Buscar
 
 

Resultados por:
 


Rechercher Búsqueda avanzada

Últimos temas
» The Michael Zager Band - Let's All Chant
Dom Oct 27, 2013 1:16 am por CristianFC

» Voz pasiva: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 11:01 am por The Boss

» Oraciones condicionales Tipo I + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:57 am por The Boss

» Comparativos y superlativos: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:52 am por The Boss

» Present Perfect: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:50 am por The Boss

» There is / There are - Some / Any - A / An- Much / Many: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:48 am por The Boss

» El futuro + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:45 am por The Boss

» Futuro con "going to": Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:32 am por The Boss

» Pasado simple y verbos irregulares: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:07 am por The Boss

Navegación
 Portal
 Índice
 Miembros
 Perfil
 FAQ
 Buscar
Foro

Estadisticas web
Diciembre 2016
LunMarMiérJueVieSábDom
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Calendario Calendario

Foro

Estadisticas web

1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Página 3 de 3. Precedente  1, 2, 3

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 2:26 pm

112. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Musical Offering (1747)



Recording

Title: Musikalisches Opfer
Performer: Musica Antiqua Koln
Director: Reinhard Goebel
Year: 1979
Length: 50 minutes

Review

This is an interesting late piece by Bach, the story goes that he was given a musical theme by Frederick the Great and told to make it in a 6 voice fugue. Bach was obviously being mocked, but instead of flipping Freddy the bird, he came back with this.

And this is a pretty interesting set of variations on the little theme provided by the Emperor. So I think he came out of it pretty well. As always Bach isn't a great innovator and the piece is quite backward looking, there is no inkling of the classical period here, but he does Baroque very well indeed.

Taken out of its historical content this piece would be more impressive than it ends up being, Bach is looking back, not forward, but in the process he manages to make some pretty lovely music, and a very imaginative set of variations.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Some of the canons of the Musical Offering are represented in the original score by not more than a short monodic melody of a few measures, with a more or less enigmatic inscription in Latin above the melody. These compositions are called the riddle fugues (or sometimes, more appropriately, the riddle canons). The performer(s) is/are supposed to interpret the music as a multi-part piece (a piece with several intertwining melodies), while solving the "riddle". Some of these riddles have been explained to have more than one possible "solution", although nowadays most printed editions of the score give a single, more or less "standard" solution of the riddle, so that interpreters can just play, without having to worry about the Latin, or the riddle.

One of these riddle canons, "in augmentationem" (i.e. augmentation, the length of the notes gets longer), is inscribed "Notulis crescentibus crescat Fortuna Regis" (may the fortunes of the king increase like the length of the notes), while a modulating canon which ends a tone higher than it starts is inscribed "Ascendenteque Modulationis ascendat Gloria Regis" (as the modulation rises, so may the King's glory).

Ricercar a 6:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 2:36 pm

113. George Friedric Handel -
Judas Maccabaeus (1747)



Recording

Title: Judas Maccabaeus
Performer: King's Consort
Director: Robert King
Year: 1992
Length: 2 hours 30 minutes

Review

Handel is a master of Oratorios, after the amazing Messiah we get Judas Maccabaeus, another pretty good one. It is not, however, as good as Messiah, and of course it is not as immediately recognisable as a piece of music.

Still, there is plenty to like here, this is a much more warlike piece of music than Messiah, for obvious reasons, the theme lends itself to it. And that is quite good, but frankly it is only apparent in the second and third act, and it becomes a kind of bottom heavy piece. The first act, beautiful as it is, does not have the same "oomph" of the rest of the work.

We are fast approaching the end of the baroque, and this piece is very much a part of it, this is baroque taken to its pinnacle, much like the Messiah oratorio. Honestly if you only need one Handel oratorio go with Messiah, but if you want to explore further, this would be a good place to go.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

"See, the Conqu'ring hero comes", from Judas Maccabaeus, became well-known later as the music was invariably played by brass bands at the opening of new railway lines and stations in Britain during the 19th century and is one of the movements in Sir Henry Wood's Fantasia on British Sea Songs.

O Lovely Peace:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 2:41 pm

114. Johann Sebastian Bach -
Mass In B Minor (c. 1749)[/b
]


[b]Recording


Title: Mass In B Minor
Performers: Monteverdi Choir, English Baroque Soloists
Director: John Eliot Gardiner
Year: 1985
Length: 2 hours

Review


If you enjoyed the choral parts of Bach's passions this is very much the place to go to next. The Mass in B minor is the corollary of Bach's choir work and goes all the way from tender to absolutely noisy.

As an advantage in relation to the passions, the Mass has no recitatives obviously, but it never quite reaches the levels of some of the choirs in Matthew's or the opening choir in John's Passion. Still, the whole of the mass is quite enjoyable.

The two Cds of this edition actually split the mass neatly into the Kyrie and Gloria in the first CD and the rest in the 2nd CD which was most certainly composed later. Still the highlight for me is the last movement of the Agnus Dei, a properly explosive end to the last Bach vocal composition recording on this list.

Final Grade


9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

It is suggested that the piece belongs in the same category as the Art of Fugue as a summation of Bach's deep lifelong involvement in choral settings and theology. It is generally regarded as one of the supreme achievements of "classical" music. Alberto Basso summarises the work as follows: "The Mass in B minor is the consecration of a whole life: started in 1733 for 'diplomatic' reasons, it was finished in the very last years of Bach's life, when he had already gone blind. This monumental work is a synthesis of every stylistic and technical contribution the Cantor of Leipzig made to music. But it is also the most astounding spiritual encounter between the worlds of Catholic glorification and the Lutheran cult of the cross." It has been described in the 19th century by Hans Georg Nägeli as "The Greatest Artwork of All Times and All People." Even though it had never been performed, its importance was appreciated by some of Bach's greatest successors - by the beginning of the 19th century Forkel and Haydn possessed copies, and Beethoven made two attempts to acquire a score.

