Buscar
 
 

Resultados por:
 


Rechercher Búsqueda avanzada

Últimos temas
» The Michael Zager Band - Let's All Chant
Dom Oct 27, 2013 1:16 am por CristianFC

» Voz pasiva: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 11:01 am por The Boss

» Oraciones condicionales Tipo I + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:57 am por The Boss

» Comparativos y superlativos: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:52 am por The Boss

» Present Perfect: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:50 am por The Boss

» There is / There are - Some / Any - A / An- Much / Many: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:48 am por The Boss

» El futuro + Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:45 am por The Boss

» Futuro con "going to": Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:32 am por The Boss

» Pasado simple y verbos irregulares: Ejercicios
Vie Jun 21, 2013 10:07 am por The Boss

Navegación
 Portal
 Índice
 Miembros
 Perfil
 FAQ
 Buscar
Foro

Estadisticas web
Diciembre 2016
LunMarMiérJueVieSábDom
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Calendario Calendario

Foro

Estadisticas web

1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Página 3 de 3. Precedente  1, 2, 3

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 4:29 pm

308. Felix Mendelssohn –
Violin Concerto in E minor (1844)



Recording

Title: Bruch, Mendelssohn, Mozart: Violin Concertos
Performed by Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields with Joshua Bell
Conducted by Neville Marriner
Year: 1988

Review

These are rereleases of previous recordings by Joshua Bell the teenager recorded in 1988.
The principal difference between these recordings and the work Bell does today is in style. Compared to his now lean and mean approach, Bell played in a warmer, more romantic style in these recordings, where he was given appropriate accompaniment by the Academy of St. Martin's in the Fields led by Neville Marriner in this romantic concerto.

Since Bell later re-recorded the Mendelssohn concerto (in 2000 with Roger Norrington and the Salzburg Academy Orchestra) it is easiest to note the differences in that work. The timings for the Mendelssohn are consistently broader in the older recording and his style is consistently more romantic.

Bell and Marriner play up the finale into a blaze or romantic language, picking up the pace at the very end. The Bruch concerto is similar in style and temperament. To my ears, the playing by the Academy and leadership by Marriner in the Mendelssohn is inferior to the 2000 recording.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 (1844), written for Ferdinand David, has become one of the most popular of all of Mendelssohn's compositions. David, who had worked closely with Mendelssohn during the piece's preparation, gave the premiere of the concerto on his Guarneri violin.


Mendelssohn violin Concerto. Cadenza by Joshua Bell. Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, April 2008:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 4:43 pm

309. Hector Berlioz -
Le carnaval romain (1843)



Recording

Title: Berlioz Overtures
Performed by Dresden Staatskapelle
Conducted by Sir Colin Davis
Year: 1998

Review

If you have feared that complacency or advancing years have weakened Davis' place as a major Berlioz champion, hear this disc as soon as possible! With the Dresden Orchestra achieving both crystalline textures and blazing power, he illuminates this volcanic but finely-wrought music as brilliantly as he ever has. The Corsair Overture has everything: rhythmic swagger,steady yet flexible pacing, ,transparent winds and strings, and electrifying ( but affectionate) brass playing. The sound also successfully balances sharp detail with a powerful resonant glow.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Le carnaval romain, ouverture pour orchestre (English: Roman Carnival Overture) Opus 9. Composed in 1843 and first performed at the Salle Herz, Paris on 3 February 1844. A stand-alone overture intended for concert performance, made up of material and themes from Berlioz's opera Benvenuto Cellini, including some music from the opera's carnival scene - hence the overture's title. It is scored for large orchestra, is in the key of A major, and features a prominent and famous solo for the cor anglais.

Le carnaval romain ("Roman Carnival"), Op. 9 performed by Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Andrew Litton, conductor.
Recorded at Gewandhaus Leipzig, 1994:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 6:18 pm

310. Frédéric Chopin –
Piano Sonata no. 3 in B minor (1844)



Recording

Title: Dinu Lipatti plays Chopin, Enescu, Ravel, Liszt & Brahms (Great recordings of the century)
Performer: Dinu Lupatti
Year: 1947
Length: 24 minutes

