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1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:17 am

378
Sasom i en spegel (Through a glass darkly) (Ingmar Bergman, 1961)




Through a Glass Darkly (Swedish: Såsom i en spegel ("As in a mirror")) is a 1961 Swedish film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman, and produced by Allan Ekelund. The film is a three-act “chamber film,” in which four family members act as mirrors for each other. It is the first of many Bergman films to be shot on the island of Fårö.
The story takes place during a twenty-four hour period while four family members vacation on a remote island, shortly after one of them, Karin (Harriet Andersson), who suffers from schizophrenia was released from an asylum. Karin's husband Martin (Max von Sydow) tells her and Minus's (Lars Passgård) father, David, that Karin's disease is almost incurable. Meanwhile, Minus tells Karin that he wishes he could have a real conversation with his father, and cries because he feels deprived of his father's affection. David (Gunnar Björnstrand) is a second-rate novelist who has just returned from a long trip abroad. He announces he will leave again in a month, though he promised he would stay. The others are upset, and David gives them bad, last-minute presents. He leaves them and sobs alone for a moment. When he returns, the others cheerfully announce that they too have a "surprise" for David; they perform a play for him that Minus has written. David takes offense (although approving on the outside with cries of "author, author") at the play, which can be interpreted as an attack on his character and art.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:21 am

379
Chronique d'un été (Chronicle of a summer)
(Edgar Morin & Jean Rouch, 1961)




Chronique d'un été (Chronicle of a Summer) is a documentary film made during the summer of 1960 by sociologist Edgar Morin and anthropologist and filmmaker Jean Rouch, with the esthetic collaboration of director cameraman Michel Brault. The film begins with a discussion between Rouch and Morin on whether or not it is possible to act sincerely in front of a camera. A cast of real life individuals are then introduced and are led by the filmmakers to discuss topics on the themes of French society and happiness in the working class. At the end of the movie, the filmmakers show their subjects the compiled footage and have the subjects discuss the level of reality that they thought the movie obtained.
This feature was filmed in Paris and Saint-Tropez France.
It is widely regarded as an experimental and structurally innovative film and an example of cinéma vérité.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:24 am

380
The hustler (Robert Rossen, 1961)




Paul Newman shines as cocky poolroom hustler "Fast" Eddie Felson in Robert Rossen's atmospheric adaptation of the Walter Tevis novel. Newman's Felson is a swaggering pool shark punk who takes on the king of the poolroom, Minnesota Fats (a cool, assured Jackie Gleason in his most understated performance). After losing big and crashing into a void of self-pity, Eddie meets down-and-out Sarah (Piper Laurie in a delicate performance), an alcoholic blue blood who's dropped into Eddie's world of dingy bars and seedy poolrooms. Eddie regains his confidence and attracts the attention of a shifty, calculating promoter, Bert Gordon (George C. Scott at his most heartless), who offers to bring Eddie into the big money--but at what cost? Rossen brings his film to life with the easy pace of a pool game, giving his actors room to explore their characters and develop into a razor-sharp ensemble. Eugen Schüfftan earned an Academy Award for his shadowing black-and-white cinematography, as did art directors Harry Horner and Gene Callahan for their deceivingly simple set designs. Even in the daylight this film seems to be smothered by night, lit by the dim glow of a bar lamp or the overhead glare of a pool-table light, an appropriate environment for this tale of one man's struggle with his soul and his self-esteem. Newman returned as an older, wiser, cagier Felson 25 years later in Martin Scorsese's Color of Money.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:31 am

381
West Side Story (Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins, 1961)




The winner of 10 Academy Awards, this 1961 musical by choreographer Jerome Robbins and director Robert Wise (The Sound of Music) remains irresistible. Based on a smash Broadway play updating Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet to the 1950s era of juvenile delinquency, the film stars Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer as the star-crossed lovers from different neighborhoods--and ethnicities. The film's real selling points, however, are the highly charged and inventive song-and-dance numbers, the passionate ballads, the moody sets, colorful support from Rita Moreno, and the sheer accomplishment of Hollywood talent and technology producing a film so stirring. Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim wrote the score.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:33 am

