solo
Performer: Rachel Podger
Year: 1998-99
Length: 2 hours

Review

The book tell you to get the two separate CDs, but that is now unnecessary because there is a boxed set with the two CDs, that you can see the picture of up there. And it costs the same as each of the other ones. So yay!

And this is something you will want to buy actually, much like the Cello Suites are essential solo cello works, this is essential solo violin stuff. I still prefer the cello suites, but that is because the sound of the Cello appeals more to me, but these are equally brilliant. Just listen to the Ciacconna of the second partita and you will know what I mean, some of the most impressive 13 minutes on a violin you will ever hear.

There is however, the slight feel that these pieces are more oriented to being show off pieces, rather than for the seer enjoyment of the sound. Still Bach manages to ally what really demands virtuosity in the playing with the fact that it ends up being pretty impressive sonically. Highly Recommended.

Final Grade


10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Bach composed the works in 1720, while employed at Köthen. The manuscript was nearly destroyed but someone saved it from being used as butcher paper. There, Bach composed more chamber music than sacred or choral music; the Brandenburg Concertos, concerto for two violins, and cello suites were all composed about this time.

The original performer of Bach's six sonatas and partitas is unknown. J.G. Pisendel and J.B. Volumier have been suggested, both being talented violinists at the Dresden court, as has Joseph Spiess, leader of the orchestra at Cöthen, where Bach composed the works. However, some contend that it may have been Bach himself who gave the first performance, pointing to his skills as a violinist. His father, Johann Ambrosius Bach, was a violinist, and according to his son Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, "in his youth, and until the approach of old age, he played the violin cleanly and powerfully".

Partita No 3 BWV 1006 (IV.Menuetto I et II) - Rachel Podger :


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:31 pm

80. George Frideric Handel -
Keyboard Suites (1720, 1733)



Recording

Title: Harpsichord Works (Volumes 1,2 and 3)
Performer: Sophie Yates
Year: 1998
Length: 3 hours 30 minutes

Review


This is a really good three CD collection of Handel's Harpsichord works. These aren't particularly famous pieces, but they are still some really good stuff, you can clearly see the influence from the great French composers for the instrument, particularly the livelier Rameau.

In fact the similarities to Rameau's harpsichord works are striking and that brings the value of these works down a notch, because even though they mimic some of Rameau's work they are not as good.

Still, this is a superbly played collection of what is a pretty exciting work for the harpsichord, Handel doesn't let the virtuosity down at any time through these recordings, and even if at times they might sound like "show off" pieces they are quite uniformly good.

Final Grade


8/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

Handel displayed considerable musical talent at an early age; by the age of seven he was a skillful performer on the harpsichord and pipe organ, and at nine he began to compose music. However, his father, an eminent barber-surgeon who served as valet and barber to the Courts of Saxony and Brandenburg, and a distinguished citizen of Halle, was opposed to his son's wish to pursue a musical career, preferring him to study law; by contrast, Handel's mother, Dorothea, encouraged his musical aspirations.

Harmonious Blacksmith from Suite No.5 In E Major:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:34 pm

81. Johann Sebastian Bach -
The Brandenburg Concertos (1721)



Recording


Title: The Brandenburg Concertos
Performer: Hanover Band
Director: Anthony Halstead
Year: 1991-92
Length: 2 hours

Review

The Brandenburg concertos are some of the most famous pieces of Baroque concertos, probably only second place to Vivaldi's Four Seasons in popularity. Unlike many cases of very popular pieces, there are very good reasons why these concertos deserve that popularity.

These are endlessly inventive pieces, which actually include what is the first ever Keyboard concerto in No.4 with its impressive harpsichord solo in the first movement. The collection also includes truly impressive parts for all kinds of solo instruments.

But even with all this virtuosity required from the players, Bach never sacrifices beauty on the alter of technical skill, these are supremely beautiful, lively and actually "catchy" songs, and that is the reason which explain their popular appeal, and it is fully deserved. Concerto No.2 was sent to space on Voyager and if there are little green men out there will be the first thing they hear, what a rosy picture of humanity they'll get.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Because King Frederick William I of Prussia was not a significant patron of the arts, Christian Ludwig seems to have lacked the musicians in his Berlin ensemble to perform the concertos. The full score was left unused in the Margrave's library until his death in 1734, when it was sold for 24 groschen (as of 2008, about US$22.00 of silver). The concertos were discovered in the archives of Brandenburg in the 19th century.

In the modern era these works have been performed by orchestras with the string parts each played by a number of players, under the batons of, for example, Karl Richter and Herbert von Karajan. They have also been performed as chamber music, with one instrument per part, especially by (but not limited to) groups using baroque instruments and historically-informed techniques and practice.