Review

Dinu Lipatti was perhaps the greatest pianist of the modern age. Such hyperbole is usually suspect in a review, and no doubt many will argue with it, but I find the recorded evidence to support the claim. Rubenstein may have been brasher, Horowitz splashier, Serkin more intellectual, Giesking more delicate, but Lipatti combines more of the virtues of a great pianist into a complete whole than any other giant of the century.
This recording is a case in point. Playing the music of composers as diverse as Chopin, Lizst, Ravel and Enescu, Lipatti shows many sides of his musical personality. The Chopin Sonata is by far the best recording of this work I have ever heard. The Sonata is phenomenally difficult, and yet, listening to Lipatti's version you are not aware of the difficulty. Lipatti tosses off the most fiendish run as if it were Chopsticks...and you are left to marvel at the sheer beauty of Chopin's creation. The third movement especially is breathtaking. This is an extremely difficult movement to pull off well. It hangs together by a line that tends to be hidden in the music, but Lipatti finds this line. The performance has a spirit and poetry that I've never heard equalled.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The work opens on a martial note, the heavy chords and filigree in the opening of the first movement giving way to a more melodic second theme, eventually leading to the conclusion of the exposition in the relative major, D. Motives of the original theme emerge in the development, which, unconventionally, returns to the second theme (as opposed to the first) for the recapitulation. The movement concludes in B major.
The scherzo, in the distant key of E flat and in strict ternary form, characterised by ebullient quaver runs in the right hand, with a more demure chordal middle section. If played slowly, the main E-flat theme sounds somewhat similar to the E-flat melody from the composer's First Ballade. Unlike the scherzo of the B-flat minor sonata (and, indeed, the rest of Chopin's contributions to the genre outside of the sonatas), it is exceptionally short, typically lasting barely two minutes in performance.
Despite a stormy introduction in dotted rhythm, the largo is serene, almost nocturne-like; a mellow and expansive middle section, again characterised by quaver figuration in the background of an intensely harmonic line, separates the more cantabile outer sections in B major. It is the most musically profound of the movements (Kraemer, 1991), in terms of a sustained melody and innovative harmonic progression; it rivals the extensive first movement in length alone.
Its turbulent and dramatic introduction–a rising harmonic progression left hanging on a high dominant seventh–aside, the finale, in B minor, is pervaded by a "galloping" rhythm; emphasis in the melodic line on the first and third beats of each half-measure outlines the fifth through eighth degrees of a harmonic minor scale, in this case the F# and B, lending prominence to the augmented second between the sixth and raised seventh scale degrees, the G and A#. The overall melody, chromatic yet rooted in the minor tonic, contributes a dark mood to these primary sections. A more triumphant second theme in B major, repeated twice in the movement's A-B-A-B-A form, appears quite suddenly at the conclusion of the first (likewise when repeated); eventually rising during fleet-fingered runs over a left-hand melody, it tumbles back to a dramatic restatement of the main theme in both of its appearances. The piece concludes in a jubilant B major coda.

Katsaris plays Chopin Sonata No. 3 Mov.4 Finale:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 6:27 pm

311. Robert Schumann –
Piano Concerto (1845



Recording

Title: Piano Concerto
Performer: Sviatoslav Richter
Orchestra: Warsaw National Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Stanislaw Wislocki, Witold Rowicki
Year: 1958


Review

If you want to judge a pianist's versatility, listen to his or her recording of the Schumann Piano Concerto. It requires virtually everything a pianist should have to offer: poetry, virtuosity, expansive expression alternating with poised restraint. What a glorious test piece this is. Richter, who was famous for his Schumann playing, passes every test here. His meltingly beautiful delivery of Schumann's melodies touches the heart, and his execution of the most difficult passages is so smooth and effortless that it never calls a bit of attention to itself. In this piece and the Introduction and Allegro, the excellent orchestra also covers itself with glory. The solo pieces are no less wonderful. The way Richter plays the difficult Toccata is almost scary in its combination of power and velocity.


Trivia

From Wikipedia:
Schumann had begun several piano concerti before this one: In 1828, he had begun one in E-flat major; from 1829-31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.
In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to make the completed work. It turned out to be the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.
The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work's dedicatee, conducted.
The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg's concerto, like Schumann's, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano's entrance.