382
Mondo cane (A dog's world)
(Paolo Cavara, Gualtiero Jacopetti & Franco Prosperi, 1962)




Mondo Cane (A Dog's World; also a mild Italian curse) is a 1962 Italian documentary film by Italian filmmakers Paolo Cavara, Gualtiero Jacopetti, and Franco Prosperi. The film consists of a series of travelogue vignettes providing glimpses into cultural practices throughout the world intended to shock or surprise the mostly Western film audience, including an insect banquet and a memorable look at a practising South Pacific cargo cult. Mondo Cane's shock-exploitation-documentary style was the inspiration for numerous imitations, including Shocking Asia and the Faces of Death shockumentary series of movies.
It was nominated for the Palme d'Or, the highest prize given to a competing film at the Cannes Film Festival. The movie's theme song, "More," was written by Riz Ortolani and Nino Oliviero and was given a new lyric in the English language by Norman Newell. In 1964, the song was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song. The film's video packaging states it won an Oscar, although it was only nominated.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:35 am

383
Cléo de 5 á 7 (Cleo from 5 to 7) (Agnes Varda, 1962)




Agnes Varda, the lone woman in the French New Wave boys' club, made her reputation with her second feature Cleo from 5 to 7, a 90-minute drama set in real time exploring the internal turmoil of a flighty young pop singer who awaits the results of a medical examination for cancer. Leaving behind her elegant, almost antiseptic apartment for the bustle of the Parisian streets, she weaves through crowds and watches street performers while struggling with her fears and self-recriminations, confronting her shortcomings and finding hope in a chance meeting with a young soldier. Varda captures the vibrant social world and its easy rhythms in creamy black and white with smooth long takes, bringing an almost tactile quality to Cleo's personal odyssey, punctuated with chapter titles marking the time until her appointment at the hospital. Corinne Marchand's Cleo enters as a spoiled adolescent, but introspective internal monologues and brief encounters with strangers etch a portrait of a woman hiding her fears under a façade of flightiness, only discarding the mask when she firmly embraces life in the face of possible death.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:51 am

384
Dog star man (Stan Brakhage, 1961-1964)




Dog Star Man is a series of short experimental films, all directed by Stan Brakhage:

Prelude: Dog Star Man (1961)
Dog Star Man: Part I (1962)
Dog Star Man: Part II (1963)
Dog Star Man: Part III (1964)
Dog Star Man: Part IV (1964)
The same footage was also made into a much longer film, The Art of Vision. Both are generally considered the masterpieces of his first mature period.
Combining constantly shifting images of snow, sky, woods, family, dog, light, solar flames, and more with reticulated, painted and variously altered frames to create a spiritual, nebulous yet sparkling film of vast quiet nearly natural energy. See this at all costs. Brilliant doesn't come close to describing this beautiful work.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:55 am

385
Sanma no aji (An autumn afternoon) (Yasujiro Ozu, 1962)




An Autumn Afternoon (Sanma no aji) (1962) was the final film directed by Yasujiro Ozu, who died the following year. Known in Japan as Sanma no Aji (literally, "The Taste of a Pacific saury"), the film--shot using Agfacolor-stars Ozu regular Chishu Ryu as the patriarch of the Hirayama family who oversees the wedding of his daughter, played by Shima Iwashita.
The film follows the plight of a widowed father (Ryu) who is trying to marry off his daughter (Iwashita) in an arranged marriage.
Despite this premise, the film actually follows the life of the father, coming to terms with his past. His daughter is married off, but the film does not even show the ceremony. The film also features the ribald mockery of Mr Horie (Kita) who has recently married a much younger woman.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 2:02 am

386
L'eclisse (The eclipse) (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1962)




Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Eclisse rolls over you and wraps you in its stylish embrace. The plot, such as it is, follows Vittoria (luscious Monica Vitti, The Red Desert) as her engagement falls apart and she slowly falls into a giddy but anxious affair with Piero (Alain Delon, Le Samourai, Purple Noon), a trader in Rome's stock exchange. Like Ingmar Bergman (Scenes from a Marriage, Persona), Antonioni examines the nuances of human relationships--but where Bergman is dense and dialogue-driven, Antonioni is spare and visual (there's maybe a page of dialogue in the first fifteen minutes of L'Eclisse). Every frame is like an exquisite black and white photograph, yet there's nothing static about this movie. It's fluid, sleek, and graceful, achieving its own kind of visual music. L'Eclisse contrasts opposing elements: Light and shadow, noise and silence, laughter and death, love and money, desire and dissatisfaction. Critics often describe the movie as a portrait of modern alienation, but they focus too much on Vittoria herself; while she finds her own life wanting, all around her Antonioni's camera captures a much larger world, full of as much vitality as despair, as much hope as loss. This is a movie essential to anyone's understanding of what movies can be.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 2:04 am

