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1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 24, 2010 3:38 pm

168. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart -
Piano Concerto no. 27 (1791)



Recording


Title: Piano Concertos No. 19 & 27
Performer: Clara Haskil
Director: Ferenc Fricsay
Year: 1957
Length: 30 minutes

Review

We finally come to the last of Mozart's Piano Concertos, and what a great one it is. Piano Concerto No. 27 contains what is possibly one of the most beautiful and original pieces of music by Mozart in its exquisite slow movement.

The very long first movement with its brighter mood and beautiful solo part is also an highlight, and if you have to listen to these two what is the point of leaving the also great third movement out.

It is with pieces like this that we will always wonder what Mozart would have done, had he lived. His musical style is quickly approaching the Romantic and he would surely have had no problem keeping up with Beethoven when the styles changed. But hey he died, so this is all supposition. Fortunately we can still listen to this.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The work followed by some years the series of highly successful concertos Mozart wrote for his own concerts, and by the time of its premiere Mozart was no longer so prominent a performer on the public stage. It is a popular assumption that this concerto was first performed at a concert on 4 March 1791 in Jahn's Hall by Mozart and by a clarinetist Joseph Bähr. Seen from today's state of scholarship however there is absolutely no proof that Mozart actually performed K. 595 on this day. The concert might well have been premiered by Mozart's pupil Barbara Ployer on the occasion of a public concert at the Auersperg palace in January 1791.
This was Mozart's last appearance in a public concert, as he took ill in September 1791 and died on 5 December 1791.

Aleksandar Madžar (Bösendorfer piano)
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by André Previn :




JM

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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 24, 2010 3:41 pm

169. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart -
Clarinet Concerto (1791)



Recording

Title: Complete Wind Concertos
Performer: Charles Neidich (clarinet), Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
Year: 1987
Length: 30 minutes

Review

They should really have made me go through this book during proof-reading. This is like the third occurrence of wrong image in 170 albums. A few days ago the book image for Clemenza di Tito was wrong and now this one is wrong. Oh well.

This is the last Mozart Concerto...sniff. And it is a corker! Yes it is. From the jubilant first movement through what is possibly the most delicate and moving piece of music composed by Mozart in the second movement back to a great finale. This doesn't sound like a man dying, even if the second movement is as beautiful as farewell as he could have composed... the Requiem, for all its brilliance, is a more stressful affair as a farewell it isn't really peaceful.

So again an essential piece of Mozart, it is a pity that the second movement, which is the perfect classical Adagio has been so overused in films and such, to the point where no one knows when they first heard it... I would like to remember what it is like to listen to it for the first time. Oh well.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Mozart originally wrote the work for basset clarinet, a special clarinet championed by Stadler that had a range down to low (written) C, instead of stopping at (written) E as standard clarinets do. As most clarinets could not play the low notes which Mozart wrote to highlight this instrument, Mozart's publisher arranged a version of the concerto with the low notes transposed to regular range, and did not publish the original version. This has proven a problematic decision, as the autograph no longer exists, having been pawned by Stadler, and until the mid 20th century musicologists did not know that the only version of the concerto written by Mozart's hand had not been heard since Stadler's lifetime. Once the problem was discovered, attempts were made to reconstruct the original version, and new basset clarinets have been built for the specific purpose of performing Mozart's concerto and clarinet quintet. There can no longer be any doubt that the concerto was composed for an extended range clarinet. Numerous recordings of various restorations exist and some of the notable ones include Sabine Meyer with the Berlin Philharmonic, David Shifrin with the Mostly Mozart Orchestra, and Erich Hoeprich with the Old Fairfield Academy (notable for Hoeprich's use of a period-style basset clarinet based on Stadler's of his own manufacture instead of a modern-style instrument).