Martha Argerich plays Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in A minor Op. 54 by Robert Schumann with the CBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Franz-Paul Decker (1977).
Mvt. I. Allegro affettuoso:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 6:57 pm

312. Richard Wagner –
Tannhäuser (1845)



Recording

Title: Piano Concerto
Performed by Berlin State Choir
with Dorothea Roschmann, Waltraud Meier, Thomas Hampson, Peter Seiffert, Rene Pape, Hanno Muller-Brachmann, Gunnar Gudbjornsson, Alfred Reiter, Jane Eaglen
Conducted by Daniel Barenboim
Year: 2001


Review

This vividly recorded new Tannhäuser has much to recommend it. Daniel Barenboim's leadership not only keeps things moving so that the somewhat stilted drama actually takes wing, he elicits some of the most beautiful playing ever from the Berlin State Opera forces: lush strings; pointed, crisp brass; reedy, articulate winds. Thomas Hampson's Wolfram is sensitive and handsomely sung, if on a slightly small scale; Rene Pape is by far the most impressive Landgraf on disc; and the supporting cast is topnotch. Peter Seiffert sings the title role as well as anyone alive today could, but the natural youth and brightness of his voice do not particularly suit the character and his torment. Jane Eaglen's Elisabeth is correctly pure and simple, and equally well sung. Waltraud Meier uses her unimpressive voice well as Venus, underscoring the character's incredible sensuality with her intelligent use of the text. While this set has its excitements, better still is the one led by Sinopoli (with Domingo and Cheryl Studer) or the even older Solti recording (out of print) with Christa Ludwig as the finest Venus available and a very strong cast.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:
The libretto of Tannhäuser combines the mythological element of German opera and the medieval history of French Grand Opera. Wagner brings these two together by constructing a plot involving the 14th century Minnesingers and the myth of Venus and her realm of Venusberg ('the mountain of Venus'). Both the historical and the mythological are united in Tannhäuser's personality; although he is an historical poet composer, little is known about him other than myths that surround him. Furthermore, half of the opera takes place in a historical setting, and half takes place in the mythological Venusberg.
Wagner began composing the music during a vacation in Teplitz in the summer of 1843 and completed the full score on 13 April 1845; the opera's famous overture, often played separately as a concert piece, was written last. The instrumentation also shows signs of borrowing from French operatic style. The score includes parts for on-stage brass; however, rather than using French brass instruments, Wagner uses twelve German waldhorns. Wagner also makes use of the harp, another commonplace of French opera.
The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg's concerto, like Schumann's, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano's entrance.


An excerpt from the 1995 performance at La Scala di Milano conducted by Zubin Mehta:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 7:11 pm

313. Felix Mendelssohn –
Elijah (1845)



Recording

Title: Elijah
Performer: Bryn Terfel, Renée Fleming, Patricia Bardon, John Mark Ainsley, Neal Davies
Orchestra: Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Edinburgh Festival Chorus
Conductor: Paul Daniel
Year: 1997


Review

Mendelssohn (1809-1847) is a perennially underrated composer who finally may be coming to greater appreciation. Certainly this fine recording (in English) of a masterpiece that he believed joined the Jewish faith of his fathers with his own Protestant Christianity should not hurt his reputation. The superb Welsh baritone Bryn Terfel gives a dramatically charged performance in the title role, while soprano Renee Fleming sings with beauty and limpid understanding; the cast is almost uniformly strong. The Edinburgh Festival Chorus, directed by David Jones, sings with care and conviction, and Paul Daniel conducts his forces firmly.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:
Mendelssohn uses these Biblical episodes, which in the original are narrated in rather laconic form, to produce intensely — almost luridly — dramatic scenes. These were doubtless well fitted to the taste of Mendelssohn's time, and a Victorian sentimentality also seems detectable in places. Among the episodes are the resurrection of a dead youth, the bringing of rain to parched Israel through Elijah's prayers, and the bodily ascension of Elijah on a fiery chariot into heaven. Perhaps the most dramatic episode is the "contest of the gods", in which Jehovah consumes an offered sacrifice in a column of fire, after a failed sequence of frantic prayers by the prophets of the god Baal. Mendelssohn did not shrink from portraying the episode according to the stark account in the Hebrew Bible, as the discredited prophets of Baal are subsequently taken away and slain.
It is not agreed how Mendelssohn's own view of the Biblical text might have been shaped by his personal history (born into a Jewish family, he was brought up without religion until his baptism as a Lutheran at age seven), though many scholars have speculated about this. In the final section of the oratorio, some draw parallels between the lives of Elijah and Jesus. The Rev. Julius Schubring, one of the librettists who had earlier supplied the text for the oratorio Paulus (St. Paul), wanted to bring a Christian perspective to the end of the oratorio, but Mendelssohn insisted that the story of Elijah be presented faithfully and without revisionism.