387
Lawrence of Arabia (David Lean, 1962)




There's no getting around a simple, basic truth: watching Lawrence of Arabia in any home-video format represents a compromise. There's no better way to appreciate this epic biographical adventure than to see it projected in 70 millimeter onto a huge theater screen. That caveat aside, David Lean's masterful "desert classic" is still enjoyable on the small screen, especially if viewed in widescreen format. (If your only option is to view a "pan & scan" version, it's best not to bother; this is a film for which the widescreen format is utterly mandatory.) Peter O'Toole gives a star-making performance as T.E. Lawrence, the eccentric British officer who united the desert tribes of Arabia against the Turks during World War I. Lean orchestrates sweeping battle sequences and breathtaking action, but the film is really about the adventures and trials that transform Lawrence into a legendary man of the desert. Lean traces this transformation on a vast canvas of awesome physicality; no other movie has captured the expanse of the desert with such scope and grandeur. Equally important is the psychology of Lawrence, who remains an enigma even as we grasp his identification with the desert. Perhaps the greatest triumph of this landmark film is that Lean has conveyed the romance, danger, and allure of the desert with such physical and emotional power. It's a film about a man who leads one life but is irresistibly drawn to another, where his greatness and mystery are allowed to flourish in equal measure.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 2:07 am

388
To kill a mockingbird (Robert Mulligan, 1962)




Ranked 34 on the American Film Institute's list of the 100 Greatest American Films, To Kill a Mockingbird is quite simply one of the finest family-oriented dramas ever made. A beautiful and deeply affecting adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee, the film retains a timeless quality that transcends its historically dated subject matter (racism in the Depression-era South) and remains powerfully resonant in present-day America with its advocacy of tolerance, justice, integrity, and loving, responsible parenthood. It's tempting to call this an important "message" movie that should be required viewing for children and adults alike, but this riveting courtroom drama is anything but stodgy or pedantic. As Atticus Finch, the small-town Alabama lawyer and widower father of two, Gregory Peck gives one of his finest performances with his impassioned defense of a black man (Brock Peters) wrongfully accused of the rape and assault of a young white woman. While his children, Scout (Mary Badham) and Jem (Philip Alford), learn the realities of racial prejudice and irrational hatred, they also learn to overcome their fear of the unknown as personified by their mysterious, mostly unseen neighbor Boo Radley (Robert Duvall, in his brilliant, almost completely nonverbal screen debut). What emerges from this evocative, exquisitely filmed drama is a pure distillation of the themes of Harper Lee's enduring novel, a showcase for some of the finest American acting ever assembled in one film, and a rare quality of humanitarian artistry (including Horton Foote's splendid screenplay and Elmer Bernstein's outstanding score) that seems all but lost in the chaotic morass of modern cinema.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 2:09 am

389
The Manchurian candidate (John Frankenheimer, 1962)




You will never find a more chillingly suspenseful, perversely funny, or viciously satirical political thriller than The Manchurian Candidate, based on the novel by Richard Condon (author of Winter Kills). The film, withheld from distribution by star Frank Sinatra for almost a quarter century after President Kennedy's assassination, has lost none of its potency over time. Former infantryman Bennet Marco (Sinatra) is haunted by nightmares about his platoon having been captured and brainwashed in Korea. The indecipherable dreams seem to center on Sergeant Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey), a decorated war hero but a cold fish of a man whose own mother (Angela Lansbury, in one of the all-time great dragon-lady roles) describes him as looking like his head is "always about to come to a point." Mrs. Bates has nothing on Lansbury's character, the manipulative queen behind her second husband, Senator John Iselin (James Gregory), a notoriously McCarthyesque demagogue.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 2:11 am