Second Movement:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 24, 2010 3:44 pm

170. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart -
Requiem (1791)



Recording

Title: Requiem
Performers: Academy of St. Martin In the Fields & Chorus
Director: Neville Marriner
Year: 1990
Length: 51 minutes

Review

Here we are at the end of Mozart's output, quite literally, his beautiful scary and powerful unfinished Requiem. This is one of those pieces that are powerful not only for the music itself but also for the circumstances in which they were produced, a mass for the dead where the composer dies before finishing it.

Critics have said that Mozart would still be in the history books and recognised as the amazing composer that he was if this was the only thing he ever composed. And he probably would indeed, this is probably my favourite piece of Sacred Music, there is such horror to some of the pieces, such beauty to others that there is something for everyone here, well maybe except for someone in a dancing mood.

This is one of those pieces that really deserves close listening, it is nothing short of amazing. My favourite part is the Confutatis Maledictis, a section which is alternately panicked and quiet, an almost schizoid piece of music followed by the beautiful Lacrimosa, but the whole thing is an experience to be listened to beginning to end. Unfortunately you can tell that from the Domine Jesu onwards the brilliance is not as present, a sign that the Requiem was unfinished and completed by a student of Mozart.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

At the time of Mozart's death on 5 December 1791 he had only completed the opening movement (Requiem aeternam) in all of the orchestral and vocal parts. The following Kyrie (a double fugue), and most of the Sequence (from Dies Irae to Confutatis), is complete only in the vocal parts and the continuo (the figured organ bass), though occasionally some of the prominent orchestral parts have been briefly indicated, such as the violin part of the Confutatis and the musical bridges in the Recordare. The last movement of the Sequence, the Lacrimosa, breaks off after only eight bars and was unfinished. The following two movements of the Offertorium were again partially done -- the Domine Jesu Christe in the vocal parts and continuo (up until the fugue, which contains some indications of the violin part) and the Hostias in the vocal parts only.

Confutatis followed by Lacrimosa:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Miér Nov 24, 2010 3:47 pm

171. Domenico Cimarosa -
Il Matrimonio Segreto (1792)



Recording


Title: Il Matrimonio Segreto
Performers: Badioli, Ratti, Sciuti, Stignani, Orchestra del Teatro de La Scala di Milano
Director: Nino Sanzogno
Year: 1956
Length: 2 hours

Review

Firstly I would not necessarily recommend this version of the Opera. This version is missing the recitatives and if you are interested in the story you will need them. For that you can get the Barenboim version which also has the advantage of being more recent.

But then it is hard to know if you would want a copy of this in the first place. Ok, Cimarosa is only second to Mozart in opera composition in the Classical era... well... that is faint praise at best, being second-place to Mozart makes his exponentially worse than Mozart.

If this is the best Cimarosa opera, as seems to be the consensus, it is sorely lacking in the sophistication of Mozart, both in musical and dramatic terms. It is comparable in terms of subject to the three De La Ponte operas (Nozze, Don Giovanni and Cosi Fan Tutte), and that is about it. It can be mildly amusing, and some of the arias are also mildly amusing, but there is very little juice here, no staggering pieces or emotional depth to the characters. So, eh.

Final Grade

7/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Cimarosa's only work still to be regularly performed, it is arguably one of the greatest 18th century opera buffa apart from those by Mozart. Its premiere was the occasion of the longest encore in operatic history; Leopold II was so delighted that he ordered supper served to the company and the entire opera repeated immediately after.

Cara Non Dubitar:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 12:00 pm

172. Joseph Haydn -
Symphony no. 101, "Clock" (1794)



Recording

Title: The 12 "London" Symphonies
Performers: London Philharmonic
Director: Eugen Jochum
Year: 1973
Length: 28 minutes

Review

Mozart is dead but Haydn is fortunately still around to keep us all in a cheery mood. After the famous musical joke of the "Surprise" symphony he has another little play with the second movement having a "tic-toc" theme going all the way through it.

The Symphony does not live only of its namesake "clock", however, in fact there is plenty to love here. The first movement starts with a beautifully creepy adagio only to erupt into complete exuberance in one of the greatest transitions in any Haydn Symphony.