Elijah performance on May 3, 2009 at Alys Stephens Center in Birmingham, AL. The Southeastern Chamber Orchestra, Terre Johnson - Conductor:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 7:19 pm

314. Robert Schumann –
Symphony no. 2 (1847)



Recording

Title: Symphonies Nos. 1-4
Performed by Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra
Conducted by David Zinman
Year: 1991


Review

The Second Symphony contains what for me is the most glorious orchestral music Schumann ever wrote: the third movement, marked Adagio espressivo. It can be played meltingly, even languorously, as Sinopoli does in his account, or rather solemnly as Barenboim does in his. Schumann wrote the symphony when he was in the midst of a depression and some commentators hear a melancholy in its strains. Not I. I hear nothing but a glorious song, one of great calm and serenity. And yet there is an undercurrent of uneasiness that suggests the calm may not be as deep as one might wish. And that is exactly what Zinman's version conveys. He does not swoon or moon over the delicious melodies of the movement. He does not over-accentuate that marvelous chain of trills in the high violins. He keeps moving. At first I was not sure I liked this approach, but the more I listened the more I began to feel that other versions were perhaps a bit maudlin, even goopy. The Tonhalle play as gorgeously here as one could possibly wish. There have been times when I felt, in other recordings, their strings were a bit thin, but not here. This is Romantic music played with a clear eye and no self-pity. [One notices, in that wonderful third movement, that Zinman allows his principal winds, as he had in some of the Beethoven symphonies, to add their small presumably improvised ornamentations to semi-cadences. Whether this is accurate performance practice of Schumann's time or not, it adds charm to the reading.]

Trivia

From Wikipedia:
The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).
The symphony was sketched in 1845, but his depression and poor health prevented him finishing the work until October 1846. In the face of this adversity the uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable (the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism). It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor).

Bernstein conducts Schumann Symphony 2 with the Pacific Music Festival Orchestra, Japan, which is his last testament. A few month later, he passed away in USA:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 7:36 pm

315. Robert Schumann –
Piano Trios (1847-1851)



Recording

Title: Complete Piano Trios
Performed by Meaux Arts Trio
Year: 1975


Review

This two-CD set, offering Schumann's groundbreaking Piano Quintet, the Piano Quartet, and the three piano trios, is an exceptional bargain. The approach of the Beaux Arts players and their associates is essentially reflective: they let the music speak for itself and avoid the rhetorical excesses other interpreters often fall victim to. In their hands the quintet, one of Schumann's most inspired creations, receives an especially polished and poised performance, with a lovely dovetailing of voices.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The Piano Trio No. 3 in G minor by Robert Schumann was written in 1851, and is his opus 110.
The work was written in Düsseldorf, and first rehearsed there in mid-November 1851. It was first performed publicly in Leipzig in 1852 and dedicated to Niels Wilhelm Gade. It was not given its first Carnegie Hall performance in New York City until 1958, by the Trio di Bolzano.
This year was a busy one for Schumann, in which he also revised his 1841 symphony in D minor, and wrote his first two violin sonatas, a number of songs and choral works including Der Rose Pilgerfahrt, and also composed his overtures Julius Caesar and Hermann und Dorothea.

Piano Trio #2 in F, Op. 80:

Schumann Piano Trio #2 in F, Op. 80 from Gramercy Trio on Vimeo.


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 7:46 pm

316. Giuseppe Verdi –
Macbeth (1847)



Recording

Title: Macbeth
Performed by La Scala Theater Orchestra & Chorus
with Nicolai Ghiaurov, Piero Cappuccilli, Placido Domingo and Shirley Verrett.
Conducted by Claudio Abbado
Year: 1976