390
Lolita (Stanley Kubrick, 1962)




When director Stanley Kubrick released his film adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel about a hopelessly pathetic middle-aged professor's sexual obsession with his 12-year-old stepdaughter, the ads read, "How did they ever make a film of Lolita?" The answer is "they" didn't. As he did with his "adaptations" of Barry Lyndon, A Clockwork Orange, and, especially, The Shining, Kubrick used the source material and, simply put, made another Stanley Kubrick movie--even though Nabokov himself wrote the screenplay. The chilly director nullifies Humbert Humbert's (James Mason's) overwhelming passion and desire, and instead transforms the story, like many of his films, into that of a man trapped and ruined by social codes and by his own obsessions. Kubrick doesn't play this as tragedy, however, but rather as both a black-as-coffee screwball comedy and a meandering, episodic road movie. The early scenes between Humbert, Lolita (a too-old but suitably teasing Lyons) and her loud, garish mother (Shelley Winters in one of her funniest performances) play like a wonderful farce. When Humbert finally fulfills his desires and captures Lolita, the pair hit the road and Kubrick drags in Peter Sellers. As the pedophilic writer Clare Quilty--Humbert's playful doppelgänger and biggest threat--Sellers dons a series of disguises with plans of stealing Lolita away from her captor. It's here more than anywhere that Kubrick comes closest to the novel. He extends Nabokov's idea of the games and puzzles played between reader and writer, Quilty and Humbert, Lolita and Humbert, etc., to those between filmmaker and audience: the road eventually goes nowhere and Humbert's reality is exposed as mad delusion. Perhaps not a Kubrick masterpiece, or the provocative film many wanted, Lolita still remains playfully fascinating and one of Kubrick's strongest, funniest character studies.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 2:14 am

391
O pagador de promesas (Keeper of promises) (Anselmo Duarte, 1962)




O Pagador de Promessas is a 1962 Brazilian drama film directed by Anselmo Duarte. Its title literally translates as The Payer of Promises, but the film has been known by several other names in the English-speaking world, such as Keeper of Promises, The Given Word and The Promise.
Duarte, who was also one of the film's producers, adapted the screenplay himself from the famous stage play written by Dias Gomes. It won the 1962 Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, becoming the first (and only, to date) Brazilian film to achieve such a feat. A year later, it also became the first Brazilian film in history to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.
Zé do Burro (Leonardo Villar) is a landowner from Nordeste. His best friend is a donkey. When his donkey falls terminally ill, Zé makes a promise to a Candomblé priestess: if his donkey recovers, he will give away his land to the poor and carry a cross all the way from his farm to the cathedral of St. Bárbara in Salvador, Bahia, where he will offer the cross to the local priest. Upon the recovery of his donkey, Zé leaves on his journey. The movie begins as Zé, followed by his wife Rosa (Glória Menezes), arrives outside the cathedral. The local priest (Dionísio Azevedo) refuses to accept the cross once he hears about Zé's "pagan" pledge and the reasons behind it. Everyone attempts to manipulate the innocent and naïve Zé. The local Candomblé worshippers, for example, want to use him as a leader against the discrimination they suffer from the Roman Catholic Church. The sensationalist newspapers transform his promise to give away his land into a call for land reform (which still is a very controversial issue in Brazil). When Zé is shot by the police to prevent his way into the church, the Candomblé worshippers put his dead body on the cross and force their way into the church.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 12:33 pm

392
The man who shot Liberty Valance (John Ford, 1962)




"When the legend becomes fact, print the legend." That's more than the code of a newspaperman in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance; it's practically the operating credo of director John Ford, the most honored of American filmmakers. In this late film from a long career, Ford looks at the civilizing of an Old West town, Shinbone, through the sad memories of settlers looking back. In the town's wide-open youth, two-fisted Westerner John Wayne and tenderfoot newcomer James Stewart clash over a woman (Vera Miles) but ultimately unite against the notorious outlaw Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin). Ford's nostalgia for the past is tempered by his stark approach, unusual for the visual poet of Stagecoach and The Searchers. The two heavyweights, Wayne and Stewart, are good together, with Wayne the embodiment of rugged individualism and Stewart the idealistic prophet of the civilization that will eventually tame the Wild West. This may be the saddest Western ever made, closer to an elegy than an action movie, and as cleanly beautiful as its central symbol, the cactus rose.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 12:35 pm