Haydn is again a composer full of lightness and joy, and fortunately he is still gonna be alive for a while so we can enjoy plenty more of his stuff... although there is only one more symphony by him on the list. The performance is flawless as would be expected with a real verve, making even the slow movement totally whimsical.

Final Grade

9/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The work was premiered on 3 March, 1794, in the Hanover Square Rooms, as part of a concert series featuring Haydn's work organized by his colleague and friend Johann Peter Salomon; a second performance took place a week later.

As was generally true for the London symphonies, the response of the audience was very enthusiastic. The Morning Chronicle reported:

As usual the most delicious part of the entertainment was a new grand Overture [that is, symphony] by HAYDN; the inexhaustible, the wonderful, the sublime HAYDN! The first two movements were encored; and the character that pervaded the whole composition was heartfelt joy. Ever new Overture he writes, we fear, till it is heard, he can only repeat himself; and we are every time mistaken.

FCHS Symphony Orchestra
Haydn Symphony No. 101 - The Clock, Mvt. 1:

FCHS Symphony Orchestra - Haydn Symphony No 101 from Jon Sawyer on Vimeo.


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 12:07 pm

173. Joseph Haydn -
Symphony no. 104, "London" (1795)



Recording

Title: Symphonies 83 Hen, 101 Clock & 104 London
Performers: Berlin Philharmonic
Director: Herbert Von Karajan
Year: 1975
Length: 25 minutes

Review

This is the last Symphony composed by Haydn and it is really the culmination of his Symphonic achievement. It is, in my humble opinion, the best Haydn symphony of them all, from the majestic and sombre start to the folk-song like ending there is not a boring, or less than brilliant moment in the whole thing.

We can tell how fast the 19th century is approaching by the elements that you can spot in this symphony which would be completely at ease in a Beethoven work of the romantic period, for example. The third movement prefigures the Pastoral Symphony, the second movement almost prefigures Mahler's adagios in a couple of moments! And the last movement reminds me of Dvorak's New World Symphony... but maybe that's just me.

Definitely an essential piece of music by the "father of the symphony" who seems to not only have made the whole style popular, but to have developed it to a great level of perfection. Beyond essential.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The exuberant finale, in fast tempo and in sonata form, opens in the mode of folk music using a drone bass and a theme often claimed to have originated as a Croatian folk song; for details see Haydn and folk music. The development section settles on the dominant of the main key, as is typical, but atypically, the recapitulation does not occur immediately. Instead, the development is extended with a section in F sharp minor, after which the recapitulation in D major follows immediately.

Last movement... I know this isn't the best orchestra for it, but they are trying!:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 12:29 pm

174. Joseph Haydn -
Trumpet Concerto (1796)



Recording


Title: Concertos For Oboe, Trumpet, Harpsichord
Performers: Mark Bennet, The English Concert
Director: Trevor Pinnock
Year: 1990
Length: 16 minutes

Review


An interesting concerto by Haydn which explores the potentiality of the new invention at the time: the chromatic trumpet. So this trumpet has keys and therefore can go places trumpets before it couldn't and that is what makes it a better instrument. Still it is not the most fascinating of Haydn's orchestral works.

Compared with the last Haydn symphonies we've had here this sounds like a bit of a throwback, a bit like early classical/late baroque. The fact that it is not as forward looking as some other stuff he was doing at this time does not take merit away from the piece, which is still lovely.

The trumpet solo part is the real highlight here, delicate and putting the new instrument to great use in it's exploration of the lower register. In the end therefore it is all a bit underwhelming, even if it is quite pleasant.

Final Grade


8/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

Anton Weidinger reputably had developed a keyed trumpet which could play chromatically throughout its entire range. Before this, the trumpet was commonly valveless and could only play a limited range of harmonic notes by altering lip pressure. These harmonic notes were clustered in the higher registers, so previous trumpet concertos could only play melodies at very high pitches (e.g., Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 2). Haydn's concerto includes melodies in the lower register, exploiting the capabilities of the new instrument.