Review

There is tough competition for the best recording of 'Macbeth', but for me the combination of Abbado's explosive and rhythmically taut way with the score and Shirley Verrett's tour de force as Lady Macbeth give this one the edge. Verdi famously maintained he wanted a 'she devil' in the role of Lady Macbeth, and it is a role that has been essayed by both sopranos and mezzos, with varying success. Fiorenza Cossotto (in the rival EMI Muti version) has more idiomatic Italian and forward projection, but sounds generalized and rantingly melodramatic besides this much subtler performance. The variety of tone colours Verrett produces is awesome - the duet with Macbeth (a more than usually involved Piero Cappuccilli) is a locus classicus of opera as theatre. She has the heft and volume when needed (I don't understand the gramophone critic's reservation about Verrett's top notes - they ring out thrillingly) and yet produces an extraordinary performance of the Sleepwalking scene that once heard, haunts the memory - complete with perfectly placed pianissimo top Db. Cappuccilli sings with burnished tone and is suitably histrionic in the Banqueting scene, though not as alert to nuance as Giuseppe Taddei on the Schippers set (alas not recommendable, despite a strong performance from Birgit Nilsson, as it is a Schippers edition with perfectly idiotic cuts, snipping away at some of Verdi's revised moments.) No this is the one to have, Domingo and Ghiaurov give strong support, Abbado's way with the music, from the rum-ti-tum witches and the ballet to the Lady Macbeth scenas and pre-murder duet with Macbeth, the dark heart of this uneven but fascinating score, is fervent and Toscanini-like in its precision, and above all Verrett's mesmerizing performance give this one the palm..

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The first version of Macbeth was completed during the middle of what Verdi was to describe as his "galley years". Ranging from 1842 to 1850, this period saw the composer produce 14 operas, but by the standards of the subject matter of almost all Italian operas during the first fifty years of the 19th century, Macbeth was highly unusual. The 1847 version was very successful and it was presented widely. Pleased with his opera and with its reception, Verdi wrote to Antonio Barezzi, his former father-in-law and long-time supporter, on 25 March 1847 just about two weeks after the premiere: "I have long intended to dedicate an opera to you, who have been father, benefactor, and friend to me. It was a duty I should have fulfilled sooner if imperious circumstances had not prevented me. Now, I send you Macbeth which I prize above all my other operas, and therefore deem worthier to present to you”.

Macbeth. Trailer of the première at the Bavarian State Opera, Munich on October 2, 2008:



JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 7:59 pm

317. Charles-Valentin Alkan –
Grande sonate "Les quatres âges" (1847)



Recording

Title: Grande sonate 'Les quatre âges'
Performed by Marc-Andre Hamelin
Year: 1995


Review

This disc is totally astonishing. One you start listening to it you will not be able to stop. The Grande Sonate is one of the most beautiful, moving, complex pieces of music for solo piano ever written. Hamelin brings it to life like no one else can. If you have never listened to Alkan, this is a fine introduction to some of the greatest (and most forgotten) piano music ever composed. And if you have never listened to Hamelin - this is probably his greatest work ever. The more you listen to the Grande Sonate the more you discover in it. You wait for those dramatic, breathtaking moments. You marvel at how two human hands can produce these sounds through the piano, and you continually find more subtlies and nuances in this materpiece. Words fail in describing how great this recording is. If you love piano music - get it. It you love Alkan it is truly a must.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The sonata's title refers to the subtitles given to each movement, portraying a man at the ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50. The work is dedicated to the composer's father, Alkan Morhange (who died eight years later, in 1855), and was published in 1847.
The sequence of movements is unlike the typical classical piano sonata, in that they become progressively slower; after the lively 20 ans (years), marked 'très vite' (very fast) and the complex 30 ans, subtitled Quasi-Faust, and marked 'assez vite' (quite fast), 40 ans is more sedate, marked 'lentement' (slowly), and 50 ans, dark and pessimistic in mood, is marked 'extrêmement lent' (extremely slow).

Hamelin plays:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 9:05 pm

318. Johann Strauss the Elder –
Radetzky March (1847)



Recording

Title: New Year's Day Concert In Vienna, 1979
Orchestra: Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Willi Boskovsky
Year: 1979


Review

Willi Boskovsky was the conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic orchestra, an orchestra which is run by the musicians who hire their choice of conductors and players. Anyone associated with them has to be good. They form one of the finest orchestras in the world. But in this concert, they just have fun - you will, too.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Radetzky March, Op. 228, is a march composed by Johann Strauss Sr. in 1848. It was dedicated to the Austrian Field Marshal Joseph Radetzky von Radetz, and became quite a popular march among soldiers.
When it was first played, in front of Austrian officers in attendance, they promptly clapped and stomped their feet when they heard the chorus. This tradition is carried over today when the march is played in classical music venues in Vienna, among members of the audience who are familiar with the tradition. It is almost always played as the last piece of music at the Neujahrskonzert, the Vienna New Year Concert.
Despite its military nature, its tone is rather festive than martial. This is because the Field Marshall could have executed the son of Strauss who served in the army, but chose not to. The march is thus more of a piece by a thankful father to the savior of his son than a march about a military man. It is usually played in under three minutes.