393
What ever happened to Baby Jane? (Robert Aldrich, 1962)




A cultish horror favorite, 1962's What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? will make you think twice before hungrily unveiling a covered plate of food. Bette Davis stars as Jane Hudson, a onetime child actress and singer. As an elderly woman, she wishes to revive her vaudevillian career, but she has become a grotesque caricature of her former self. Over the years as her star faded, the star of her older sister Blanche (Joan Crawford) rose, outshining the career of the has-been Baby Jane. Jane was relegated to minor roles, which she only won when Blanche demanded that she be awarded them. The film opens years after a calamitous car accident leaves Blanche in a wheelchair, with no one to care for her except the increasingly insane and sadistic Jane and their servant, Norman. Trying to punish Blanche for her years of success, Jane tortures the housebound woman, slowly trying to starve her to death, all the while attempting to recapture the fame of her youth. This dark drama also stars Victor Buono as the hefty pianist who answers Jane's ad for an accompanist, hoping to milk some money off the demented old woman. Both Buono and Davis were nominated for Oscars for their roles in this suspenseful and somewhat sick thriller that exploited well the real-life antagonism between Davis and Crawford, while at the same time rejuvenated both their careers.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 12:38 pm

394
Vivre sa vie (My life to live) (Jean-Luc Godard, 1962)




Vivre sa Vie: Film en Douze Tableaux ("To Live Her Life: A Film in Twelve Scenes") is a 1962 film directed by Jean-Luc Godard. It was released in the U.S. as My Life to Live and in the UK as It's My Life.

The film stars Anna Karina, Godard's then wife, as Nana, a young Parisian woman who abandons her marriage and a child in order to pursue a career as an actress. Faced with financial troubles she drifts into prostitution. Nana believes she makes this choice of her own free will, but the film emphasizes the social structure that forces the poor into such situations, and builds to a tragic conclusion.
In Vivre sa vie, Godard borrowed the aesthetics of the cinéma vérité approach to documentary film-making that was then becoming fashionable. However, this film differed from other films of the French New Wave by being photographed with a heavy Mitchell camera, as opposed to the light weight cameras used for earlier films. The cinematographer was Raoul Coutard, a frequent collaborator of Godard.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 12:41 pm

395
Heaven and Earth magic (Harry Smith, 1962)




Heaven and Earth Magic (also called Number 12, The Magic Feature, or Heaven and Earth Magic Feature) is an American avant garde feature film made by Harry Everett Smith. Originally released in 1957, it was re-edited several times and the final version was released in 1962. The film primarily uses cut-out-animated photographs.
The 66-minute cut of the film is now available on DVD and VHS from the Harry Smith Archives. It is sometimes screened at one-time cinema events, often with some kind of live music instead of the film's soundtrack (which consists solely of sound effects).
This film is screened at John Zorn's Essential Cinema concerts, where a group of musicians perform behind the film. In the liner notes to Naked City's "Heretic" album it says "This record is dedicated to Harry Smith. Mystical Animator, Pioneer Ethnomusicologist, Hermetic Scholar, Creator of Heave + Earth Magic, one of the greatest films of all time."


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 12:43 pm

396
The birds (Alfred Hitchcock, 1963)




Vacationing in northern California, Alfred Hitchcock was struck by a story in a Santa Cruz newspaper: "Seabird Invasion Hits Coastal Homes." From this peculiar incident, and his memory of a short story by Daphne du Maurier, the master of suspense created one of his strangest and most terrifying films. The Birds follows a chic blonde, Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren), as she travels to the coastal town of Bodega Bay to hook up with a rugged fellow (Rod Taylor) she's only just met. Before long the town is attacked by marauding birds, and Hitchcock's skill at staging action is brought to the fore. Beyond the superb effects, however, The Birds is also one of Hitchcock's most psychologically complicated scenarios, a tense study of violence, loneliness, and complacency. What really gets under your skin are not the bird skirmishes but the anxiety and the eerie quiet between attacks. The director elevated an unknown model, Tippi Hedren (mother of Melanie Griffith), to being his latest cool, blond leading lady, an experience that was not always easy on the much-pecked Ms. Hedren. Still, she returned for the next Hitchcock picture, the underrated Marnie. Treated with scant attention by serious critics in 1963, The Birds has grown into a classic and--despite the sci-fi trappings--one of Hitchcock's most serious films.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:02 pm

397
The nutty professor (Jerry Lewis, 1963)




Jerry Lewis's 1963 Jekyll and Hyde variation has always been tagged by two popular assumptions: one is that it is his best work as a comic filmmaker, and the other is that Lewis's Mr. Hyde equivalent--the slick, ultra-arrogant, good-looking womanizer Buddy Love--actually lampoons the director's former partner, Dean Martin. Well, The Nutty Professor certainly is Lewis's best film. But all one has to do is watch it to realize the motivation behind Buddy Love is more confessional: he's really much more like Lewis's darker, narcissistic side, while the shlubby scientist (also played by Lewis) from whom Love springs is closer to the star's screen image. You can watch all this psychodrama yourself and have a lot of good laughs at the same time with this unusual film, which still surpasses Eddie Murphy's recent remake--though not necessarily by a wide gap.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:18 pm