Munich Bach Orchestra, Karl Richter, Et Ressurexit :


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 2:44 pm

115. George Friedric Handel -
Music for the Royal Fireworks (1749)



Recording

Title: Musick For the Royal Fireworks
Performer: Kings's Consort
Director: Robert King
Year: 1989

Review

Wow, this is Handel at his most epic, particularly in his amazing overture, where he produces some of his most famous music, but also some of his most bombastic and catchy stuff. You just sing along with it throughout.

This recording is a particularly good one at bringing out the majesty of it all, Robert King throws away strings and sticks to the drums, brass and wind instruments which represent how it would have been originally played in all its glory.

This is like the last great explosion of Baroque pomp, now that the classical age is fast approaching, and you couldn't have much better than this, really. It is music that touches the little epic bone the we all have. An amazing recording for a truly astounding piece of work.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The performing musicians were in a specially constructed building which had been designed by Servandoni, a theatre designer. The music provided a background for the royal fireworks. However the display was not as successful as the music. The enormous wood building caught fire due to the fall of the bas relief of George II. However, the music had been performed publicly six days earlier, on 21 April 1749 when there was a full rehearsal of the music at Vauxhall Gardens. Over twelve thousand people, each paying 2s 6d, rushed for it, causing a three-hour traffic jam of carriages, after the main route to the area south of the river was closed (after the new London Bridge's central arch collapsed and it had to be closed). The work is in five movements.

A very young Robert King directs Music for the Royal Fireworks:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 2:48 pm

116. Johann Sebastian Bach -
The Art Of Fugue (c. 1750)



Recording

Title: Der Kunst der Fugue
Performer: Davitt Moroney
Year: 1995

Review

So Bach comes to an end, quite literally, with the Art of Fugue. Again I repeat my personal bias against harpsichord, but let's not let get that in the way of what is actually quite a great piece of music.

The work consists of a number of pieces all based on the same theme, which is repeated at the start of almost all of the pieces, and in this recording the pieces are ordered in order of complexity, so it just spirals out, and that is quite an interesting effect.

The we get to the last fugue, which just stops, this makes for the most poignant moment in the whole thing, frankly I think that interpreters which fade the track out or simply "complete" it are doing it a disservice. The track just stops because Bach, supreme baroque composer died, and that moment is something else. Moroney adds a "completed" version at the end of the recording which is frankly unnecessary. Well, we are well rid of the Harpsichord from now on, but are also unfortunately rid of Bach, I wish he could have gotten his hands on a piano.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

In 2006, the Slovenian industrial rock group Laibach (part of the NSK collective) performed their interpretation of Kunst der Fuge in Leipzig, Germany, as part of the "Bach Week" celebrations, following in 2008 with a series of live performances across Europe and the issuing of an album.

Glenn Gould plays Bach's Art of Fugue, fugues 1, 4, 2
Recorded in 1957, May 12, at the Small Hall of the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow, during a lecture-concert Gould gave before an audience of soviet students.




Última edición por JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 3:14 pm, editado 1 vez

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  JM el Lun Nov 15, 2010 2:52 pm

117. George Friedric Handel -
Theodora (1750)



Recording

Title: Theodora
Performer: Susan Gritton, Paul Agnew, Robin Blaze, Gabrielli Consort and Players
Director: Paul McCreesh
Year: 2000
Length: about 2 hours 40 minutes (3CDs)

Review

We say goodbye to Handel, just after we have said goodbye to Bach, with this Oratorio by the master of Oratorios. Interestingly it is also quite a big departure for Handel oratorios, it is actually more similar in structure to Handel's operas than his previous oratorios.

The arias are longer, the choirs much less in evidence, everything is more dramatic and the story is more contained than for example the sprawling Messiah which took up the whole life and after-death of Christ.

It is also one of his most beautiful oratorios, never as bombastic as the previous two we have had on this list, it is much more restrained, but also much more dramatic in a smaller sense of the word. More melodramatic I should perhaps say. This is not to say that there aren't some pretty amazing choirs, but the real outstanding bits of the work are the extended da capo arias, as good as any from his operas. That being said it doesn't capture the grandiosity of his other oratorios.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

There are two surviving quotes of Handel about Theodora. Morell quotes Handel as saying "The Jews will not come to it because it is a Christian story; and the ladies will not come because it is a virtuous one." Handel's colleague Burney took note when two musicians asked for free tickets for Messiah and Handel responded "Oh your servant, meine Herren! you are damnable dainty! you would not go to Theodora - there was room enough to dance there, when that was perform"!

Theodora was actually Handel's favorite of his oratorios. The composer himself ranked the final chorus of Act II, "He saw the lovely youth," "far beyond" "Hallelujah" in Messiah.

Act III, scenes 6-7
18-Didymus - aria -Didymus, Theodora - duo
19-Irene and Chorus
Conductor - William Christie, Director - Peter Sellars
Dawn Upshaw, David Daniels, Frode Olsen, Richard Croft and Lorraine Hunt
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1996)




JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) II- 1700-1750

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 9:03 am


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 3 de 3. Precedente  1, 2, 3

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.