The last piece at the New Year's Concert Vienna 1987, with Herbert Von Karajan conducting the Vienna Philharmonic AND THE AUDIENCE, lol:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Mar Dic 21, 2010 9:51 pm

319. Franz Liszt –
Hungarian Rhapsodies (1846-1886)



Recording

Title: Hungarian Rhapsodies
Performer: Gyorgy Cziffra
Year: 1957


Review

There is a certain style and technique that every composer demands of his performers. No performer is universally perfect, but some come closer to achieving the particular style of a given composer that other performers. Gyorgy Cziffra, despite his outrageous fluctuations in tempo and alterations of the score, provides the most thrilling and technically dazzling plowing through of these Hungarian rhapsodies. Cziffra plays the hungarian rhapsodies extravertedly, with wit, finesse, THE greatest technique I have ever heard, occasionally with a tempo, and usually with what Liszt wrote. The last two comments are where contraversy arises. Cziffra added passages and notes into some of the rhapsodies that slightly change the flavor of the music, but it always sounds like Liszt. He also omits the fast scale near the end of number 15 (I don't know why; throughout he plays much harder scales brilliantly), but the performance does not suffer at all from his odd decisions. Also, Cziffra was trained in the 20s and 30s, when alterations of the score were very commonplace (the university had not yet become the primary patron of the music at that point; therefore the intellectual piety towards the composers' marks had not yet developped). Listen to recordings of Busoni, Paderewski, Godowsky, and other people of the 20s-30s play; they all make changes that are often quite striking and odd to our ears (if we know the music). These recordings were made in the 60s, so Cziffra is an anachronism, but that does not make him a lesser artist; he simply abided by the rules of a different era. Secondly, he makes abrupt changes in tempo all the time. If this were a recording of the Beethoven sonatas, such tempo changes would merit a rating of 1 star. But it is a recording of the Liszt rhapsodies hongroises, and everything is for effect. The tempo changes, as brought off by Cziffra, provide a certain change in character where it is needed (or where Cziffra deems it appropriate), and does not detract from the direction of the music at all. Notice that whenever the music actually is going somewhere, which is about 40% of the time in the rhapsodies, Cziffra plays straightly, with rubato (within a tempo) dictated by the phrasing and harmony of the music. Thus, Cziffra commits no sins in his oddities.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Liszt incorporated many themes which he had heard in his native western Hungary and which he believed to be folk music, though many were in fact tunes written by members of the Hungarian upper middle class, or by composers such as József Kossovits, often played by Roma (Gypsy) bands. The large scale structure of each was influenced by the verbunkos, a Hungarian dance in several parts, each with a different tempo. Within this structure, Liszt preserved the two main structural elements of typical Gypsy improvisation—the lassan ("slow") and the friska ("fast"). At the same time, Liszt incorporates a number of effects unique to the sound of Gypsy bands, especially the pianistic equivalent of the cimbalom. He also makes much use of the Hungarian gypsy scale.

Marc Andre Hamelin Plays Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 11:07 am

320. Richard Wagner –
Lohengrin (1850)



Recording

Title: Lohengrin
Performer: Cheryl Studer, Amy-Linda Domaracki, Andreas Schmidt, Bojidar Nikolov, Claudio Otelli, et al.
Orchestra: Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Vienna State Opera Concert Chorus
Conductor: Claudio Abbado
Year: 1994

Review

This is a beautiful modern recording of one of Wagner's most accessible works. Abbado, famous for his Verdi conducting, directs a strong, passionate performance. Siegfried Jerusalem may lack the tonal beauty of Domingo in this role, but he pays more attention to the text and is willing to carefully shade his voice in the more introspective moments. Cheryl Studer is a radiant Elsa, her reedy tone projecting both innocence and goodness. She is not quite as dramatically aware as she was on her earlier live recording from Bayreuth, but her singing is even more beautiful here. Waltraud Meier sings a stupendous Ortrud, bringing both beauty of tone and sensuality to a role normal sung by roaring harpies. Many people claim the Solti recording of this opera as the best, but I prefer this one for its beauty and simplicity.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Lohengrin is a romantic opera in three acts composed and written by Richard Wagner, first performed in 1850. The story of the eponymous character is taken from medieval German romance, notably the Parzival of Wolfram von Eschenbach and its sequel, Lohengrin, written by a different author, itself inspired by the epic of Garin le Loherain. It is part of the Knight of the Swan tradition.
The opera has proved inspirational towards other works of art. Among those deeply moved by the fairy-tale opera was the young King Ludwig II of Bavaria. 'Der Märchenkönig' ('The Fairy-tale King') as he was dubbed later built his ideal fairy-tale castle and dubbed it "New Swan Stone," or "Neuschwanstein", after the Swan Knight. It was King Ludwig's patronage that later gave Wagner the means and opportunity to build a theatre for, compose and stage his epic cycle, the Ring of the Nibelung.
The most popular and recognizable part of the opera is the Bridal Chorus known better as "Here Comes the Bride", played at weddings in the West.