The short but cheerful Allegro Assai from the 2nd Concerto:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:36 pm

82. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Magnificat (1723)



Recording


Title: Leipziger Weihnachskantaten
Performers: Collegium Vocale Gent
Director: Philippe Herreweghe
Year: 2002
Length: 30 minutes

Review


This isn't the most common version of the Magnificat in D, but the one in E flat. and if the D version is considered the most spectacular, this version doesn't lag much behind, actually it wins something in terms of intimacy, with all the fire and fury when it is needed.

Actually this is at times a pretty violent piece. The text of the magnificat does indeed require some anger, and some revolutionary anger at that. When the Virgin Mary relates how God takes up the dispossessed and makes the rich dispossessed there is a very almost communistic anger to the whole thing. In such as way that in Guatemala during the 80's it was a forbidden text because of it's revolutionary contents.

Bach again shows what a genius he is here, there are few choruses inter-spread with soloist pieces, the soloist pieces are beautiful and the choruses are like an army of avenging angels, with the occasional tender moments. Bach captures more emotional nuances in the Magnificat than just about anyone did before him. A truly impressive choral piece that would wake up anyone at church. Essential.

Final Grade


10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Bach composed an initial version in E flat major in 1723 for the Christmas Vespers in Leipzig which contained several Christmas texts. During the years he removed the Christmas-specific texts to make it suitable for year-round performance, as well as transposing it to D major, providing better sonority for the trumpets in particular. The new version, which is the one usually performed, had its premiere at the Thomaskirche on July 2, 1733, the fourth Sunday after Trinity Sunday, which was the Feast of the Visitation at the time. The Feast was later moved to the end of May.

Fecit Potentiam... probably in D:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:40 pm

83. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Great Cantatas (1723-29)



Recording

Title: Weinen, Klagen...
Performer: Collegium Vocale Gent
Director: Philippe Herreweghe
Year: 2003
Length: 1 hour

Review

Again Bach shows his flair for deeply emotional music, in a way that would be further developed in his two great Passions. The stand-out here is clearly to Weinen, Klagen... a beautiful cantata with a very long and affecting chorus.

That said, this isn't as striking a collection of Bach's works as some of the recent ones we have had here, it is much more loosely connected than the Magnificat, because it is actually composed of three works and with the two Passions coming up we know that he did it in much more spectacular scale.

In a sense these are important works as little miniatures of the Passions, and are very beautiful in themselves. A recommended recording for Bach lovers.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The term "cantata" was not used widely by Bach; it seems to have chiefly been applied to his secular cantatas. Bach's manuscript scores typically have only the liturgical date as a heading; if the piece does have a designation, "concerto" seems to be the most common. The term "cantata" to refer to these pieces came into wider use after the publication of the Bach Gesselschaft edition of his works.

Warsaw Boys Choir - J S Bach - Cantata BWV 12 :


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:45 pm

84. Johann Sebastian Bach -
St. John Passion (1724)



Recording

Title: Christmas Oratorio- St. Matthew Passion - St. John Passion - Mass in B Minor
Performer: Anthony Rolfe Johnson, Andreas Schmidt, English Baroque Soloists, Monteverdi Choir
Director: John Eliot Gardiner
Year: 1986
Length: 2 hours

Review


You put this on, and for the opening 10 minutes alone you know you are going to have to give it a 9 or a 10 depending on what comes after. And so it is, this is probably the most spectacular opening of any work on the list until now. It is simply amazing instrumental work with a chorus that really gives you a sense that God is speaking to you right now, and he is slightly miffed.

Then you go on through the album, and each time a chorus appears that frisson of excitement comes back, not as strongly, but strongly enough. Unfortunately this will not be a 10, because recitatives do drag on and there is only so much I can hear of people talking in German without getting a bit bored.

Fortunately, just as you are about to get bored of the whole thing, a beautiful Aria comes on, or another bombastic choir and you rethink the whole thing. Bach makes some of the most original and beautiful uses of choirs here, to the point where he has an aria with a choir singing quietly at the back, much behind the soloist, and I had not heard anything similar on this list before. Amazing work, pity about the recitatives... but he needed to have them.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The text for the body of the work is taken from the Gospel of John chapters 18 and 19. Bach used Martin Luther's translation of the Bible with only slight modifications. The text for the opening prayer Herr, unser Herrscher, dessen Ruhm as well as the arias, chorales and the penultimate chorus Ruht wohl, ihr heiligen Gebeine each come from various other sources. It is interesting to note also that two recitative passages, dealing with Peter crying after his betrayal and the temple veil ripped during the crucification are not contained within the Gosple of John, but of Matthew. These interpolated passasges were later eliminated.