398
Blonde Cobra (Ken Jacobs, 1963)




In the late '50s, Jack Smith was acting in a film for director Bob Fleischner, but the project ended when the two had a falling out. A fire subsequently destroyed most of what had been filmed, but in 1960, Fleischner gave the remaining footage to director Ken Jacobs, who edited it into this short, which features a manic Smith putting on makeup, playing with dolls, smoking marijuana, and wearing dresses. By 1962, Jacobs' own falling out with Smith had cooled sufficiently to enable him to record a soundtrack, for which Jacobs mixed 78 rpm records and strummed inside a piano while Smith improvised a hilarious confessional rant of poverty and desperation: "Why shave when I can't think of a reason for living?"


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 1:21 pm

399
The cool world (Shirley Clarke, 1964)




The Cool World is a 1964 film about life in the African-American ghetto in the early 1960s. It stars Hampton Clanton, Yolanda Rodríguez, Bostic Felton, Gary Bolling, Antonio Fargas, Carl Lee and Clarence Williams III.
The movie was adapted by Shirley Clarke and Carl Lee from the novel by Warren Miller, directed by Clarke and produced by Frederick Wiseman. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 5:42 pm

400
Otto e mezzo (8 1/2) (Federico Fellini, 1963)




Federico Fellini's 1963 semi-autobiographical story about a worshipped filmmaker who has lost his inspiration is still a mesmerizing mystery tour that has been quoted (Woody Allen's Stardust Memories, Paul Mazursky's Alex in Wonderland) but never duplicated. Marcello Mastroianni plays Guido, a director trying to relax a bit in the wake of his latest hit. Besieged by people eager to work with him, however, he also struggles to find his next idea for a film. The combined pressures draw him within himself, where his recollections of significant events in his life and the many lovers he has left behind begin to haunt him. The marriage of Fellini's hyperreal imagery, dreamy sidebars, and the gravity of Guido's increasing guilt and self-awareness make this as much a deeply moving, soulful film as it is an electrifying spectacle. Mastroianni is wonderful in the lead, his woozy sensitivity to Guido's freefall both touching and charming--all the more so as the character becomes increasingly divorced from the celebrity hype that ultimately outpaces him.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 5:46 pm

401
Pasazerka (Passenger) (Andrzej Munk & Witold Lesiewicz, 1963)




Passenger (Polish; Pasażerka) is a 1963 film by Andrzej Munk and Witold Lesiewicz.
Passenger is a story of a Holocaust survivor who meets one of the camp guards after the war. The director of the film died in a car accident during the production of the film and it was finished by his colleague Witold Lesiewicz from parts of original footage and screenplay sketches. Parts of the film were shot in Auschwitz concentration camp. The source was a radio drama 'Passenger from Cabin Number 45', written by Zofia Posmysz-Piasecka in 1959.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

Mensaje  JM el Sáb Oct 31, 2009 5:51 pm

402
Le mépris (Contempt) (Jean-Luc Godard, 1963)




With his aptly titled Contempt, Jean-Luc Godard embraced the widescreen splendor of Hollywood while thumbing his nose at Hollywood itself. A rebel with a cause, Godard pursues an iconoclast's agenda, using the Franscope format (expertly controlled by cinematographer Raoul Coutard) to undermine the grandeur of widescreen melodramas. The story ostensibly concerns an innovative production of Homer's Odyssey and the struggle of a respected screenwriter (Michel Piccoli) to please a pugnacious producer (Jack Palance), a veteran director (Fritz Lang, essentially playing himself), and a petulant wife (Brigitte Bardot) who's grown tired of their turbulent relationship. It's all pretense, however, for Godard's mischievous (and yes, contemptuous) deconstruction of commercial Hollywood filmmaking, potently infused with film-buff in-jokes, astute observations about love, stardom, and artistry, and enough glossy style to suggest that Godard had mastered the craft he so willfully rejects. Contempt is one of his most accessibly fascinating films.


JM

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Re: 1001 films you must see before you die- Part VIII: 1960-1964

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