There were attempts all over Europe around the mid-classical era to expand the range of the trumpet using valves, and Weidinger's idea of drilling holes and covering them with flute-like keys proved reasonably unpopular, due to their poorer quality of sound. Thus the natural trumpet still had continual use in the classical orchestra whilst the keyed trumpet had barely any repetoire. The valved trumpets used today started to appear in the 1830s.

Tine Thing Helseth plays the third movement:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 1:30 pm

175. Luigi Cherubini -
Médée (1797)




Recording

Title: Medea
Performers: Maria Callas, Ginno Penno
Director: Leonard Bernstein
Year: 1953
Length: 2 hours

Review

I detest Maria Callas' singing style. It is ugly, strident and almost to the level of caricature. And then not to solve any problems I get the shittiest recording quality of all times here, it's recorded off the radio in 1953!

The choir gets too distorted for comfort, Callas gets even more strident to the point of distortion, you hear people shuffling about, coughing, you even hear what seems to be a prompter in the second or third act... I don't remember.

What is most frustrating about it is the fact that is actually seems to be an interesting opera, even if Leonard Bernstein seems to be conducting it in a way completely irrespective of history. Either that or Cherubini has just invented verismo and no one told me.

Final Grade

4/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The role of Médée is famed for its difficulty. Famous interpreters of the role in the 20th century included Maria Callas, Eileen Farrell, Dame Gwyneth Jones, Magda Olivero, Leyla Gencer, Leonie Rysanek, Anja Silja, Maralin Niska, Marisa Galvany, Montserrat Caballé, Sylvia Sass, Shirley Verrett and, in the restored original-version, Phyllis Treigle.

Maria Callas, Scala di Milano 1961, Medea, luigi Cherubini. Directed by Thomas Schippers. Fragment "Taci, Giasone":


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 1:39 pm

176. Joseph Haydn -
String Quartets op.76 (1797)



Recording

Title: The Complete String Quartets
Performers: The Angeles Quartet
Year: 1994-99
Length: 2 hours (2 CDs off the 21 CD set)

Review

These are some great string quartets by Haydn, pretty much the best collection of string quartets we've had here. Again, much like the Symphony, Haydn is seen as the father of the String Quartet and here he brings it to a great level of perfection.

Thankfully other equally skilled composers in the string quartet division are coming up soon in the Romantic era (Beethoven and then Schubert) but for the best of Classical age string quartets it is hard to beat this.

The greatest highlight here is the third quartet, the slow movement using the tune that has become famous as the German national anthem, but the first movement is equally impressive with a decidedly folksy tune to it. The folksyness of Haydn is one of my favourite things about him, he was not afraid to learn from the people, and just makes for some jaunty, sing-alongable tracks.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Although the quartets were completed by 1797, shown by accounts of visitors hearing them performed in early 1797, they were not published until 1799. Correspondence between Haydn and his publishers reveal that there was confusion regarding the release of his quartets; the composer promised the London publishing house of Messrs. Longman Clementi & Co. first publishing rights, but a lack of communication with the firm led Haydn to worry that a Vienna publication might accidentally release the complete set of quartets first, causing him to lose money from London.

These quartets are among Haydn's most ambitious chamber works. They deviate more than previous quartets from the expected sonata form, and Haydn emphasized thematic continuity, seamlessly and continually passing motives from one instrument to another (Grave 312).

Deutschland Deutschland Uber Alles, heh Second movement of the third quartet:


JM

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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 3:09 pm

177. Ludwig van Beethoven -
Piano Sonata in C minor, op.13, "Pathetique" (1798)



Recording

Title: Favourite Piano Sonatas
Performer: Vladimir Ashkenazy
Year: 1981
Length: 18 minutes

Review


The very name of the sonata shows the great leap forward that this is. The sense of Pathos here is great, and that would be one of the defining characteristics of Romantic music.