The Chorus and orchestra of Kazan State Conservatoire conducted by Leo Kremer
Chorus "Herr, Herr, Herr, unser Herrscher"
:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:48 pm

85. George Friedric Handel -
Giulio Cesare (1724)



Recording

Title: Giulio Cesare
Performer: Magdalena Kozena, Marijana Mijanovic, Anne Sofie Von Otter
Director: Marc Minkowski
Year: 2003
Length: 3 hours 30 minutes

Review

We haven't had an opera in quite a while, but the wait was definitely worth it. Giulio Cesare is a pretty great opera seria by Handel. This music is just stupendous, and even if it lacks spectacular choruses, having only three very short ones throughout the thing the arias are so beautiful that they make up for it.

There are problems in this opera, but they are dictated by the medium of opera seria, more than by Handel's ability. For example, when watching this opera the practice of making arias da capo can at times be slightly boring. The fact that each area, even if it lasts for 9 minutes consists of about 4 lines of text endlessly repeated can become tiring. This problem is less obvious when listening to a recording, however. Still, when listening to the recording the recitatives are quite superfluous unless you understand Italian. While they do move the story along when you watch the opera, they do little in musical terms.

If you want to see this you can do no better than get the William Christie version recorded from the Glyndebourne Festival. The recorded version recommended is equally good, however.

Handel's areas are fiery and the instrumental music is just as important as the singer's part, truly beautiful and affecting music. The emotional aspect of this Opera is also much more developed and engaging than any opera we have had here before, this is essential, and it is hard to think that Handel's operas were forgotten for 200 years.

Final Grade


10/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

The roles of Cesare and Cleopatra, sung by the castrato Senesino and famous soprano Francesca Cuzzoni respectively, and which encompass eight arias and two recitatives accompagnati each, totally dispose of the vocal capabilities of the singers. Cornelia and Sesto are more static because they are completely taken by their primary emotions, she with pain because of her husband's death and constantly constrained to defend herself from Achilla and Tolomeo, and he consumed by vengeance for his father's death.

Cleopatra is a multifaceted character: she uses at first her womanly wiles to seduce Cesare and gain the throne of Egypt, and then becomes totally engaged in the love affair with Cesare. She has great arias of immense dramatic intensity Se pietà di me non senti (II, Cool and Piangerò la sorte mia (III, 3). Sensual character is described magnificently in the aria V'adoro, pupille, in which Cleopatra, in the guise of Lidia, appears to Cesare circondated by the Muses of Parnassus (II, 2). This number calls for two orchestras: one is an ensemble scene with strings with sordino, oboe, tiorba, harp, bassoons and viola da gamba concerante.

Va tacito, from the William Christie production, amazing:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Vie Nov 05, 2010 1:52 pm

86. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Six English Suites (c. 1725)



Recording

Title: Suites Anglaises
Performer: Christophe Rousset
Year: 2003
Length: 2 hours 6 minutes.

Review


This is out first of several solo harpsichord collections by JS Bach. They are, all of them very impressive technically and this is definitely no exception, but it also is not one of the best. These are of course the first set of Harpsichord suites composed by Bach.

The fact that they are not Bach's best harpsichord suites does not mean they are in any way bad, we are talking about a genius here, love him or hate him, this man was one of the greatest composers and innovators of all time. And it is in the lack of innovation, not the lack of quality, that he seems to lose points here.

Ok the Preludes are very interesting, being almost little concertos for the Harpsichord, but then the whole thing is mostly of French influence, and the ghost of Couperin flies all over it, particularly in the slower movements. So get it if you really love the harpsichord, if, like me, you think the harpsichord is a bit of an inferior version of a piano, you can leave them be... and cherish that Rameau.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

The use of the term English to describe the Suites was a later addition. The name is thought to date back to a claim made by the nineteenth-century Bach biographer Johann Nikolaus Forkel that they were composed for an English nobleman, although no evidence has emerged to substantiate this claim. There are several striking characteristics about the English Suites. Bach includes a highly virtuosic prelude for each, in a departure from the prevailing tradition dictating a strict progression of the dance movements (Allemande, Courante, Sarabande and Gigue). By comparison, the later French Suites and Partitas are less strict in form. The Sarabande and Gigue movements in each of the English Suites is never separated by more than a single (twinned) Menuet or Menuet-like movement. Finally, the English Suites are predominantly in the minor key.

Selected parts of Glenn Gould playing the English Suites by J. S. Bach:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 5:27 am


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 1 de 3. 1, 2, 3  Siguiente

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.