Trailer of the festival première at the Bavarian State Opera, Munich on July 5, 2009:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 12:02 pm

321. Robert Schumann - Concertstück for Four Horns (1849)


Recording

Title: Schumann, Handel, Haydn, Telemann: Concertos for Four Horns
Performer: American Horn Quartet and Sinfonia Varsovia
Conducted by Dariusz Wisniewski
Year: 2003

Review

Schumann's short concerto is a cracker, in the usual 3-movement layout. This was described by Tovey as nearly unplayable, but today's virtuosi seem to be afraid of nothing. They even restore some high notes that Schumann revised out of the score, and what a thrilling effect they make. The four soloists are the lead horn-players, American by nationality, in various European orchestras, and they cover themselves with distinction from start to finish. Four virtuoso horn solos naturally take the limelight off the orchestra, but the Sinfonia Varsovia acquit themselves splendidly, particularly in the Haydn symphony where the treatment of the instruments is more democratic and all sections of the band get their chance to shine.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Peter Schamoni's 1983 movie Frühlingssinfonie (Spring Symphony) tells the story of Robert and Clara's romance, against her father's opposition. Robert was played by Herbert Grönemeyer, Clara by Nastassja Kinski, and Clara's father by Rolf Hoppe. The role of Niccolò Paganini was played by the violinist Gidon Kremer. The score was written by Grönemeyer and conducted by Wolfgang Sawallisch.

Performed at the Palacio de la Ópera in La Coruña, Spain (2008)
Orquesta Sinfónica de Galicia
James Judd, director:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 12:56 pm

322. Robert Schumann –
Fantasiestück, op. 73 (1849)



Recording

Title: Steven Isserlis Plays Schumann
Performed by Neuss German Chamber Philharmonic with Steven Isserlis
Conducted by Christoph Eschenbach
Year: 1997

Review

Quite simply : this is the greatest recording of the greatest Cello concerto that the world has ever known. Isserlis knows Schumann. His Cello bleeds the Davidsbundler Master into every passion-note. His collaborators here seem infected by the Schumann/Isserlis heavenly inspiration. How good is it beyond being the best? Well it makes Ma's terrific version sound almost mechanical! Once in a great while there exists such profound intimacy between a great composer and an artist that eternal magic shakes the firmament. Such a wedding is rare and to be treasured when found. The insouciant inclusion of the gourgeous
adagio of Bargiel, a Florestan/Eusibius protege, plus a "few extras", shows that Isserlis is not only in touch completely with Schumann, but in a total harmony that transcendentally and ethereally touches the soul as each lovng bar caresses the senses.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Schumann wrote them over just two days in February 1849, and originally entitled them "Night Pieces" before settling on the title "Fantasy Pieces". The title is one Schumann was fond of, since he used it in several works. This poetic title promotes the fundamental Romantic notion that creative expression is the product of the artist's unrestricted imagination. In addition, the connotations of "fantasy" justify the sudden mood changes, which are a signature of so much of Schumann’s music, and which reflect his emotions and mood swings. The pieces are like songs without words, or an instrumental song cycle.

Steven Isserlis gives a cello masterclass on Schumann's "Fantasy Pieces":



Última edición por JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 8:57 pm, editado 1 vez

JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 7:05 pm

323. Otto Nicolai - The Merry Wives of Windsor (1849)


Recording

Title: Die Lustigen Weiber von Windsor
Performer: Gottlob Frick, Ernst Gutstein, Kieth Engen, Fritz Wunderlich, Edith Mathis, et al.
Orchestra: Bayerisches Staatsorchester
Conductor: Robert Heger ç
Year: 1964

Review

Otto Nicolai's, 'Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor', based on a libretto by Hermann Mosenthal (1845), an adaptation of Shakespeare's, 'The Merry Wives of Windsor', is indeed a merry piece. Many may be familiar with the opera only by the overture, a concert favourite. But the opera itself is loaded with melodic arias, sparkling duets and ensembles, and just really fun music, expertly crafted.