That said this is still Beethoven on the Classical side, even if the future is clearly apparent in what must be one of the great piano sonatas of all time, surely the most famous one right after the Moonlight sonata, also by Beethoven.

So we start a new great composer with this, Beethoven will keep us companied for quite a while and that is nothing but a good thing. This sonata really needs to be listened to, and I bet most you reading have heard it before, but in the context of late classical music it makes a particular impact in how forward looking it is. Amazing.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The Pathétique Sonata is perhaps the earliest of Beethoven's compositions to achieve widespread and enduring popularity. It is widely represented on the concert programs and recordings of professional pianists. As one of the more famous Beethoven pieces, it has been incorporated into several works of popular culture (e.g. it is used as the theme of the film The Man Who Wasn't There and Billy Joel's "This Night" from his album An Innocent Man). Beethoven's Pathetique remains one of his most popular sonatas.

Beethoveen - Pathétique sonata - Adagio cantabile performed by Daniel Barenboim:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 3:15 pm

178. Joseph Haydn -
Mass in D minor, "Nelson" (1798)



Recording


Title: Missa "in Angustiis": "Nelson" Mass, Te Deum
Performers: English Concert & Choir
Director: Trevor Pinnock
Year: 1987
Length: 50 minutes

Review


We haven't been as flush with church music in the recent past as we were during the Baroque, and that is not a bad thing. Sacred music is best digested slowly, when there is too much of it is can kind of meld together. Fortunately for us a small trickle of Sacred Music is very enjoyable, when it is of such high quality it is a great pleasure indeed.

This is a hard-hitting mass. It seems weird to us now that someone would want to go to church to listen to the cutting edge of music... but that is pretty much what people were doing here. This Haydn piece is a showcase of amazing composition both at an orchestral level and at a choral level.

Haydn has a limited orchestra with only strings, trumpets and timpani. He makes the best of a bad situation by infusing the mass with great martial thundering and contrasting it with moments of absolute sweetness. More impressive than that is the sheer horror with which it starts. The Kyrie is an astounding and panicked piece of music. The Benedictus goes into an amazing Martial march, sacred music at some of its most original. Highly recommended.

Final Grade

10/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Though in 1798, when he wrote this Mass, Haydn's reputation was at its peak, his world was in turmoil. Napoleon had won four major battles with Austria in less than a year. The previous year, in early 1797, his armies had crossed the Alps and threatened Vienna itself. In May of 1798, Napoleon invaded Egypt to destroy Britain's trade routes to the East.

The summer of 1798 was therefore a terrifying time for Austria, and when Haydn finished this Mass, his own title, in the catalogue of his works, was "Missa in Angustiis" or "Mass in Time of Distress." What Haydn didn't know when he wrote the Mass — but what he and his audience heard (perhaps on the very day of the first performance September 15) was that on Aug. 1, Napoleon had been dealt a stunning defeat in the Battle of the Nile by English forces led by Admiral Horatio Nelson. Because of this coincidence, the Mass gradually acquired the nickname "Lord Nelson Mass." The title became indelible when in 1800, Lord Nelson himself visited the Esterhazys (accompanied by his British mistress, Lady Hamilton), and may have heard the Mass performed.

Classica Israel - Hadera & Emek Hefer Choir Conducted by Omri Hadari- Kyrie:



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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 3:18 pm

179. Joseph Haydn -
The Creation (1798)



Recording


Title: Die Schopfung
Performers: Balthasar-Neumann-Chor, Balthasar-Neuman-Ensemble
Director: Thomas Hengelbrock
Year: 2002
Length: 1 hours and 40 minutes

Review


Many claim this to be Haydn's masterpiece, and I agree to some extent, in the sense that it is a complete work in the dramatic and musical sense, and completely integrated in those two parts. The part where God creates light is truly impressive, as is the opening Chaos. Still, the work is too dependent on the text to make sense.