Of course, Sir John Falstaff, that rotund, jovial, womanizing knight, has played a leading character in operas by Verdi (Falstaff) and Vaughan-Williams (Sir John in Love). They should not be compared. Each provides a very different perspective, in very different musical languages.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The opera is a Singspiel, containing much spoken dialogue between distinct musical numbers. The opera remains popular in Germany, and the overture is sometimes heard in concert in other countries.
The first performance was at the Hofoper in Berlin on 9 March 1849.
The story is close to that of Giuseppe Verdi's Falstaff. Pistol and Bardolph are absent from this version, but Slender is present. The women have German names. Alice is Frau Fluth and Meg is Frau Reich.

Movie adaptation of the opera (German):


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 7:16 pm

324. Robert Schumann - Symphony no. 3, "Rhenish" (1850)


Recording

Title: Schumann - The Symphonies
Performed by Berlin State Choir
Conducted by Daniel Barenboim
Year: 1992

Review

Symphony No. 3, Op. 97, the "Rhenish," is perhaps the most popular Schumann’s symphony.Written in 1850, it evokes the Rhine, the "sacred river" Schumann loved, celebrated in song, and finally turned to for deliverance from unendurable despair.
The performances recorded here should dispel the hoary fallacy that Schumann was a miniaturist incapable of handling large forms and inept at orchestration. The Staatskapelle, Berlin's oldest orchestra, has these symphonies in its bloodstream; as the Opera's pit band, its glorious sound is undoubtedly influenced by working with singers: free of sharp edges and attacks, sustained, warm, and mellow. Barenboim, its Music Director since 1992, approaches the symphonies with profound intellectual understanding and emotional affinity, combining a sense of structure, coherence, irresistible sweep and grandeur with loving attention to expressive detail. Carefully balancing sonorities, he brings out usually hidden lines and voices, proving that Schumann's orchestration, often called turgid, is in fact transparent and full of color.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

Within the same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he also completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was said to be a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt as if they were on a pilgrimage. As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity. In this case, the three flats represent the trinity being the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

Wiener Philarmoniker conducted by Leonard Bernstein:


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  JM el Miér Dic 22, 2010 8:56 pm

325. Robert Schumann - Cello Concerto in A minor (1850)


Recording

Title: Steven Isserlis Plays Schumann
Performed by Neuss German Chamber Philharmonic with Steven Isserlis
Conducted by Christoph Eschenbach
Year: 1997

Review

Quite simply : this is the greatest recording of the greatest Cello concerto that the world has ever known. Isserlis knows Schumann. His Cello bleeds the Davidsbundler Master into every passion-note. His collaborators here seem infected by the Schumann/Isserlis heavenly inspiration. How good is it beyond being the best? Well it makes Ma's terrific version sound almost mechanical! Once in a great while there exists such profound intimacy between a great composer and an artist that eternal magic shakes the firmament. Such a wedding is rare and to be treasured when found. The insouciant inclusion of the gourgeous
adagio of Bargiel, a Florestan/Eusibius protege, plus a "few extras", shows that Isserlis is not only in touch completely with Schumann, but in a total harmony that transcendentally and ethereally touches the soul as each lovng bar caresses the senses.
Everyone knows the Concerto and other cello pieces so I won't bother with any analysis except to say that from Zwickau to Endenich RAS is smiling as , perhaps, he never did in his life. Isserlis knows Schumann.And , yes : this is the greatest recording of the greatest Cello Concerto that the world has ever known.

Trivia

From Wikipedia:

The concerto was never played in Schumann's lifetime. It was premièred on 9 June 1860, four years after his death, at the Leipzig Conservatory in a concert in honour of the 50th anniversary of Schumann's birth, with Ludwig Ebert as soloist.
The work is scored for solo cello, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings.

Cello Concerto in A minor, Op.129 - I. Nicht zu schnell
Mstislav Rostropovich, cello
Orchestre National de France, Leonard Bernstein
October 1976


JM

Cantidad de envíos : 1944
Fecha de inscripción : 01/09/2008

Ver perfil de usuario

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: 1001 classical works (The best) V- 1829-1850

Mensaje  Contenido patrocinado Hoy a las 4:57 am


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Página 3 de 3. Precedente  1, 2, 3

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.