The fact that it is too dependent on the text makes it much less appealing just to listen to. It needs understanding, if you understand what is being said, or can follow a libretto, your enjoyment will be considerably superior. The whole thing is full of musical representations of what is being said that make a lot more sense if you understand what is happening.

This, as an oratorio, is midway between the mass and the opera and the drama works pretty well, but it is definitely a work that you should give your time to. If you don't get where you are at it will sound verbose in its recitatives only really shining in the Choirs and Arias. Ideally you should learn German and then listen to it. As a way to recount the story it would be ideal for children... if you actually wanted to teach them Creationism... which you don't.


Final Grade


8/10

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The pleasure of experiencing Haydn and van Swieten's Die Schöpfung lies less in the inevitable trajectory of the plot—we all know the story, and it contains no real sense of conflict—than in the wide-eyed wonder with which the composer visits its familiar contours. A childlike quality pervades the work, as if Haydn were relating the narrative to young listeners who had never heard it before." -- James Keller

William Christie records the Creation:


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 3:23 pm

180. John Field -
Piano Concertos (1799 - 1832)



Recording

Title: Piano Concertos Nos. 2 and 4
Performers: Benjamin Firth, Northern Sinfonia
Director: David Haslam
Year: 1996
Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Review

At first this album might seem like a big step forward into romanticism, well in fact the two concertos on this recording are from 1811 and 1814 respectively and in that sense they are really not that innovative... although they would be in 1799.

This just goes to show how fast music is going to evolve in the next 15 years, from classical with a hint of romantic to full-blown romantic. Field is an interesting character in the sense that he was the first person to compose nocturnes, that Chopin would then make so famous as piano pieces. In these concertos you can hear nocturne-like movements in the two slow movements, very delicate pieces indeed.

The two concertos are OK, nothing to write home about, but as said before the short slow movements stand-out for their nocturne-like qualities and the first movement of the fourth concerto stands out for its martial influences in the orchestra. Another interesting thing is Field's use of folk music, but again these concerts are well into the 19th century so that shouldn't be as strange as when Haydn did it for example.

Final Grade


8/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

He died in Moscow two years later. Because Field's faith was unclear -- his parents were nominally Protestant, but he had had a Catholic wedding -- there is a legend that when he was questioned on his deathbed by a priest his friends had procured about which religion he practiced, he said, "I am a clavicist" (Je suis claveciste).

Piano Concerto no. 2, 1811
3. Moderato innocente


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Re: 1001 classical works (The best) III- 1751-1799

Mensaje  JM el Jue Nov 25, 2010 4:05 pm

181. Joseph Haydn -
String Quartets, op. 77 (1799)



Recording

Title: String Quartets Opus 77
Performers: Quatuor Mosaiques
Year: 1989
Length: 1 hour

Review

Here we have the last string quartets by Haydn... and unfortunately there is only one more piece by him on the list. So his joie de vivre will end up in the earth like it does to us all. Cheery.

Frankly I was not as impressed by these two Quartets was I was by Opus 76, which sounded a lot more experimental and were also more attractive. These are the only two quartets in this Opus which was supposed to consist of 6 quartets, but Haydn just never got around to finishing it, and you can feel him a bit uninspired here.

Still, they are very good, only not as immensely impressive as his previous ones on this list. So if you are really in love with his String Quartets you could do worse than get this, but if not... leave it be.

Final Grade

8/10

Trivia


From Wikipedia:

The return to Vienna in 1795 marked the last turning point in Haydn's career. Although his musical style evolved little, his intentions as a composer changed. While he had been a servant, and later a busy entrepreneur, Haydn wrote his works quickly and in profusion, with frequent deadlines. As a rich man, Haydn now felt he had the privilege of taking his time and writing for posterity.

Fine Arts Quartet (Ralph Evans, Efim Boico, Chauncey Patterson, Wolfgang Laufer) rehearsing the first movement (Allegro Moderato) of the G Major Haydn String Quartet Op.77 No.1, at the Wittem Monastery Library, Holland on October 8, 2008:




JM

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